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MaizeGDB: curation and outreach go hand-in-hand.

Schaeffer ML, Harper LC, Gardiner JM, Andorf CM, Campbell DA, Cannon EK, Sen TZ, Lawrence CJ - Database (Oxford) (2011)

Bottom Line: The MaizeGDB Team is relatively small, and relies heavily on the research community to provide data, nomenclature standards and most importantly, to recommend future directions, priorities and strategies.Key aspects of MaizeGDB's intimate interaction with the community are the co-location of curators with maize research groups in multiple locations across the USA as well as coordination with MaizeGDB's close partner, the Maize Genetics Cooperation--Stock Center.In this report, we describe how the MaizeGDB Team currently interacts with the maize research community and our plan for future interactions that will support updates to the functional and structural annotation of the B73 reference genome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: USDA-ARS Plant Genetics Research Unit and Division of Plant Sciences, Department of Agronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. mary.schaeffer@ars.usda.gov

ABSTRACT
First released in 1991 with the name MaizeDB, the Maize Genetics and Genomics Database, now MaizeGDB, celebrates its 20th anniversary this year. MaizeGDB has transitioned from a focus on comprehensive curation of the literature, genetic maps and stocks to a paradigm that accommodates the recent release of a reference maize genome sequence, multiple diverse maize genomes and sequence-based gene expression data sets. The MaizeGDB Team is relatively small, and relies heavily on the research community to provide data, nomenclature standards and most importantly, to recommend future directions, priorities and strategies. Key aspects of MaizeGDB's intimate interaction with the community are the co-location of curators with maize research groups in multiple locations across the USA as well as coordination with MaizeGDB's close partner, the Maize Genetics Cooperation--Stock Center. In this report, we describe how the MaizeGDB Team currently interacts with the maize research community and our plan for future interactions that will support updates to the functional and structural annotation of the B73 reference genome.

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The maize genetics cooperation, 1928–2009. The top timeline depicts the establishment of a Stock Center and Newsletter in 1928, followed by funding for MaizeDB in 1990, and then the 2009 release of the B73 reference genome sequence. The leftmost inset shows the participants of the first formal Maize Genetics Meeting, at Allerton, IL in 1959 [photograph courtesy Earl Patterson and the Newsletter (57)]. The color photograph [courtesy anonymous photographer, and the Newsletter (58) depicts the subset of the current maize research community that convened in 2007, at Allerton, IL to plan infrastructure needs. This 2007 meeting included representatives of MaizeGDB (CJL, MLS, Trent Seigfried).
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Figure 1: The maize genetics cooperation, 1928–2009. The top timeline depicts the establishment of a Stock Center and Newsletter in 1928, followed by funding for MaizeDB in 1990, and then the 2009 release of the B73 reference genome sequence. The leftmost inset shows the participants of the first formal Maize Genetics Meeting, at Allerton, IL in 1959 [photograph courtesy Earl Patterson and the Newsletter (57)]. The color photograph [courtesy anonymous photographer, and the Newsletter (58) depicts the subset of the current maize research community that convened in 2007, at Allerton, IL to plan infrastructure needs. This 2007 meeting included representatives of MaizeGDB (CJL, MLS, Trent Seigfried).

Mentions: The permanent staff for MaizeGDB is relatively small (five persons), and we rely heavily on the maize genetics community and other stakeholders, notably the Maize Genetics Executive Committee, http://www.maizegdb.org/mgec.php, the National Corn Growers Association (9) and the MaizeGDB Working Group (described below) for guidance and assistance. The maize community has a long history of cooperation that dates to the early part of the 20th century (10) and enthusiastically participates in community surveys to help in guiding MaizeGDB to address stakeholder needs (2). The maize community has been a major contributor to the NSF’s Plant Genome Research Program’s accomplishments from that program’s very beginnings, including laying substantial groundwork early on toward sequencing the maize genome (11). While community planning discussions are held in open forums at the Annual Maize Genetics Conference (this year in its 53rd year), smaller, more focused meetings are also held to identify community needs and set priorities. The most recent occurred in 2007 at Allerton Park, Illinois, http://www.maizegdb.org/AllertonReport.doc. Allerton has historic interest, as it was also the site of the first maize meeting (Figure 1). At MaizeGDB, we provide extensive outreach and other services to support continued development of the maize community, which are described in previous reports (4, 12–14) and in the accompanying Database (Oxford) article (Harper et al.)Figure 1.


MaizeGDB: curation and outreach go hand-in-hand.

Schaeffer ML, Harper LC, Gardiner JM, Andorf CM, Campbell DA, Cannon EK, Sen TZ, Lawrence CJ - Database (Oxford) (2011)

The maize genetics cooperation, 1928–2009. The top timeline depicts the establishment of a Stock Center and Newsletter in 1928, followed by funding for MaizeDB in 1990, and then the 2009 release of the B73 reference genome sequence. The leftmost inset shows the participants of the first formal Maize Genetics Meeting, at Allerton, IL in 1959 [photograph courtesy Earl Patterson and the Newsletter (57)]. The color photograph [courtesy anonymous photographer, and the Newsletter (58) depicts the subset of the current maize research community that convened in 2007, at Allerton, IL to plan infrastructure needs. This 2007 meeting included representatives of MaizeGDB (CJL, MLS, Trent Seigfried).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3104940&req=5

Figure 1: The maize genetics cooperation, 1928–2009. The top timeline depicts the establishment of a Stock Center and Newsletter in 1928, followed by funding for MaizeDB in 1990, and then the 2009 release of the B73 reference genome sequence. The leftmost inset shows the participants of the first formal Maize Genetics Meeting, at Allerton, IL in 1959 [photograph courtesy Earl Patterson and the Newsletter (57)]. The color photograph [courtesy anonymous photographer, and the Newsletter (58) depicts the subset of the current maize research community that convened in 2007, at Allerton, IL to plan infrastructure needs. This 2007 meeting included representatives of MaizeGDB (CJL, MLS, Trent Seigfried).
Mentions: The permanent staff for MaizeGDB is relatively small (five persons), and we rely heavily on the maize genetics community and other stakeholders, notably the Maize Genetics Executive Committee, http://www.maizegdb.org/mgec.php, the National Corn Growers Association (9) and the MaizeGDB Working Group (described below) for guidance and assistance. The maize community has a long history of cooperation that dates to the early part of the 20th century (10) and enthusiastically participates in community surveys to help in guiding MaizeGDB to address stakeholder needs (2). The maize community has been a major contributor to the NSF’s Plant Genome Research Program’s accomplishments from that program’s very beginnings, including laying substantial groundwork early on toward sequencing the maize genome (11). While community planning discussions are held in open forums at the Annual Maize Genetics Conference (this year in its 53rd year), smaller, more focused meetings are also held to identify community needs and set priorities. The most recent occurred in 2007 at Allerton Park, Illinois, http://www.maizegdb.org/AllertonReport.doc. Allerton has historic interest, as it was also the site of the first maize meeting (Figure 1). At MaizeGDB, we provide extensive outreach and other services to support continued development of the maize community, which are described in previous reports (4, 12–14) and in the accompanying Database (Oxford) article (Harper et al.)Figure 1.

Bottom Line: The MaizeGDB Team is relatively small, and relies heavily on the research community to provide data, nomenclature standards and most importantly, to recommend future directions, priorities and strategies.Key aspects of MaizeGDB's intimate interaction with the community are the co-location of curators with maize research groups in multiple locations across the USA as well as coordination with MaizeGDB's close partner, the Maize Genetics Cooperation--Stock Center.In this report, we describe how the MaizeGDB Team currently interacts with the maize research community and our plan for future interactions that will support updates to the functional and structural annotation of the B73 reference genome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: USDA-ARS Plant Genetics Research Unit and Division of Plant Sciences, Department of Agronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. mary.schaeffer@ars.usda.gov

ABSTRACT
First released in 1991 with the name MaizeDB, the Maize Genetics and Genomics Database, now MaizeGDB, celebrates its 20th anniversary this year. MaizeGDB has transitioned from a focus on comprehensive curation of the literature, genetic maps and stocks to a paradigm that accommodates the recent release of a reference maize genome sequence, multiple diverse maize genomes and sequence-based gene expression data sets. The MaizeGDB Team is relatively small, and relies heavily on the research community to provide data, nomenclature standards and most importantly, to recommend future directions, priorities and strategies. Key aspects of MaizeGDB's intimate interaction with the community are the co-location of curators with maize research groups in multiple locations across the USA as well as coordination with MaizeGDB's close partner, the Maize Genetics Cooperation--Stock Center. In this report, we describe how the MaizeGDB Team currently interacts with the maize research community and our plan for future interactions that will support updates to the functional and structural annotation of the B73 reference genome.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus