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Real time observation of mouse fetal skeleton using a high resolution X-ray synchrotron.

Chang DW, Kim B, Shin JH, Yun YM, Je JH, Hwu YK, Yoon JH, Seong JK - J. Vet. Sci. (2011)

Bottom Line: At the same time, conventional radiography and mammography were used to compare with X-ray synchrotron.Synchrotron radiation systems facilitate real time observations of the fetal skeleton with greater accuracy and magnification compared to mammography and conventional radiography.Our results show that X-ray synchrotron systems can be used to observe the fine structures of internal organs at high magnification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763, Korea.

ABSTRACT
The X-ray synchrotron is quite different from conventional radiation sources. This technique may expand the capabilities of conventional radiology and be applied in novel manners for special cases. To evaluate the usefulness of X-ray synchrotron radiation systems for real time observations, mouse fetal skeleton development was monitored with a high resolution X-ray synchrotron. A non-monochromatized X-ray synchrotron (white beam, 5C1 beamline) was employed to observe the skeleton of mice under anesthesia at embryonic day (E)12, E14, E15, and E18. At the same time, conventional radiography and mammography were used to compare with X-ray synchrotron. After synchrotron radiation, each mouse was sacrificed and stained with Alizarin red S and Alcian blue to observe bony structures. Synchrotron radiation enabled us to view the mouse fetal skeleton beginning at gestation. Synchrotron radiation systems facilitate real time observations of the fetal skeleton with greater accuracy and magnification compared to mammography and conventional radiography. Our results show that X-ray synchrotron systems can be used to observe the fine structures of internal organs at high magnification.

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Photographs of a fetus stained with Alizarin red S and Alcian blue (A) and images of fetal ribs obtained with synchrotron radiation (B), mammography (C), and conventional radiography (D) in a pregnant mouse at E14. Although the ribs had not yet calcified (arrow), they were visualized with synchrotron radiation (arrowhead). However, the ribs were not observed with the mammography equipment or conventional radiography.
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Figure 4: Photographs of a fetus stained with Alizarin red S and Alcian blue (A) and images of fetal ribs obtained with synchrotron radiation (B), mammography (C), and conventional radiography (D) in a pregnant mouse at E14. Although the ribs had not yet calcified (arrow), they were visualized with synchrotron radiation (arrowhead). However, the ribs were not observed with the mammography equipment or conventional radiography.

Mentions: Data use to identify fetal bony structures using synchrotron radiation, conventional radiography, and mammography equipment are shown in Table 2. In conventional radiography, fetal bony structures were first visualized in one mouse at E18. This method enabled visualization of the uterus containing several fetuses and radiodense fetal bony structures; however, it was difficult to specifically identify fetal anatomic structures because of low resolution (Fig. 5D). Fetal bony structures were first visualized with mammography equipment in one mouse at E15 and two mice at E18. As shown in Fig. 5C, fetal bony structures were better defined at E18 and the skull, ribs, vertebrae, and extremities were identified. However, images of fetal bony structures from the mammography equipment were less resolved compared to those produced by synchrotron radiation (Figs. 4B and 5B).


Real time observation of mouse fetal skeleton using a high resolution X-ray synchrotron.

Chang DW, Kim B, Shin JH, Yun YM, Je JH, Hwu YK, Yoon JH, Seong JK - J. Vet. Sci. (2011)

Photographs of a fetus stained with Alizarin red S and Alcian blue (A) and images of fetal ribs obtained with synchrotron radiation (B), mammography (C), and conventional radiography (D) in a pregnant mouse at E14. Although the ribs had not yet calcified (arrow), they were visualized with synchrotron radiation (arrowhead). However, the ribs were not observed with the mammography equipment or conventional radiography.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3104163&req=5

Figure 4: Photographs of a fetus stained with Alizarin red S and Alcian blue (A) and images of fetal ribs obtained with synchrotron radiation (B), mammography (C), and conventional radiography (D) in a pregnant mouse at E14. Although the ribs had not yet calcified (arrow), they were visualized with synchrotron radiation (arrowhead). However, the ribs were not observed with the mammography equipment or conventional radiography.
Mentions: Data use to identify fetal bony structures using synchrotron radiation, conventional radiography, and mammography equipment are shown in Table 2. In conventional radiography, fetal bony structures were first visualized in one mouse at E18. This method enabled visualization of the uterus containing several fetuses and radiodense fetal bony structures; however, it was difficult to specifically identify fetal anatomic structures because of low resolution (Fig. 5D). Fetal bony structures were first visualized with mammography equipment in one mouse at E15 and two mice at E18. As shown in Fig. 5C, fetal bony structures were better defined at E18 and the skull, ribs, vertebrae, and extremities were identified. However, images of fetal bony structures from the mammography equipment were less resolved compared to those produced by synchrotron radiation (Figs. 4B and 5B).

Bottom Line: At the same time, conventional radiography and mammography were used to compare with X-ray synchrotron.Synchrotron radiation systems facilitate real time observations of the fetal skeleton with greater accuracy and magnification compared to mammography and conventional radiography.Our results show that X-ray synchrotron systems can be used to observe the fine structures of internal organs at high magnification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763, Korea.

ABSTRACT
The X-ray synchrotron is quite different from conventional radiation sources. This technique may expand the capabilities of conventional radiology and be applied in novel manners for special cases. To evaluate the usefulness of X-ray synchrotron radiation systems for real time observations, mouse fetal skeleton development was monitored with a high resolution X-ray synchrotron. A non-monochromatized X-ray synchrotron (white beam, 5C1 beamline) was employed to observe the skeleton of mice under anesthesia at embryonic day (E)12, E14, E15, and E18. At the same time, conventional radiography and mammography were used to compare with X-ray synchrotron. After synchrotron radiation, each mouse was sacrificed and stained with Alizarin red S and Alcian blue to observe bony structures. Synchrotron radiation enabled us to view the mouse fetal skeleton beginning at gestation. Synchrotron radiation systems facilitate real time observations of the fetal skeleton with greater accuracy and magnification compared to mammography and conventional radiography. Our results show that X-ray synchrotron systems can be used to observe the fine structures of internal organs at high magnification.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus