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Monitoring the United Nation's Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: data and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health.

Bickenbach JE - BMC Public Health (2011)

Bottom Line: This paper approaches the general issue of the complex challenges in the relationship between those who generate data--researchers, scientists, and state statistical offices--and those who use data--researchers and policy-makers--in light of the more specific policy challenges created by the monitoring requirement of the United Nation's Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD: Article 33).The CRPD, by contrast, explicitly requires State Parties who have ratified it to institute data generation and monitoring mechanisms for its implementation.This paper argues that WHO's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) can be brought into the service of the CRPD data generation and monitoring mandate, both in the shaping of relevant data streams and in the creation of relevant indicators, and concludes by reviewing the challenges that remain.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Sciences and Health Policy, University of Lucerne, Switzerland. jerome.bickenbach@paranet.ch

ABSTRACT
This paper approaches the general issue of the complex challenges in the relationship between those who generate data--researchers, scientists, and state statistical offices--and those who use data--researchers and policy-makers--in light of the more specific policy challenges created by the monitoring requirement of the United Nation's Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD: Article 33). International Conventions and Treaties standardly suffer from being persistently ineffectual primarily because of the absence of implementation mechanisms. The CRPD, by contrast, explicitly requires State Parties who have ratified it to institute data generation and monitoring mechanisms for its implementation. This paper argues that WHO's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) can be brought into the service of the CRPD data generation and monitoring mandate, both in the shaping of relevant data streams and in the creation of relevant indicators, and concludes by reviewing the challenges that remain.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

WHO 2001
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 1: WHO 2001

Mentions: ICF provides both a model of functioning and disability and a set of classifications for describing these phenomena in detail. ICF understands these phenomena as outcomes of an interaction between an underlying health condition (disease, disorder or injury) and the full range of environmental factors (physical, human-built, social and attitudinal) and personal factors. Figure 1 is a diagram of this familiar model.


Monitoring the United Nation's Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: data and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health.

Bickenbach JE - BMC Public Health (2011)

WHO 2001
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3104221&req=5

Figure 1: WHO 2001
Mentions: ICF provides both a model of functioning and disability and a set of classifications for describing these phenomena in detail. ICF understands these phenomena as outcomes of an interaction between an underlying health condition (disease, disorder or injury) and the full range of environmental factors (physical, human-built, social and attitudinal) and personal factors. Figure 1 is a diagram of this familiar model.

Bottom Line: This paper approaches the general issue of the complex challenges in the relationship between those who generate data--researchers, scientists, and state statistical offices--and those who use data--researchers and policy-makers--in light of the more specific policy challenges created by the monitoring requirement of the United Nation's Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD: Article 33).The CRPD, by contrast, explicitly requires State Parties who have ratified it to institute data generation and monitoring mechanisms for its implementation.This paper argues that WHO's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) can be brought into the service of the CRPD data generation and monitoring mandate, both in the shaping of relevant data streams and in the creation of relevant indicators, and concludes by reviewing the challenges that remain.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Sciences and Health Policy, University of Lucerne, Switzerland. jerome.bickenbach@paranet.ch

ABSTRACT
This paper approaches the general issue of the complex challenges in the relationship between those who generate data--researchers, scientists, and state statistical offices--and those who use data--researchers and policy-makers--in light of the more specific policy challenges created by the monitoring requirement of the United Nation's Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD: Article 33). International Conventions and Treaties standardly suffer from being persistently ineffectual primarily because of the absence of implementation mechanisms. The CRPD, by contrast, explicitly requires State Parties who have ratified it to institute data generation and monitoring mechanisms for its implementation. This paper argues that WHO's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) can be brought into the service of the CRPD data generation and monitoring mandate, both in the shaping of relevant data streams and in the creation of relevant indicators, and concludes by reviewing the challenges that remain.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus