Limits...
Coordination between nitric oxide and superoxide anion radical during progressive exercise in elite soccer players.

Djordjevic D, Jakovljevic V, Cubrilo D, Zlatkovic M, Zivkovic V, Djuric D - Open Biochem J (2010)

Bottom Line: This study investigates the effects of maximal progressive treadmill exercise test on time-course of peripheral blood NO and O(2) (-) production, as well as the effect of long-term training on NO bioavailability.Significant increase (p<0.05) in NO production (estimated through nitrites (NO(2) (-))), found between stage I (5.69 ± 1.32 nmol/ml) and basal values (5.36 ± 1.25 nmol/ml), was followed by the decrease in stage II (4.21 ± 0.42 nmol/ml) and production lower than basal to the end of the test.Significant increase (p<0.05) in O(2) (-) values was found between stage I (4.18 ± 0.77 nmol/ml) and resting values (4.01 ± 0.69 nmol/ml), and at stages V (4.24 ± 0.85 nmol/ml) and 1st phase of recovery (4.39 ± 0.92 nmol/ml).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac, Republic of Serbia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Exercise increases production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) via several mechanisms. Inter alia, increased blood flow during exercise exposes endothelial cells to shear stress, resulting in increased nitric oxide (NO) production. Increased oxygen consumption or hypoxia during exercise induces increased production of superoxide anion radical (O(2) (-)).

Objective: This study investigates the effects of maximal progressive treadmill exercise test on time-course of peripheral blood NO and O(2) (-) production, as well as the effect of long-term training on NO bioavailability.

Methods: Blood samples of 19 elite soccer players were gathered immediately before the test, during last 10 sec of every test stage, and during active recovery phases.

Results: Significant increase (p<0.05) in NO production (estimated through nitrites (NO(2) (-))), found between stage I (5.69 ± 1.32 nmol/ml) and basal values (5.36 ± 1.25 nmol/ml), was followed by the decrease in stage II (4.21 ± 0.42 nmol/ml) and production lower than basal to the end of the test. Significant increase (p<0.05) in O(2) (-) values was found between stage I (4.18 ± 0.77 nmol/ml) and resting values (4.01 ± 0.69 nmol/ml), and at stages V (4.24 ± 0.85 nmol/ml) and 1st phase of recovery (4.39 ± 0.92 nmol/ml).

Conclusion: The regression lines of NO(2) (-) and O(2) (-) crossed at the level of anaerobic threshold, suggesting that anaerobic threshold could be of a crucial importance not only in the anaerobic and aerobic metabolism but in mechanisms of signal transductions as well. Long-term exercise increases NO bioavailability, and there is positive correlation between NO bioavailability and maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Time-course of NO2- production during the exercise test - dependance on its basal values.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3104555&req=5

Figure 2: Time-course of NO2- production during the exercise test - dependance on its basal values.

Mentions: As basal NO2- values of athletes varied to the great extent, we divided them into three groups (depending on their basal NO2- value - B1: NO2- > 20 nmol/ml, B2: NO2- 10-20 nmol/ml, B3: NO2- < 10 nmol/ml), in order to detect differencies in time-course of NO2- production between groups, i.e. to see whether basal value of NO2- affects time-course of NO2- production during the test. Analysing the results of these three groups (The two-way ANOVA), we concluded that there were differences in NO2- production between groups (B1-B3 and B2-B3), but that the differencies were not related to the level of effort. The groups producted higher or lower concentrations of NO2-, but the pattern of NO2- production during the test was similar (Fig. 2). All three groups showed initial increase in NO2- production, and the increase was the lowest in the group with the lowest basal NO2- production. After the first level of effort, NO2- production dropped in all three groups, and stayed decreased and relatively stable to the end of the test. The group with the lowest basal NO2- production showed the least oscilations in NO2- production during the test. That is in accordance with the results of the study that compared time-course of NO2- production between athletes from different sports [48]. That study showed statistically significant variations in NO2- production between athletes of different sport, both in basal and active conditions, and also that athletes with the lowest basal NO2- production had the least oscilations in NO2- production during the test.


Coordination between nitric oxide and superoxide anion radical during progressive exercise in elite soccer players.

Djordjevic D, Jakovljevic V, Cubrilo D, Zlatkovic M, Zivkovic V, Djuric D - Open Biochem J (2010)

Time-course of NO2- production during the exercise test - dependance on its basal values.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3104555&req=5

Figure 2: Time-course of NO2- production during the exercise test - dependance on its basal values.
Mentions: As basal NO2- values of athletes varied to the great extent, we divided them into three groups (depending on their basal NO2- value - B1: NO2- > 20 nmol/ml, B2: NO2- 10-20 nmol/ml, B3: NO2- < 10 nmol/ml), in order to detect differencies in time-course of NO2- production between groups, i.e. to see whether basal value of NO2- affects time-course of NO2- production during the test. Analysing the results of these three groups (The two-way ANOVA), we concluded that there were differences in NO2- production between groups (B1-B3 and B2-B3), but that the differencies were not related to the level of effort. The groups producted higher or lower concentrations of NO2-, but the pattern of NO2- production during the test was similar (Fig. 2). All three groups showed initial increase in NO2- production, and the increase was the lowest in the group with the lowest basal NO2- production. After the first level of effort, NO2- production dropped in all three groups, and stayed decreased and relatively stable to the end of the test. The group with the lowest basal NO2- production showed the least oscilations in NO2- production during the test. That is in accordance with the results of the study that compared time-course of NO2- production between athletes from different sports [48]. That study showed statistically significant variations in NO2- production between athletes of different sport, both in basal and active conditions, and also that athletes with the lowest basal NO2- production had the least oscilations in NO2- production during the test.

Bottom Line: This study investigates the effects of maximal progressive treadmill exercise test on time-course of peripheral blood NO and O(2) (-) production, as well as the effect of long-term training on NO bioavailability.Significant increase (p<0.05) in NO production (estimated through nitrites (NO(2) (-))), found between stage I (5.69 ± 1.32 nmol/ml) and basal values (5.36 ± 1.25 nmol/ml), was followed by the decrease in stage II (4.21 ± 0.42 nmol/ml) and production lower than basal to the end of the test.Significant increase (p<0.05) in O(2) (-) values was found between stage I (4.18 ± 0.77 nmol/ml) and resting values (4.01 ± 0.69 nmol/ml), and at stages V (4.24 ± 0.85 nmol/ml) and 1st phase of recovery (4.39 ± 0.92 nmol/ml).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac, Republic of Serbia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Exercise increases production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) via several mechanisms. Inter alia, increased blood flow during exercise exposes endothelial cells to shear stress, resulting in increased nitric oxide (NO) production. Increased oxygen consumption or hypoxia during exercise induces increased production of superoxide anion radical (O(2) (-)).

Objective: This study investigates the effects of maximal progressive treadmill exercise test on time-course of peripheral blood NO and O(2) (-) production, as well as the effect of long-term training on NO bioavailability.

Methods: Blood samples of 19 elite soccer players were gathered immediately before the test, during last 10 sec of every test stage, and during active recovery phases.

Results: Significant increase (p<0.05) in NO production (estimated through nitrites (NO(2) (-))), found between stage I (5.69 ± 1.32 nmol/ml) and basal values (5.36 ± 1.25 nmol/ml), was followed by the decrease in stage II (4.21 ± 0.42 nmol/ml) and production lower than basal to the end of the test. Significant increase (p<0.05) in O(2) (-) values was found between stage I (4.18 ± 0.77 nmol/ml) and resting values (4.01 ± 0.69 nmol/ml), and at stages V (4.24 ± 0.85 nmol/ml) and 1st phase of recovery (4.39 ± 0.92 nmol/ml).

Conclusion: The regression lines of NO(2) (-) and O(2) (-) crossed at the level of anaerobic threshold, suggesting that anaerobic threshold could be of a crucial importance not only in the anaerobic and aerobic metabolism but in mechanisms of signal transductions as well. Long-term exercise increases NO bioavailability, and there is positive correlation between NO bioavailability and maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus