Limits...
Phylogenetic relationships in Pterodroma petrels are obscured by recent secondary contact and hybridization.

Brown RM, Jordan WC, Faulkes CG, Jones CG, Bugoni L, Tatayah V, Palma RL, Nichols RA - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: The classification of petrels (Pterodroma spp.) from Round Island, near Mauritius in the Indian Ocean, has confounded researchers since their discovery in 1948.The breakdown of species boundaries in Round Island petrels followed environmental change (deforestation and changes in species composition due to hunting) within their overlapping ranges.Such multi-species interactions have implications not only for conservation, but also for our understanding of the processes of evolutionary diversification and speciation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, London, United Kingdom. rthbwn@bas.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
The classification of petrels (Pterodroma spp.) from Round Island, near Mauritius in the Indian Ocean, has confounded researchers since their discovery in 1948. In this study we investigate the relationships between Round Island petrels and their closest relatives using evidence from mitochondrial DNA sequence data and ectoparasites. Far from providing clear delimitation of species boundaries, our results reveal that hybridization among species on Round Island has led to genetic leakage between populations from different ocean basins. The most common species on the island, Pterodroma arminjoniana, appears to be hybridizing with two rarer species (P. heraldica and P. neglecta), subverting the reproductive isolation of all three and allowing gene flow. P. heraldica and P. neglecta breed sympatrically in the Pacific Ocean, where P. arminjoniana is absent, but no record of hybridization between these two exists and they remain phenotypically distinct. The breakdown of species boundaries in Round Island petrels followed environmental change (deforestation and changes in species composition due to hunting) within their overlapping ranges. Such multi-species interactions have implications not only for conservation, but also for our understanding of the processes of evolutionary diversification and speciation.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Statistical parsimony network of haplotypes from Round Island,                            Trindade and Pacific populations of Pterodroma.Circles are proportional to the total number of individuals showing each                            haplotype, haplotype name is given next to each circle, coloured areas                            show the proportion of each haplotype assigned to each population,                            numbers show number of individuals. Connecting lines represent a single                            base substitution and small filled circles represent hypothetical                            unsampled haplotypes.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3105042&req=5

pone-0020350-g003: Statistical parsimony network of haplotypes from Round Island, Trindade and Pacific populations of Pterodroma.Circles are proportional to the total number of individuals showing each haplotype, haplotype name is given next to each circle, coloured areas show the proportion of each haplotype assigned to each population, numbers show number of individuals. Connecting lines represent a single base substitution and small filled circles represent hypothetical unsampled haplotypes.

Mentions: The complex relationship between P. arminjoniana, P. neglecta, P. heraldica and P. atrata can be visualised using a mitochondrial-DNA haplotype network (Fig. 3). Haplotypes from dark-shafted Round Island birds (pale blue) are spread throughout the network, clustering with Trindade P. arminjoniana (dark blue), Pacific P. neglecta (red), Pacific P. heraldica (yellow) and white-shafted Round Island birds (pink). However, haplotypes from Atlantic P. arminjoniana (dark blue) are restricted to one area of the network, as are haplotypes from Pacific P. neglecta (red). P. atrata haplotypes (green) are not shared with any other group and are centrally located in the network, suggesting that they are ancestral to the other haplotype groups.


Phylogenetic relationships in Pterodroma petrels are obscured by recent secondary contact and hybridization.

Brown RM, Jordan WC, Faulkes CG, Jones CG, Bugoni L, Tatayah V, Palma RL, Nichols RA - PLoS ONE (2011)

Statistical parsimony network of haplotypes from Round Island,                            Trindade and Pacific populations of Pterodroma.Circles are proportional to the total number of individuals showing each                            haplotype, haplotype name is given next to each circle, coloured areas                            show the proportion of each haplotype assigned to each population,                            numbers show number of individuals. Connecting lines represent a single                            base substitution and small filled circles represent hypothetical                            unsampled haplotypes.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3105042&req=5

pone-0020350-g003: Statistical parsimony network of haplotypes from Round Island, Trindade and Pacific populations of Pterodroma.Circles are proportional to the total number of individuals showing each haplotype, haplotype name is given next to each circle, coloured areas show the proportion of each haplotype assigned to each population, numbers show number of individuals. Connecting lines represent a single base substitution and small filled circles represent hypothetical unsampled haplotypes.
Mentions: The complex relationship between P. arminjoniana, P. neglecta, P. heraldica and P. atrata can be visualised using a mitochondrial-DNA haplotype network (Fig. 3). Haplotypes from dark-shafted Round Island birds (pale blue) are spread throughout the network, clustering with Trindade P. arminjoniana (dark blue), Pacific P. neglecta (red), Pacific P. heraldica (yellow) and white-shafted Round Island birds (pink). However, haplotypes from Atlantic P. arminjoniana (dark blue) are restricted to one area of the network, as are haplotypes from Pacific P. neglecta (red). P. atrata haplotypes (green) are not shared with any other group and are centrally located in the network, suggesting that they are ancestral to the other haplotype groups.

Bottom Line: The classification of petrels (Pterodroma spp.) from Round Island, near Mauritius in the Indian Ocean, has confounded researchers since their discovery in 1948.The breakdown of species boundaries in Round Island petrels followed environmental change (deforestation and changes in species composition due to hunting) within their overlapping ranges.Such multi-species interactions have implications not only for conservation, but also for our understanding of the processes of evolutionary diversification and speciation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, London, United Kingdom. rthbwn@bas.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
The classification of petrels (Pterodroma spp.) from Round Island, near Mauritius in the Indian Ocean, has confounded researchers since their discovery in 1948. In this study we investigate the relationships between Round Island petrels and their closest relatives using evidence from mitochondrial DNA sequence data and ectoparasites. Far from providing clear delimitation of species boundaries, our results reveal that hybridization among species on Round Island has led to genetic leakage between populations from different ocean basins. The most common species on the island, Pterodroma arminjoniana, appears to be hybridizing with two rarer species (P. heraldica and P. neglecta), subverting the reproductive isolation of all three and allowing gene flow. P. heraldica and P. neglecta breed sympatrically in the Pacific Ocean, where P. arminjoniana is absent, but no record of hybridization between these two exists and they remain phenotypically distinct. The breakdown of species boundaries in Round Island petrels followed environmental change (deforestation and changes in species composition due to hunting) within their overlapping ranges. Such multi-species interactions have implications not only for conservation, but also for our understanding of the processes of evolutionary diversification and speciation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus