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Development of an ICF-based eligibility procedure for education in Switzerland.

Hollenweger J - BMC Public Health (2011)

Bottom Line: This paper provides a brief overview of the different eligibility-related practices with a special focus on children with disabilities.The paper then outlines the philosophical and conceptual framework of the eligibility procedure based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, and the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability.The different components and methodology applied to organise information in the process towards establishing eligibility are also presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Pädagogische Hochschule Zürich, Departement Forschung und Entwicklung Waltersbachstrasse 5, CH-8090, Zürich, Switzerland. judith.hollenweger@phzh.ch

ABSTRACT
Starting in January 2011, Switzerland will implement a multidimensional, context-sensitive procedure to establish eligibility in education systems. This paper provides a brief overview of the different eligibility-related practices with a special focus on children with disabilities. The paper then outlines the philosophical and conceptual framework of the eligibility procedure based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, and the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability. The different components and methodology applied to organise information in the process towards establishing eligibility are also presented. Finally, some observations are made regarding transparent and just applications of the eligibility procedure, and the implementation of this new eligibility procedure.

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Expanded ICF model
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Figure 1: Expanded ICF model

Mentions: Ultimately the policy context, financial resources and available services define which eligibility criteria are applied and how they are applied [36,9]. It is therefore unlikely that a standardised disability definition will lead to an equitable service provision independent of contextual influences as claimed by Tepper et al. [37]. An individual has to fulfil two conditions to gain eligibility: he or she has to be perceived as being “in need” of receiving the service or product in question and also “able to benefit” from it. It is not surprising therefore that policies for eligibility and service provision may vary dramatically [38]. Mehlman and Neuhauser suggest that “the best definition of disability may be the one that is the best predictor of something important” [39]. To predict the specific requirements of a child with disabilities in a given educational context, all relevant contextual variables should be considered. Different sources of information, such as the views of teachers and parents, need to be taken into account [40]. An important predictor of how much effort will be spent on the education of a child is the assumption of what that child may achieve: present participation is projected into the future and compared with the vision of capabilities, competences and abilities of a responsible, happy and healthy citizen. A definition of disability used for eligibility purposes in education systems should therefore take account of such views as they will influence efforts to help the child fulfil behavioural and curricular expectations. They will be reflected in the adaptations made to the environment and the time spent instructing the child. Therefore, the ICF model needs to be expanded to capture such envisaged aims (Figure 1).


Development of an ICF-based eligibility procedure for education in Switzerland.

Hollenweger J - BMC Public Health (2011)

Expanded ICF model
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3104220&req=5

Figure 1: Expanded ICF model
Mentions: Ultimately the policy context, financial resources and available services define which eligibility criteria are applied and how they are applied [36,9]. It is therefore unlikely that a standardised disability definition will lead to an equitable service provision independent of contextual influences as claimed by Tepper et al. [37]. An individual has to fulfil two conditions to gain eligibility: he or she has to be perceived as being “in need” of receiving the service or product in question and also “able to benefit” from it. It is not surprising therefore that policies for eligibility and service provision may vary dramatically [38]. Mehlman and Neuhauser suggest that “the best definition of disability may be the one that is the best predictor of something important” [39]. To predict the specific requirements of a child with disabilities in a given educational context, all relevant contextual variables should be considered. Different sources of information, such as the views of teachers and parents, need to be taken into account [40]. An important predictor of how much effort will be spent on the education of a child is the assumption of what that child may achieve: present participation is projected into the future and compared with the vision of capabilities, competences and abilities of a responsible, happy and healthy citizen. A definition of disability used for eligibility purposes in education systems should therefore take account of such views as they will influence efforts to help the child fulfil behavioural and curricular expectations. They will be reflected in the adaptations made to the environment and the time spent instructing the child. Therefore, the ICF model needs to be expanded to capture such envisaged aims (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: This paper provides a brief overview of the different eligibility-related practices with a special focus on children with disabilities.The paper then outlines the philosophical and conceptual framework of the eligibility procedure based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, and the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability.The different components and methodology applied to organise information in the process towards establishing eligibility are also presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Pädagogische Hochschule Zürich, Departement Forschung und Entwicklung Waltersbachstrasse 5, CH-8090, Zürich, Switzerland. judith.hollenweger@phzh.ch

ABSTRACT
Starting in January 2011, Switzerland will implement a multidimensional, context-sensitive procedure to establish eligibility in education systems. This paper provides a brief overview of the different eligibility-related practices with a special focus on children with disabilities. The paper then outlines the philosophical and conceptual framework of the eligibility procedure based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, and the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability. The different components and methodology applied to organise information in the process towards establishing eligibility are also presented. Finally, some observations are made regarding transparent and just applications of the eligibility procedure, and the implementation of this new eligibility procedure.

Show MeSH