Limits...
Scaling behavior of human locomotor activity amplitude: association with bipolar disorder.

Indic P, Salvatore P, Maggini C, Ghidini S, Ferraro G, Baldessarini RJ, Murray G - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: Scale invariance is a feature of complex biological systems, and abnormality of multi-scale behaviour may serve as an indicator of pathology.The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is a major node in central neural networks responsible for regulating multi-scale behaviour in measures of human locomotor activity.A proposed index of scaling behaviour (Vulnerability Index [VI]) derived from such data distinguished between: [i] healthy subjects at high versus low risk of mood disorders; [ii] currently clinically stable BD patients versus matched controls; and [iii] among clinical states in BD patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States of America. Premananda.Indic@umassmed.edu

ABSTRACT
Scale invariance is a feature of complex biological systems, and abnormality of multi-scale behaviour may serve as an indicator of pathology. The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is a major node in central neural networks responsible for regulating multi-scale behaviour in measures of human locomotor activity. SCN also is implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD) or manic-depressive illness, a severe, episodic disorder of mood, cognition and behaviour. Here, we investigated scaling behaviour in actigraphically recorded human motility data for potential indicators of BD, particularly its manic phase. A proposed index of scaling behaviour (Vulnerability Index [VI]) derived from such data distinguished between: [i] healthy subjects at high versus low risk of mood disorders; [ii] currently clinically stable BD patients versus matched controls; and [iii] among clinical states in BD patients.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean (±SEM) computed vulnerability index (VI) values associated with various mood states of patients meeting DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for type-I BD.VI rises consistently and significantly with increasing manic features, from major depression, through mild depression or dysthymia, subclinical or mild mixed manic-depression, hypomania, mixed major manic-depressive states, to current mania-all in BD patients.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3105113&req=5

pone-0020650-g006: Mean (±SEM) computed vulnerability index (VI) values associated with various mood states of patients meeting DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for type-I BD.VI rises consistently and significantly with increasing manic features, from major depression, through mild depression or dysthymia, subclinical or mild mixed manic-depression, hypomania, mixed major manic-depressive states, to current mania-all in BD patients.

Mentions: Importantly, regression analyses found no correlation of VI with depressive symptom ratings (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HDRS] score or self-rated depression F [df = 3;79] = 2.32, and F [df = 3;76] = 1.21 both p>0.05). However, there was a significant increase in mean VI values across mood-states, ranking: major depression < minor depression < euthymia < minor mixed-states < hypomania < major mixed-states < mania (Figure 6).


Scaling behavior of human locomotor activity amplitude: association with bipolar disorder.

Indic P, Salvatore P, Maggini C, Ghidini S, Ferraro G, Baldessarini RJ, Murray G - PLoS ONE (2011)

Mean (±SEM) computed vulnerability index (VI) values associated with various mood states of patients meeting DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for type-I BD.VI rises consistently and significantly with increasing manic features, from major depression, through mild depression or dysthymia, subclinical or mild mixed manic-depression, hypomania, mixed major manic-depressive states, to current mania-all in BD patients.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3105113&req=5

pone-0020650-g006: Mean (±SEM) computed vulnerability index (VI) values associated with various mood states of patients meeting DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for type-I BD.VI rises consistently and significantly with increasing manic features, from major depression, through mild depression or dysthymia, subclinical or mild mixed manic-depression, hypomania, mixed major manic-depressive states, to current mania-all in BD patients.
Mentions: Importantly, regression analyses found no correlation of VI with depressive symptom ratings (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HDRS] score or self-rated depression F [df = 3;79] = 2.32, and F [df = 3;76] = 1.21 both p>0.05). However, there was a significant increase in mean VI values across mood-states, ranking: major depression < minor depression < euthymia < minor mixed-states < hypomania < major mixed-states < mania (Figure 6).

Bottom Line: Scale invariance is a feature of complex biological systems, and abnormality of multi-scale behaviour may serve as an indicator of pathology.The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is a major node in central neural networks responsible for regulating multi-scale behaviour in measures of human locomotor activity.A proposed index of scaling behaviour (Vulnerability Index [VI]) derived from such data distinguished between: [i] healthy subjects at high versus low risk of mood disorders; [ii] currently clinically stable BD patients versus matched controls; and [iii] among clinical states in BD patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States of America. Premananda.Indic@umassmed.edu

ABSTRACT
Scale invariance is a feature of complex biological systems, and abnormality of multi-scale behaviour may serve as an indicator of pathology. The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is a major node in central neural networks responsible for regulating multi-scale behaviour in measures of human locomotor activity. SCN also is implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD) or manic-depressive illness, a severe, episodic disorder of mood, cognition and behaviour. Here, we investigated scaling behaviour in actigraphically recorded human motility data for potential indicators of BD, particularly its manic phase. A proposed index of scaling behaviour (Vulnerability Index [VI]) derived from such data distinguished between: [i] healthy subjects at high versus low risk of mood disorders; [ii] currently clinically stable BD patients versus matched controls; and [iii] among clinical states in BD patients.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus