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Regular dorsal dimples and damaged mites of Varroa destructor in some Iranian honey bees (Apis mellifera).

Ardestani MM, Ebadi R, Tahmasbi G - Exp. Appl. Acarol. (2011)

Bottom Line: These colonies were part of the National Honey bee Breeding Program that resulted in province-specific races.The results did not show any statistical differences between the colonies within provinces for injuries to mites, but there were some differences among province-specific lines.There were also some regular dorsal dimples on dorsal idiosoma of the mites that were placed in categories separate from mites damaged by bees.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal Ecology, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. masoud.mortazavi@falw.vu.nl

ABSTRACT
The frequency of damaged Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman (Mesostigmata: Varroidae) found on the bottom board of hives of the honey bee, Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae) has been used as an indicator of the degree of tolerance or resistance of honey bee colonies against mites. However, it is not clear that this measure is adequate. These injuries should be separated from regular dorsal dimples that have a developmental origin. To investigate damage to Varroa mites and regular dorsal dimples, 32 honey bee (A. mellifera) colonies were selected from four Iranian provinces: Isfahan, Markazi, Qazvin, and Tehran. These colonies were part of the National Honey bee Breeding Program that resulted in province-specific races. In April, Varroa mites were collected from heavily infested colonies and used to infest the 32 experimental colonies. In August, 20 of these colonies were selected (five colonies from each province). Adult bees from these colonies were placed in cages and after introducing mites, damaged mites were collected from each cage every day. The average percentage of injured mites ranged from 0.6 to 3.0% in four provinces. The results did not show any statistical differences between the colonies within provinces for injuries to mites, but there were some differences among province-specific lines. Two kinds of injuries to the mites were observed: injuries to legs and pedipalps, and injuries to other parts of the body. There were also some regular dorsal dimples on dorsal idiosoma of the mites that were placed in categories separate from mites damaged by bees. This type of classification helps identifying damage to mites and comparing them with developmental origin symptoms, and may provide criteria for selecting bees tolerant or resistant to this mite.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Left leg-damaged mite as a consequence of grooming behaviour; right regular dorsal dimples on the mite dorsal idiosoma. Scale bars = 0.5 mm
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Fig1: Left leg-damaged mite as a consequence of grooming behaviour; right regular dorsal dimples on the mite dorsal idiosoma. Scale bars = 0.5 mm

Mentions: Honey bee workers detached the mites with their mandibles and injured their legs. As a result of the grooming behaviour, two or more mite legs were removed. In some samples, most of the mite legs were removed (Fig. 1). Most damage to mite legs (2.7% on average) was found in Qazvin province, whereas damage to mite legs was 0.6% in Isfahan, 0.9% in Tehran and 0% in Markazi.Fig. 1


Regular dorsal dimples and damaged mites of Varroa destructor in some Iranian honey bees (Apis mellifera).

Ardestani MM, Ebadi R, Tahmasbi G - Exp. Appl. Acarol. (2011)

Left leg-damaged mite as a consequence of grooming behaviour; right regular dorsal dimples on the mite dorsal idiosoma. Scale bars = 0.5 mm
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3105231&req=5

Fig1: Left leg-damaged mite as a consequence of grooming behaviour; right regular dorsal dimples on the mite dorsal idiosoma. Scale bars = 0.5 mm
Mentions: Honey bee workers detached the mites with their mandibles and injured their legs. As a result of the grooming behaviour, two or more mite legs were removed. In some samples, most of the mite legs were removed (Fig. 1). Most damage to mite legs (2.7% on average) was found in Qazvin province, whereas damage to mite legs was 0.6% in Isfahan, 0.9% in Tehran and 0% in Markazi.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: These colonies were part of the National Honey bee Breeding Program that resulted in province-specific races.The results did not show any statistical differences between the colonies within provinces for injuries to mites, but there were some differences among province-specific lines.There were also some regular dorsal dimples on dorsal idiosoma of the mites that were placed in categories separate from mites damaged by bees.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal Ecology, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. masoud.mortazavi@falw.vu.nl

ABSTRACT
The frequency of damaged Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman (Mesostigmata: Varroidae) found on the bottom board of hives of the honey bee, Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae) has been used as an indicator of the degree of tolerance or resistance of honey bee colonies against mites. However, it is not clear that this measure is adequate. These injuries should be separated from regular dorsal dimples that have a developmental origin. To investigate damage to Varroa mites and regular dorsal dimples, 32 honey bee (A. mellifera) colonies were selected from four Iranian provinces: Isfahan, Markazi, Qazvin, and Tehran. These colonies were part of the National Honey bee Breeding Program that resulted in province-specific races. In April, Varroa mites were collected from heavily infested colonies and used to infest the 32 experimental colonies. In August, 20 of these colonies were selected (five colonies from each province). Adult bees from these colonies were placed in cages and after introducing mites, damaged mites were collected from each cage every day. The average percentage of injured mites ranged from 0.6 to 3.0% in four provinces. The results did not show any statistical differences between the colonies within provinces for injuries to mites, but there were some differences among province-specific lines. Two kinds of injuries to the mites were observed: injuries to legs and pedipalps, and injuries to other parts of the body. There were also some regular dorsal dimples on dorsal idiosoma of the mites that were placed in categories separate from mites damaged by bees. This type of classification helps identifying damage to mites and comparing them with developmental origin symptoms, and may provide criteria for selecting bees tolerant or resistant to this mite.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus