Limits...
The reality in the surveillance of breast cancer survivors-results of a patient survey.

Hans-Joachim S, Dorit L, Petra S, Ingo B, Steffen K, Alexander FP, Wilhelm BM, Margrit G, Ursula GP, Verena H, Michael U, Volker H - Breast Cancer (Auckl) (2008)

Bottom Line: The results of the survey can be summarized in two major categories: First, necessity for surveillance was affirmed by a majority (>95%), and 47.8% of the organized patients answered that there was a need for more intensive diagnostic effort during follow-up.Despite the fact that only one third of the patients responded to the questionnaire, the survey indicates that a majority of physicians who treated these patients still do not accept the present follow-up guidelines.To some extent this may be explained by the observation that patients and possibly also their doctors trust that intensified follow-up increases diagnostic security and survival.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Hematology and Oncology.

ABSTRACT

Background: International guidelines for the surveillance of breast cancer patients recommend a minimized clinical follow-up including routine history and physical examination and regularly scheduled mammograms. However, the abandonment of scheduled follow-up examinations in breast cancer survivors remains a contradiction to established follow-up guidelines for other solid tumours.

Patients and methods: We report the patients' view on the basis of a survey performed in two separate geographical areas in Germany. The questionnaires were sent out to 2.658 patients with a history of breast cancer.

Results: A total of 801 patients (30.1%) responded to the questionnaire. The results of the survey can be summarized in two major categories: First, necessity for surveillance was affirmed by a majority (>95%), and 47.8% of the organized patients answered that there was a need for more intensive diagnostic effort during follow-up. The main expectation from an intensified follow-up was the increased feeling of security as expressed by >80% of the women. Second, the present survey indicates that most of the regularly scheduled follow-up visits were expanded using extensive laboratory and imaging procedures exceeding the quantity of examinations recommended in the present follow-up guidelines.

Conclusion: Despite the fact that only one third of the patients responded to the questionnaire, the survey indicates that a majority of physicians who treated these patients still do not accept the present follow-up guidelines. To some extent this may be explained by the observation that patients and possibly also their doctors trust that intensified follow-up increases diagnostic security and survival. Since considerable changes in the treatment options of breast cancer have been made during the last decades a new trial of investigations in follow-up is warranted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Question: Necessity of surveillance?
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f1-bcbcr-1-2008-017: Question: Necessity of surveillance?

Mentions: Independent of a membership to a self-help organization a majority of the patients affirmed the need for follow-up after primary treatment of breast cancer. Necessity of surveillance was affirmed by 95.3% of the members of a self-help group which was comparable to 96.3% in non-organized patients (Fig. 1).


The reality in the surveillance of breast cancer survivors-results of a patient survey.

Hans-Joachim S, Dorit L, Petra S, Ingo B, Steffen K, Alexander FP, Wilhelm BM, Margrit G, Ursula GP, Verena H, Michael U, Volker H - Breast Cancer (Auckl) (2008)

Question: Necessity of surveillance?
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3104718&req=5

f1-bcbcr-1-2008-017: Question: Necessity of surveillance?
Mentions: Independent of a membership to a self-help organization a majority of the patients affirmed the need for follow-up after primary treatment of breast cancer. Necessity of surveillance was affirmed by 95.3% of the members of a self-help group which was comparable to 96.3% in non-organized patients (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: The results of the survey can be summarized in two major categories: First, necessity for surveillance was affirmed by a majority (>95%), and 47.8% of the organized patients answered that there was a need for more intensive diagnostic effort during follow-up.Despite the fact that only one third of the patients responded to the questionnaire, the survey indicates that a majority of physicians who treated these patients still do not accept the present follow-up guidelines.To some extent this may be explained by the observation that patients and possibly also their doctors trust that intensified follow-up increases diagnostic security and survival.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Hematology and Oncology.

ABSTRACT

Background: International guidelines for the surveillance of breast cancer patients recommend a minimized clinical follow-up including routine history and physical examination and regularly scheduled mammograms. However, the abandonment of scheduled follow-up examinations in breast cancer survivors remains a contradiction to established follow-up guidelines for other solid tumours.

Patients and methods: We report the patients' view on the basis of a survey performed in two separate geographical areas in Germany. The questionnaires were sent out to 2.658 patients with a history of breast cancer.

Results: A total of 801 patients (30.1%) responded to the questionnaire. The results of the survey can be summarized in two major categories: First, necessity for surveillance was affirmed by a majority (>95%), and 47.8% of the organized patients answered that there was a need for more intensive diagnostic effort during follow-up. The main expectation from an intensified follow-up was the increased feeling of security as expressed by >80% of the women. Second, the present survey indicates that most of the regularly scheduled follow-up visits were expanded using extensive laboratory and imaging procedures exceeding the quantity of examinations recommended in the present follow-up guidelines.

Conclusion: Despite the fact that only one third of the patients responded to the questionnaire, the survey indicates that a majority of physicians who treated these patients still do not accept the present follow-up guidelines. To some extent this may be explained by the observation that patients and possibly also their doctors trust that intensified follow-up increases diagnostic security and survival. Since considerable changes in the treatment options of breast cancer have been made during the last decades a new trial of investigations in follow-up is warranted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus