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A collaborative brain-computer interface for improving human performance.

Wang Y, Jung TP - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: In a demonstration system using the Voting method, the classification accuracy of predicting movement directions (reaching left vs. reaching right) was enhanced substantially from 66% to 80%, 88%, 93%, and 95% as the numbers of subjects increased from 1 to 5, 10, 15, and 20, respectively.Furthermore, the decision of reaching direction could be made around 100-250 ms earlier than the subject's actual motor response by decoding the ERP activities arising mainly from the posterior parietal cortex (PPC), which are related to the processing of visuomotor transmission.Taken together, these results suggest that a collaborative BCI can effectively fuse brain activities of a group of people to improve the overall performance of natural human behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience, Institute for Neural Computation, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California, United States of America. yijun@sccn.ucsd.edu

ABSTRACT
Electroencephalogram (EEG) based brain-computer interfaces (BCI) have been studied since the 1970s. Currently, the main focus of BCI research lies on the clinical use, which aims to provide a new communication channel to patients with motor disabilities to improve their quality of life. However, the BCI technology can also be used to improve human performance for normal healthy users. Although this application has been proposed for a long time, little progress has been made in real-world practices due to technical limits of EEG. To overcome the bottleneck of low single-user BCI performance, this study proposes a collaborative paradigm to improve overall BCI performance by integrating information from multiple users. To test the feasibility of a collaborative BCI, this study quantitatively compares the classification accuracies of collaborative and single-user BCI applied to the EEG data collected from 20 subjects in a movement-planning experiment. This study also explores three different methods for fusing and analyzing EEG data from multiple subjects: (1) Event-related potentials (ERP) averaging, (2) Feature concatenating, and (3) Voting. In a demonstration system using the Voting method, the classification accuracy of predicting movement directions (reaching left vs. reaching right) was enhanced substantially from 66% to 80%, 88%, 93%, and 95% as the numbers of subjects increased from 1 to 5, 10, 15, and 20, respectively. Furthermore, the decision of reaching direction could be made around 100-250 ms earlier than the subject's actual motor response by decoding the ERP activities arising mainly from the posterior parietal cortex (PPC), which are related to the processing of visuomotor transmission. Taken together, these results suggest that a collaborative BCI can effectively fuse brain activities of a group of people to improve the overall performance of natural human behavior.

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System paradigm of a collaborative BCI.
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pone-0020422-g001: System paradigm of a collaborative BCI.

Mentions: A collaborative BCI and a conventional BCI differ in many respects. A conventional BCI mainly aims to help the individual with motor disability to communication with the environment, whereas a collaborative BCI is specifically designed for improving human performance of healthy users. The basic design and operation of a collaborative BCI is shown in Figure 1. Similar to a conventional BCI [1], a collaborative BCI consists of three major parts: a data-recording module, a signal processing module, and a command translation module. Consequently, there are three major procedures in system operations. First, brain signals from a group of users are acquired by multiple EEG recording devices, and then are synchronized with common environmental events. Second, integrated EEG and event data are processed for extracting features for decoding users' intentions. Third, extracted features are directly translated to operation commands, which can also be used to provide sensory feedbacks to the users. Compared to a single-subject BCI, the complexity of system input from multiple users will lead to technical challenges in both data recording and signal processing procedures.


A collaborative brain-computer interface for improving human performance.

Wang Y, Jung TP - PLoS ONE (2011)

System paradigm of a collaborative BCI.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3105048&req=5

pone-0020422-g001: System paradigm of a collaborative BCI.
Mentions: A collaborative BCI and a conventional BCI differ in many respects. A conventional BCI mainly aims to help the individual with motor disability to communication with the environment, whereas a collaborative BCI is specifically designed for improving human performance of healthy users. The basic design and operation of a collaborative BCI is shown in Figure 1. Similar to a conventional BCI [1], a collaborative BCI consists of three major parts: a data-recording module, a signal processing module, and a command translation module. Consequently, there are three major procedures in system operations. First, brain signals from a group of users are acquired by multiple EEG recording devices, and then are synchronized with common environmental events. Second, integrated EEG and event data are processed for extracting features for decoding users' intentions. Third, extracted features are directly translated to operation commands, which can also be used to provide sensory feedbacks to the users. Compared to a single-subject BCI, the complexity of system input from multiple users will lead to technical challenges in both data recording and signal processing procedures.

Bottom Line: In a demonstration system using the Voting method, the classification accuracy of predicting movement directions (reaching left vs. reaching right) was enhanced substantially from 66% to 80%, 88%, 93%, and 95% as the numbers of subjects increased from 1 to 5, 10, 15, and 20, respectively.Furthermore, the decision of reaching direction could be made around 100-250 ms earlier than the subject's actual motor response by decoding the ERP activities arising mainly from the posterior parietal cortex (PPC), which are related to the processing of visuomotor transmission.Taken together, these results suggest that a collaborative BCI can effectively fuse brain activities of a group of people to improve the overall performance of natural human behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience, Institute for Neural Computation, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California, United States of America. yijun@sccn.ucsd.edu

ABSTRACT
Electroencephalogram (EEG) based brain-computer interfaces (BCI) have been studied since the 1970s. Currently, the main focus of BCI research lies on the clinical use, which aims to provide a new communication channel to patients with motor disabilities to improve their quality of life. However, the BCI technology can also be used to improve human performance for normal healthy users. Although this application has been proposed for a long time, little progress has been made in real-world practices due to technical limits of EEG. To overcome the bottleneck of low single-user BCI performance, this study proposes a collaborative paradigm to improve overall BCI performance by integrating information from multiple users. To test the feasibility of a collaborative BCI, this study quantitatively compares the classification accuracies of collaborative and single-user BCI applied to the EEG data collected from 20 subjects in a movement-planning experiment. This study also explores three different methods for fusing and analyzing EEG data from multiple subjects: (1) Event-related potentials (ERP) averaging, (2) Feature concatenating, and (3) Voting. In a demonstration system using the Voting method, the classification accuracy of predicting movement directions (reaching left vs. reaching right) was enhanced substantially from 66% to 80%, 88%, 93%, and 95% as the numbers of subjects increased from 1 to 5, 10, 15, and 20, respectively. Furthermore, the decision of reaching direction could be made around 100-250 ms earlier than the subject's actual motor response by decoding the ERP activities arising mainly from the posterior parietal cortex (PPC), which are related to the processing of visuomotor transmission. Taken together, these results suggest that a collaborative BCI can effectively fuse brain activities of a group of people to improve the overall performance of natural human behavior.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus