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Clinical features and multidisciplinary approaches to dementia care.

Grand JH, Caspar S, Macdonald SW - J Multidiscip Healthc (2011)

Bottom Line: These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers.Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1) Alzheimer's disease; 2) vascular dementias; 3) frontotemporal dementias; and 4) dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson's disease dementia.Future research goals are outlined, with a call to action for social policy initiatives that promote preventive lifestyle behaviors, and healthcare programs that will support the growing number of individuals affected by dementia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada;

ABSTRACT
Dementia is a clinical syndrome of widespread progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities and normal daily functioning. These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers. Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1) Alzheimer's disease; 2) vascular dementias; 3) frontotemporal dementias; and 4) dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson's disease dementia. The cumulative efforts of multidisciplinary healthcare teams have advanced our understanding of dementia beyond basic descriptions, towards a more complete elucidation of risk factors, clinical symptoms, and neuropathological correlates. The characterization of disease subtypes has facilitated targeted management strategies, advanced treatments, and symptomatic care for individuals affected by dementia. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge and directions of dementia research and clinical practice. We provide a description of the risk factors, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of dementia. A summary of multidisciplinary team approaches to dementia care is outlined, including management strategies for the treatment of cognitive impairments, functional deficits, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The needs of individuals with dementia are extensive, often requiring care beyond traditional bounds of medical practice, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management interventions. Finally, advanced research on the early prodromal phase of dementia is reviewed, with a focus on change-point models, trajectories of cognitive change, and threshold models of pathological burden. Future research goals are outlined, with a call to action for social policy initiatives that promote preventive lifestyle behaviors, and healthcare programs that will support the growing number of individuals affected by dementia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Worldwide subtypes of late onset dementia (≥65 years).Copyright © 2007, Elsevier Inc. Adapted with permission from Brookmeyer et al.6Abbreviations: DLB, dementia with Lewy bodies; FTD, frontotemporal dementias.
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f1-jmdh-4-125: Worldwide subtypes of late onset dementia (≥65 years).Copyright © 2007, Elsevier Inc. Adapted with permission from Brookmeyer et al.6Abbreviations: DLB, dementia with Lewy bodies; FTD, frontotemporal dementias.

Mentions: The prevalence of dementia is also rising, particularly AD, which is the most common form of dementia accounting for approximately 60% of all cases.4,5 Worldwide, the global prevalence of dementia is estimated to be 3.9% in individuals over the age of 60 years, with regional prevalence rates of 1.6% in Africa, 4.0% in China and Western Pacific Regions, 4.6% in Latin America, 5.4% in Western Europe, and 6.4% in North America.3 Greater than 25 million people in the world are currently affected by dementia syndromes, with most individuals suffering from AD and vascular dementia (VaD) (Figure 1).4–6 Approximately 5 million new cases are estimated to occur each year, and the number of individuals with dementia is expected to double every 20 years (Figure 2).2,3,6


Clinical features and multidisciplinary approaches to dementia care.

Grand JH, Caspar S, Macdonald SW - J Multidiscip Healthc (2011)

Worldwide subtypes of late onset dementia (≥65 years).Copyright © 2007, Elsevier Inc. Adapted with permission from Brookmeyer et al.6Abbreviations: DLB, dementia with Lewy bodies; FTD, frontotemporal dementias.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3104685&req=5

f1-jmdh-4-125: Worldwide subtypes of late onset dementia (≥65 years).Copyright © 2007, Elsevier Inc. Adapted with permission from Brookmeyer et al.6Abbreviations: DLB, dementia with Lewy bodies; FTD, frontotemporal dementias.
Mentions: The prevalence of dementia is also rising, particularly AD, which is the most common form of dementia accounting for approximately 60% of all cases.4,5 Worldwide, the global prevalence of dementia is estimated to be 3.9% in individuals over the age of 60 years, with regional prevalence rates of 1.6% in Africa, 4.0% in China and Western Pacific Regions, 4.6% in Latin America, 5.4% in Western Europe, and 6.4% in North America.3 Greater than 25 million people in the world are currently affected by dementia syndromes, with most individuals suffering from AD and vascular dementia (VaD) (Figure 1).4–6 Approximately 5 million new cases are estimated to occur each year, and the number of individuals with dementia is expected to double every 20 years (Figure 2).2,3,6

Bottom Line: These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers.Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1) Alzheimer's disease; 2) vascular dementias; 3) frontotemporal dementias; and 4) dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson's disease dementia.Future research goals are outlined, with a call to action for social policy initiatives that promote preventive lifestyle behaviors, and healthcare programs that will support the growing number of individuals affected by dementia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada;

ABSTRACT
Dementia is a clinical syndrome of widespread progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities and normal daily functioning. These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers. Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1) Alzheimer's disease; 2) vascular dementias; 3) frontotemporal dementias; and 4) dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson's disease dementia. The cumulative efforts of multidisciplinary healthcare teams have advanced our understanding of dementia beyond basic descriptions, towards a more complete elucidation of risk factors, clinical symptoms, and neuropathological correlates. The characterization of disease subtypes has facilitated targeted management strategies, advanced treatments, and symptomatic care for individuals affected by dementia. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge and directions of dementia research and clinical practice. We provide a description of the risk factors, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of dementia. A summary of multidisciplinary team approaches to dementia care is outlined, including management strategies for the treatment of cognitive impairments, functional deficits, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The needs of individuals with dementia are extensive, often requiring care beyond traditional bounds of medical practice, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management interventions. Finally, advanced research on the early prodromal phase of dementia is reviewed, with a focus on change-point models, trajectories of cognitive change, and threshold models of pathological burden. Future research goals are outlined, with a call to action for social policy initiatives that promote preventive lifestyle behaviors, and healthcare programs that will support the growing number of individuals affected by dementia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus