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Comparison of contrast and noncontrast magnetic resonance angiography for quantitative analysis of thoracic arteries in young patients with congenital heart defects.

Pasqua AD, Barcudi S, Leonardi B, Clemente D, Colajacomo M, Sanders SP - Ann Pediatr Cardiol (2011)

Bottom Line: Vessel diameters were compared using correlation and Bland-Altman analysis.The worse agreement and greater variability of the pulmonary artery measures appears due to difficulty standardizing the measurements in patients with abnormal and irregular vessels.These data indicate that C-MRA and NC-MRA measures are comparable and could be used interchangeably, avoiding administration of contrast in selected patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Surgical Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù, Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Background: Contrast MRA (C-MRA) is the standard for quantitative analysis of thoracic vessels. We evaluated a noncontrast MRA (NC-MRA) sequence (3-D EKG and navigator-gated SSFP) for quantitative evaluation of the thoracic aorta and branch pulmonary arteries in young patients with congenital heart disease.

Objective: To compare contrast and noncontrast magnetic resonance angiography for quantitative analysis of thoracic arteries in young patients with congenital heart defects.

Methods: Measurements of thoracic aorta and branch pulmonary arteries were obtained from C-MRA and NC-MRA images in 51 patients, ages 2-35 years. Vessel diameters were compared using correlation and Bland-Altman analysis. Interobserver variability was assessed using percent variation.

Results: C-MRA and NC-MRA measurements were highly correlated (r = 0.91-0.98) except for the right pulmonary artery (r = 0.74, 0.78). Agreement of measurements was excellent (mean difference -0.07 to -0.53 mm; mean % difference -1.8 to -4.9%) except for the right pulmonary artery which was less good (mean difference 0.73, -1.38 mm; -3, -10%). Interobserver variability ranged from 5% to 8% for aortic and from 10% to 16% for pulmonary artery measures. The worse agreement and greater variability of the pulmonary artery measures appears due to difficulty standardizing the measurements in patients with abnormal and irregular vessels.

Conclusion: These data indicate that C-MRA and NC-MRA measures are comparable and could be used interchangeably, avoiding administration of contrast in selected patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Bland Altman plots for the two ascending aorta dimensions as an example of the level of agreement between C-MRA and NC-MRA measurements
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Figure 1: Bland Altman plots for the two ascending aorta dimensions as an example of the level of agreement between C-MRA and NC-MRA measurements

Mentions: All measures from C-MRA and NC-MRA images were highly correlated (r > 0.9) except for right pulmonary artery dimensions [Table 1]. The mean differences between measures ranged from –0.07 to –1.38 mm or –1.8% to –10% [Table 2]. Bland Altman analysis showed a small but consistent bias toward larger dimensions from the C-MRA images, as indicated by the negative differences [Figure 1].


Comparison of contrast and noncontrast magnetic resonance angiography for quantitative analysis of thoracic arteries in young patients with congenital heart defects.

Pasqua AD, Barcudi S, Leonardi B, Clemente D, Colajacomo M, Sanders SP - Ann Pediatr Cardiol (2011)

Bland Altman plots for the two ascending aorta dimensions as an example of the level of agreement between C-MRA and NC-MRA measurements
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3104530&req=5

Figure 1: Bland Altman plots for the two ascending aorta dimensions as an example of the level of agreement between C-MRA and NC-MRA measurements
Mentions: All measures from C-MRA and NC-MRA images were highly correlated (r > 0.9) except for right pulmonary artery dimensions [Table 1]. The mean differences between measures ranged from –0.07 to –1.38 mm or –1.8% to –10% [Table 2]. Bland Altman analysis showed a small but consistent bias toward larger dimensions from the C-MRA images, as indicated by the negative differences [Figure 1].

Bottom Line: Vessel diameters were compared using correlation and Bland-Altman analysis.The worse agreement and greater variability of the pulmonary artery measures appears due to difficulty standardizing the measurements in patients with abnormal and irregular vessels.These data indicate that C-MRA and NC-MRA measures are comparable and could be used interchangeably, avoiding administration of contrast in selected patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Surgical Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù, Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Background: Contrast MRA (C-MRA) is the standard for quantitative analysis of thoracic vessels. We evaluated a noncontrast MRA (NC-MRA) sequence (3-D EKG and navigator-gated SSFP) for quantitative evaluation of the thoracic aorta and branch pulmonary arteries in young patients with congenital heart disease.

Objective: To compare contrast and noncontrast magnetic resonance angiography for quantitative analysis of thoracic arteries in young patients with congenital heart defects.

Methods: Measurements of thoracic aorta and branch pulmonary arteries were obtained from C-MRA and NC-MRA images in 51 patients, ages 2-35 years. Vessel diameters were compared using correlation and Bland-Altman analysis. Interobserver variability was assessed using percent variation.

Results: C-MRA and NC-MRA measurements were highly correlated (r = 0.91-0.98) except for the right pulmonary artery (r = 0.74, 0.78). Agreement of measurements was excellent (mean difference -0.07 to -0.53 mm; mean % difference -1.8 to -4.9%) except for the right pulmonary artery which was less good (mean difference 0.73, -1.38 mm; -3, -10%). Interobserver variability ranged from 5% to 8% for aortic and from 10% to 16% for pulmonary artery measures. The worse agreement and greater variability of the pulmonary artery measures appears due to difficulty standardizing the measurements in patients with abnormal and irregular vessels.

Conclusion: These data indicate that C-MRA and NC-MRA measures are comparable and could be used interchangeably, avoiding administration of contrast in selected patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus