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Evaluation of work place stress in health university workers: a study from rural India.

Mishra B, Mehta S, Sinha ND, Shukla SK, Ahmed N, Kawatra A - Indian J Community Med (2011)

Bottom Line: Prominent work environmental stressors were poor departmental reorganization, lack of cohesiveness in department, difficult superiors and juniors (P ≤ 0.001, Pearson correlation).Stressors associated with work organization and work nature were: noninvolvement in departmental decision making and lack of proper feedback; along with; work load, lack of clarity in job, and a erratic work schedule (P ≤ 0.001 on Pearson correlation).Poor work culture was found to lead to job dissatisfaction among majority.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Community Medicine, Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences, PMT, Loni, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Healthcare providers being over-worked and under staffed are prone to poor mental health. Unhealthy work place compounds it further.

Aims: This study was aimed at to assess the mental health status of a medical university employee with special reference to work place stressors.

Settings and design: A cross-sectional study was designed and carried out at a Rural Health University.

Materials and methods: Both the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)-12 and Holmes-Rahe Scale were used to evaluate 406 participants.

Statistical analysis: Multivariate analysis, correlation, and ANOVA by SPSS 11.0.

Results: The minimum age of the participant was 19 years and the maximum 64 years, with an average age at 35.09 years. On the GHQ scale 239(58.9%) recorded psychiatric morbidity out of which 201(49.5%) had moderate and 38(9.3%) severe morbidity. Doctors were the highest stressed group (P ≤ 0.04). Prominent work environmental stressors were poor departmental reorganization, lack of cohesiveness in department, difficult superiors and juniors (P ≤ 0.001, Pearson correlation). Stressors associated with work organization and work nature were: noninvolvement in departmental decision making and lack of proper feedback; along with; work load, lack of clarity in job, and a erratic work schedule (P ≤ 0.001 on Pearson correlation). Harassment, favoritism, discrimination, and lack of self-expression (P ≤ 0.003) were other factors responsible for work dissatisfaction.

Conclusions: A high stress level was detected in the study population. The principal stressors were work environment related. Poor work culture was found to lead to job dissatisfaction among majority.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Prevalence of stressors in the study population as per GHQ 12
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Figure 1: Prevalence of stressors in the study population as per GHQ 12

Mentions: GHQ-12 evaluations: GHQ scoring pattern of 0, 1, 1, and 2 was used. The cut-off point of no morbidity was defined as scores “less than 4”. Participants with scores ≥4 were diagnosed to have moderate psychiatric morbidity and ≥8 as severe psychiatric morbidity.(5) On this scale, the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity was recorded at 58.9%, i.e. 239 out of 406. From this 201 (49.5%) registered moderate and 38(9.3%) severe morbidity. Profession wise doctors recorded the highest prevalence of psychiatric morbidity at 106/169(62.8%) followed by skilled manpower at 84/136(61.8%) and unskilled at a low value of 49/101(48.5%). There was significant difference in psychiatric morbidity between professionals and skilled groups vs. unskilled groups (P < 0.05). Prevalence of different stressors in study population as per GHQ 12 criteria was presented in Figure 1.


Evaluation of work place stress in health university workers: a study from rural India.

Mishra B, Mehta S, Sinha ND, Shukla SK, Ahmed N, Kawatra A - Indian J Community Med (2011)

Prevalence of stressors in the study population as per GHQ 12
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3104707&req=5

Figure 1: Prevalence of stressors in the study population as per GHQ 12
Mentions: GHQ-12 evaluations: GHQ scoring pattern of 0, 1, 1, and 2 was used. The cut-off point of no morbidity was defined as scores “less than 4”. Participants with scores ≥4 were diagnosed to have moderate psychiatric morbidity and ≥8 as severe psychiatric morbidity.(5) On this scale, the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity was recorded at 58.9%, i.e. 239 out of 406. From this 201 (49.5%) registered moderate and 38(9.3%) severe morbidity. Profession wise doctors recorded the highest prevalence of psychiatric morbidity at 106/169(62.8%) followed by skilled manpower at 84/136(61.8%) and unskilled at a low value of 49/101(48.5%). There was significant difference in psychiatric morbidity between professionals and skilled groups vs. unskilled groups (P < 0.05). Prevalence of different stressors in study population as per GHQ 12 criteria was presented in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Prominent work environmental stressors were poor departmental reorganization, lack of cohesiveness in department, difficult superiors and juniors (P ≤ 0.001, Pearson correlation).Stressors associated with work organization and work nature were: noninvolvement in departmental decision making and lack of proper feedback; along with; work load, lack of clarity in job, and a erratic work schedule (P ≤ 0.001 on Pearson correlation).Poor work culture was found to lead to job dissatisfaction among majority.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Community Medicine, Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences, PMT, Loni, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Healthcare providers being over-worked and under staffed are prone to poor mental health. Unhealthy work place compounds it further.

Aims: This study was aimed at to assess the mental health status of a medical university employee with special reference to work place stressors.

Settings and design: A cross-sectional study was designed and carried out at a Rural Health University.

Materials and methods: Both the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)-12 and Holmes-Rahe Scale were used to evaluate 406 participants.

Statistical analysis: Multivariate analysis, correlation, and ANOVA by SPSS 11.0.

Results: The minimum age of the participant was 19 years and the maximum 64 years, with an average age at 35.09 years. On the GHQ scale 239(58.9%) recorded psychiatric morbidity out of which 201(49.5%) had moderate and 38(9.3%) severe morbidity. Doctors were the highest stressed group (P ≤ 0.04). Prominent work environmental stressors were poor departmental reorganization, lack of cohesiveness in department, difficult superiors and juniors (P ≤ 0.001, Pearson correlation). Stressors associated with work organization and work nature were: noninvolvement in departmental decision making and lack of proper feedback; along with; work load, lack of clarity in job, and a erratic work schedule (P ≤ 0.001 on Pearson correlation). Harassment, favoritism, discrimination, and lack of self-expression (P ≤ 0.003) were other factors responsible for work dissatisfaction.

Conclusions: A high stress level was detected in the study population. The principal stressors were work environment related. Poor work culture was found to lead to job dissatisfaction among majority.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus