Limits...
A successful crayfish invader is capable of facultative parthenogenesis: a novel reproductive mode in decapod crustaceans.

Buřič M, Hulák M, Kouba A, Petrusek A, Kozák P - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: As shown by analysis of seven microsatellite loci, crayfish females kept physically separated from males produced genetically homogeneous offspring identical with maternal individuals; this suggests they reproduced by apomixis, unlike those females which mated with males and had a diverse offspring.Further research is needed to clarify what environmental conditions are necessary for a switch to parthenogenesis in O. limosus, and what role it plays in natural crayfish populations.However, if such reproductive plasticity is present in other cambarid crayfish species, it may contribute to the overwhelming invasive success of this group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Fisheries and Protection of Waters, South Bohemian Research Center of Aquaculture and Biodiversity of Hydrocenoses and Research Institute of Fish Culture and Hydrobiology, University of South Bohemia in Èeské Budìjovice, Vodòany, Czech Republic. buric@vurh.jcu.cz

ABSTRACT
Biological invasions are impacting biota worldwide, and explaining why some taxa tend to become invasive is of major scientific interest. North American crayfish species, particularly of the family Cambaridae, are prominent invaders in freshwaters, defying the "tens rule" which states that only a minority of species introduced to new regions become established, and only a minority of those become invasive and pests. So far, success of cambarid invaders has largely been attributed to rapid maturation, high reproductive output, aggressiveness, and tolerance to pollution. We provide experimental evidence that females of one cambarid species particularly widespread in Europe, the spiny-cheek crayfish Orconectes limosus, are capable of facultative parthenogenesis. Such reproductive mode has never before been recognized in decapods, the most diverse crustacean order. As shown by analysis of seven microsatellite loci, crayfish females kept physically separated from males produced genetically homogeneous offspring identical with maternal individuals; this suggests they reproduced by apomixis, unlike those females which mated with males and had a diverse offspring. Further research is needed to clarify what environmental conditions are necessary for a switch to parthenogenesis in O. limosus, and what role it plays in natural crayfish populations. However, if such reproductive plasticity is present in other cambarid crayfish species, it may contribute to the overwhelming invasive success of this group.

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Mature female of the spiny-cheek crayfish Orconectes limosus from the Černovický brook (Czech Republic), a source population for our experiments.There was no difference in phenotype of females in the different experimental groups.
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pone-0020281-g001: Mature female of the spiny-cheek crayfish Orconectes limosus from the Černovický brook (Czech Republic), a source population for our experiments.There was no difference in phenotype of females in the different experimental groups.

Mentions: Crayfish are ecologically important benthic macroinvertebrates, and often act as keystone species in both standing and running waters [1]. Since they are also economically important, many crayfish species have been introduced to regions outside of their original distributions, both within and between continents. The introduction of North American crayfish to Europe has been particularly successful, but has also had serious conservational consequences, including the decimation of local crayfish populations by the crayfish plague pathogen introduced with them [2]. The first of those species, the spiny-cheek crayfish Orconectes limosus (Figure 1), became successfully established from a batch of 90 individuals released in 1890 to a fishpond in Pomerania (presently western Poland), and has since colonized at least 20 European countries [2], [3]. Other American crayfish have since been introduced to Europe, resulting in at least eight to nine species established at present [2], [4].


A successful crayfish invader is capable of facultative parthenogenesis: a novel reproductive mode in decapod crustaceans.

Buřič M, Hulák M, Kouba A, Petrusek A, Kozák P - PLoS ONE (2011)

Mature female of the spiny-cheek crayfish Orconectes limosus from the Černovický brook (Czech Republic), a source population for our experiments.There was no difference in phenotype of females in the different experimental groups.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3105005&req=5

pone-0020281-g001: Mature female of the spiny-cheek crayfish Orconectes limosus from the Černovický brook (Czech Republic), a source population for our experiments.There was no difference in phenotype of females in the different experimental groups.
Mentions: Crayfish are ecologically important benthic macroinvertebrates, and often act as keystone species in both standing and running waters [1]. Since they are also economically important, many crayfish species have been introduced to regions outside of their original distributions, both within and between continents. The introduction of North American crayfish to Europe has been particularly successful, but has also had serious conservational consequences, including the decimation of local crayfish populations by the crayfish plague pathogen introduced with them [2]. The first of those species, the spiny-cheek crayfish Orconectes limosus (Figure 1), became successfully established from a batch of 90 individuals released in 1890 to a fishpond in Pomerania (presently western Poland), and has since colonized at least 20 European countries [2], [3]. Other American crayfish have since been introduced to Europe, resulting in at least eight to nine species established at present [2], [4].

Bottom Line: As shown by analysis of seven microsatellite loci, crayfish females kept physically separated from males produced genetically homogeneous offspring identical with maternal individuals; this suggests they reproduced by apomixis, unlike those females which mated with males and had a diverse offspring.Further research is needed to clarify what environmental conditions are necessary for a switch to parthenogenesis in O. limosus, and what role it plays in natural crayfish populations.However, if such reproductive plasticity is present in other cambarid crayfish species, it may contribute to the overwhelming invasive success of this group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Fisheries and Protection of Waters, South Bohemian Research Center of Aquaculture and Biodiversity of Hydrocenoses and Research Institute of Fish Culture and Hydrobiology, University of South Bohemia in Èeské Budìjovice, Vodòany, Czech Republic. buric@vurh.jcu.cz

ABSTRACT
Biological invasions are impacting biota worldwide, and explaining why some taxa tend to become invasive is of major scientific interest. North American crayfish species, particularly of the family Cambaridae, are prominent invaders in freshwaters, defying the "tens rule" which states that only a minority of species introduced to new regions become established, and only a minority of those become invasive and pests. So far, success of cambarid invaders has largely been attributed to rapid maturation, high reproductive output, aggressiveness, and tolerance to pollution. We provide experimental evidence that females of one cambarid species particularly widespread in Europe, the spiny-cheek crayfish Orconectes limosus, are capable of facultative parthenogenesis. Such reproductive mode has never before been recognized in decapods, the most diverse crustacean order. As shown by analysis of seven microsatellite loci, crayfish females kept physically separated from males produced genetically homogeneous offspring identical with maternal individuals; this suggests they reproduced by apomixis, unlike those females which mated with males and had a diverse offspring. Further research is needed to clarify what environmental conditions are necessary for a switch to parthenogenesis in O. limosus, and what role it plays in natural crayfish populations. However, if such reproductive plasticity is present in other cambarid crayfish species, it may contribute to the overwhelming invasive success of this group.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus