Limits...
Multiple Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus strains are associated with disease outbreaks in Sudan, 2008-2009.

Aradaib IE, Erickson BR, Karsany MS, Khristova ML, Elageb RM, Mohamed ME, Nichol ST - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2011)

Bottom Line: Since 2008, several sporadic cases and nosocomial outbreaks associated with high case-fatality have been reported in villages and rural hospitals in the region.In the present study, we describe a cluster of cases occurring in June 2009 in Dunkop village, Abyei District, South Kordufan, Sudan.Seven CCHF cases were involved in the outbreak; however, clinical specimens could be collected from only two patients, both of whom were confirmed as acute CCHF cases using CCHF-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Khartoum, Khartoum North, Sudan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) activity has recently been detected in the Kordufan region of Sudan. Since 2008, several sporadic cases and nosocomial outbreaks associated with high case-fatality have been reported in villages and rural hospitals in the region.

Principal findings: In the present study, we describe a cluster of cases occurring in June 2009 in Dunkop village, Abyei District, South Kordufan, Sudan. Seven CCHF cases were involved in the outbreak; however, clinical specimens could be collected from only two patients, both of whom were confirmed as acute CCHF cases using CCHF-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Phylogenetic analysis of the complete S, M, and L segment sequences places the Abyei strain of CCHF virus in Group III, a virus group containing strains from various countries across Africa, including Sudan, South Africa, Mauritania, and Nigeria. The Abyei strain detected in 2009 is genetically distinct from the recently described 2008 Sudanese CCHF virus strains (Al-fulah 3 and 4), and the Abyei strain S and L segments closely match those of CCHF virus strain ArD39554 from Mauritania.

Conclusions: The present investigation illustrates that multiple CCHF virus lineages are circulating in the Kordufan region of Sudan and are associated with recent outbreaks of the disease occurring during 2008-2009.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Phylogenetic relationship of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus full length M segments.Phylogenetic relationship of the M segment sequence of the CCHF virus Abyei and Al-fulah strains relative to previously published sequences was carried out using GARLI (v0.96b8) [18], with default settings to generate a maximum likelihood tree with bootstrap support values from 1000 replicates. The 50% majority rule tree is depicted. Each strain is listed by its location, strain name, and year of isolation when available with the Sudanese strains bolded.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3104971&req=5

pntd-0001159-g003: Phylogenetic relationship of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus full length M segments.Phylogenetic relationship of the M segment sequence of the CCHF virus Abyei and Al-fulah strains relative to previously published sequences was carried out using GARLI (v0.96b8) [18], with default settings to generate a maximum likelihood tree with bootstrap support values from 1000 replicates. The 50% majority rule tree is depicted. Each strain is listed by its location, strain name, and year of isolation when available with the Sudanese strains bolded.

Mentions: While viruses from the Al-fulah 2008 and Abyei 2009 outbreaks are both located in Group III, the Abyei strain was genetically distinct from the Al-fulah strain (Figures 2, 3, and 4). The two Sudanese strains both displayed closer genetic relationships with other Group III viruses from elsewhere in Africa than with one another. The S and L segments of the Abyei strain matched most closely with those of the Group III Mauritanian virus strain ArD39554 (Figures 2 & 4). This virus had been shown previously to be an M segment reassortant virus with the virus M segment being the sole representative of a highly unique Group VII [15], [19]. The M segment of the Abyei strain matched another Group III virus, namely the Nigerian IbAr10200 strain, consistent with the Abyei virus not being a reassortant (Figure 3). The Al-fulah strain genome segments matched most closely to other Group III viruses from South Africa. No evidence of reassortment or recombination was found for either of the Sudanese CCHFV strains [9], [13], [20]–[21].


Multiple Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus strains are associated with disease outbreaks in Sudan, 2008-2009.

Aradaib IE, Erickson BR, Karsany MS, Khristova ML, Elageb RM, Mohamed ME, Nichol ST - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2011)

Phylogenetic relationship of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus full length M segments.Phylogenetic relationship of the M segment sequence of the CCHF virus Abyei and Al-fulah strains relative to previously published sequences was carried out using GARLI (v0.96b8) [18], with default settings to generate a maximum likelihood tree with bootstrap support values from 1000 replicates. The 50% majority rule tree is depicted. Each strain is listed by its location, strain name, and year of isolation when available with the Sudanese strains bolded.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3104971&req=5

pntd-0001159-g003: Phylogenetic relationship of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus full length M segments.Phylogenetic relationship of the M segment sequence of the CCHF virus Abyei and Al-fulah strains relative to previously published sequences was carried out using GARLI (v0.96b8) [18], with default settings to generate a maximum likelihood tree with bootstrap support values from 1000 replicates. The 50% majority rule tree is depicted. Each strain is listed by its location, strain name, and year of isolation when available with the Sudanese strains bolded.
Mentions: While viruses from the Al-fulah 2008 and Abyei 2009 outbreaks are both located in Group III, the Abyei strain was genetically distinct from the Al-fulah strain (Figures 2, 3, and 4). The two Sudanese strains both displayed closer genetic relationships with other Group III viruses from elsewhere in Africa than with one another. The S and L segments of the Abyei strain matched most closely with those of the Group III Mauritanian virus strain ArD39554 (Figures 2 & 4). This virus had been shown previously to be an M segment reassortant virus with the virus M segment being the sole representative of a highly unique Group VII [15], [19]. The M segment of the Abyei strain matched another Group III virus, namely the Nigerian IbAr10200 strain, consistent with the Abyei virus not being a reassortant (Figure 3). The Al-fulah strain genome segments matched most closely to other Group III viruses from South Africa. No evidence of reassortment or recombination was found for either of the Sudanese CCHFV strains [9], [13], [20]–[21].

Bottom Line: Since 2008, several sporadic cases and nosocomial outbreaks associated with high case-fatality have been reported in villages and rural hospitals in the region.In the present study, we describe a cluster of cases occurring in June 2009 in Dunkop village, Abyei District, South Kordufan, Sudan.Seven CCHF cases were involved in the outbreak; however, clinical specimens could be collected from only two patients, both of whom were confirmed as acute CCHF cases using CCHF-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Khartoum, Khartoum North, Sudan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) activity has recently been detected in the Kordufan region of Sudan. Since 2008, several sporadic cases and nosocomial outbreaks associated with high case-fatality have been reported in villages and rural hospitals in the region.

Principal findings: In the present study, we describe a cluster of cases occurring in June 2009 in Dunkop village, Abyei District, South Kordufan, Sudan. Seven CCHF cases were involved in the outbreak; however, clinical specimens could be collected from only two patients, both of whom were confirmed as acute CCHF cases using CCHF-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Phylogenetic analysis of the complete S, M, and L segment sequences places the Abyei strain of CCHF virus in Group III, a virus group containing strains from various countries across Africa, including Sudan, South Africa, Mauritania, and Nigeria. The Abyei strain detected in 2009 is genetically distinct from the recently described 2008 Sudanese CCHF virus strains (Al-fulah 3 and 4), and the Abyei strain S and L segments closely match those of CCHF virus strain ArD39554 from Mauritania.

Conclusions: The present investigation illustrates that multiple CCHF virus lineages are circulating in the Kordufan region of Sudan and are associated with recent outbreaks of the disease occurring during 2008-2009.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus