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Increased serum levels of anti-ganglioside M1 auto-antibodies in autistic children: relation to the disease severity.

Mostafa GA, Al-Ayadhi LY - J Neuroinflammation (2011)

Bottom Line: Autoimmunity to the central nervous system (CNS) may play a pathogenic role in a subgroup of patients with autism.Also, their levels had significant positive correlations with the degree of the severity of autism.Thus, autism may be, in part, one of the pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Autism Research and Treatment Center, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. hafezg@softhome.net

ABSTRACT

Background: Autoimmunity to the central nervous system (CNS) may play a pathogenic role in a subgroup of patients with autism. This study aimed to investigate the frequency of serum anti-ganglioside M1 auto-antibodies, as indicators of the presence of autoimmunity to CNS, in a group of autistic children. We are the first to measure the relationship between these antibodies and the degree of the severity of autism.

Methods: Serum anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies were measured, by ELISA, in 54 autistic children, aged between 4 and 12 years, in comparison to 54 healthy-matched children. Autistic severity was assessed by using the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS).

Results: Autistic children had significantly higher serum levels of anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies than healthy children (P < 0.001). The seropositivity of anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies was found in 74% (40/54) of autistic children. Serum levels of anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies were significantly higher in autistic children with severe autism (63%) than those with mild to moderate autism (37%), P = 0.001. Moreover, serum anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies had significant positive correlations with CARS (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: Serum levels of anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies were increased in many autistic children. Also, their levels had significant positive correlations with the degree of the severity of autism. Thus, autism may be, in part, one of the pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders. Further wide-scale studies are warranted to shed light on the possible etiopathogenic role of anti-ganglioside M1 auto-antibodies in autism. The role of immunotherapy in autistic patients who have increased serum levels of anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies should also be studied.

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Serum levels of anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies in relation to the degree of the severity of autism. Median values are represented as horizontal bars.
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Figure 1: Serum levels of anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies in relation to the degree of the severity of autism. Median values are represented as horizontal bars.

Mentions: Children with severe autism had significantly higher serum levels of anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies [median (IQR) = 592 (491) ng/ml] than patients with mild to moderate autism [median (IQR) = 278.5 (321) ng/ml], P = 0.001 (figure 1). In addition, the frequency of seropositivity of anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies was significantly higher in patients with severe autism (85%) than children with mild to moderate autism (55%), P = 0.01 (table 2). Moreover, serum levels of anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies of autistic patients had significant positive correlations with CARS, P < 0.001 (figure 2).


Increased serum levels of anti-ganglioside M1 auto-antibodies in autistic children: relation to the disease severity.

Mostafa GA, Al-Ayadhi LY - J Neuroinflammation (2011)

Serum levels of anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies in relation to the degree of the severity of autism. Median values are represented as horizontal bars.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3104945&req=5

Figure 1: Serum levels of anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies in relation to the degree of the severity of autism. Median values are represented as horizontal bars.
Mentions: Children with severe autism had significantly higher serum levels of anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies [median (IQR) = 592 (491) ng/ml] than patients with mild to moderate autism [median (IQR) = 278.5 (321) ng/ml], P = 0.001 (figure 1). In addition, the frequency of seropositivity of anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies was significantly higher in patients with severe autism (85%) than children with mild to moderate autism (55%), P = 0.01 (table 2). Moreover, serum levels of anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies of autistic patients had significant positive correlations with CARS, P < 0.001 (figure 2).

Bottom Line: Autoimmunity to the central nervous system (CNS) may play a pathogenic role in a subgroup of patients with autism.Also, their levels had significant positive correlations with the degree of the severity of autism.Thus, autism may be, in part, one of the pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Autism Research and Treatment Center, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. hafezg@softhome.net

ABSTRACT

Background: Autoimmunity to the central nervous system (CNS) may play a pathogenic role in a subgroup of patients with autism. This study aimed to investigate the frequency of serum anti-ganglioside M1 auto-antibodies, as indicators of the presence of autoimmunity to CNS, in a group of autistic children. We are the first to measure the relationship between these antibodies and the degree of the severity of autism.

Methods: Serum anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies were measured, by ELISA, in 54 autistic children, aged between 4 and 12 years, in comparison to 54 healthy-matched children. Autistic severity was assessed by using the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS).

Results: Autistic children had significantly higher serum levels of anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies than healthy children (P < 0.001). The seropositivity of anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies was found in 74% (40/54) of autistic children. Serum levels of anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies were significantly higher in autistic children with severe autism (63%) than those with mild to moderate autism (37%), P = 0.001. Moreover, serum anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies had significant positive correlations with CARS (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: Serum levels of anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies were increased in many autistic children. Also, their levels had significant positive correlations with the degree of the severity of autism. Thus, autism may be, in part, one of the pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders. Further wide-scale studies are warranted to shed light on the possible etiopathogenic role of anti-ganglioside M1 auto-antibodies in autism. The role of immunotherapy in autistic patients who have increased serum levels of anti-ganglioside M1 antibodies should also be studied.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus