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A new approach to monitoring dengue activity.

Madoff LC, Fisman DN, Kass-Hout T - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2011)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Infectious Disease and Immunology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA.

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serology can confirm not only individual cases but identify the viral serotypes found in a given area at a point in time... systems: robust formal public health surveillance is expensive, requiring major The hierarchical nature of formal public health surveillance also poses challenges to search engines have proven to be powerful tools for influenza surveillance, ... difficult to know whether or not the terms included in the model would be vulnerable to such effects... The authors note that the expanding range of a clinically similar illness (Chikungunya) may confound the utility as well... public health resources to control dengue, and to perform traditional surveillance, influenza surveillance may include laboratory-based virological surveillance, transparency of such systems may also help demonstrate the value of openness in disease reporting, which may have “spillover effects” on traditional surveilance systems.

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Screenshot of search performed on the term “influenza” using                        the Google Insights for Search tool (http://www.google.com/insights/search/#).Although influenza searches would expect to display similar wintertime                        seasonality to pneumonia searches, depicted in Figure 1, the public concern and interest                        generated by the 2009 influenza pandemic generated a large spike in searches                        in that year, which obscures seasonal oscillation in other years.
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pntd-0001215-g002: Screenshot of search performed on the term “influenza” using the Google Insights for Search tool (http://www.google.com/insights/search/#).Although influenza searches would expect to display similar wintertime seasonality to pneumonia searches, depicted in Figure 1, the public concern and interest generated by the 2009 influenza pandemic generated a large spike in searches in that year, which obscures seasonal oscillation in other years.

Mentions: Readers unfamiliar with these approaches may wish to try a simple experiment using the Google Insights for Search tool, which provides a graphical depiction of both search term volumes and online media reports of disease (http://www.google.com/insights/search/#). Searches on terms such as “norovirus” or “pneumonia” produce seasonally oscillating patterns of searches as one might anticipate in diseases with strong wintertime seasonality (Figure 1), and which is presumably generated by individuals who have, or know someone who has, this diagnosis seeking to learn more about it online. However, the pitfalls of this approach can be appreciated in a similar manner: a search on the term “influenza” produces a graph with a tremendous spike in 2009 (Figure 2); indeed a spike so large that it obscures influenza activity in all other years. This reflects the difficulties that searchstream-based surveillance methods may encounter when evaluating diseases that generate extreme public concern or media attention.


A new approach to monitoring dengue activity.

Madoff LC, Fisman DN, Kass-Hout T - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2011)

Screenshot of search performed on the term “influenza” using                        the Google Insights for Search tool (http://www.google.com/insights/search/#).Although influenza searches would expect to display similar wintertime                        seasonality to pneumonia searches, depicted in Figure 1, the public concern and interest                        generated by the 2009 influenza pandemic generated a large spike in searches                        in that year, which obscures seasonal oscillation in other years.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3104030&req=5

pntd-0001215-g002: Screenshot of search performed on the term “influenza” using the Google Insights for Search tool (http://www.google.com/insights/search/#).Although influenza searches would expect to display similar wintertime seasonality to pneumonia searches, depicted in Figure 1, the public concern and interest generated by the 2009 influenza pandemic generated a large spike in searches in that year, which obscures seasonal oscillation in other years.
Mentions: Readers unfamiliar with these approaches may wish to try a simple experiment using the Google Insights for Search tool, which provides a graphical depiction of both search term volumes and online media reports of disease (http://www.google.com/insights/search/#). Searches on terms such as “norovirus” or “pneumonia” produce seasonally oscillating patterns of searches as one might anticipate in diseases with strong wintertime seasonality (Figure 1), and which is presumably generated by individuals who have, or know someone who has, this diagnosis seeking to learn more about it online. However, the pitfalls of this approach can be appreciated in a similar manner: a search on the term “influenza” produces a graph with a tremendous spike in 2009 (Figure 2); indeed a spike so large that it obscures influenza activity in all other years. This reflects the difficulties that searchstream-based surveillance methods may encounter when evaluating diseases that generate extreme public concern or media attention.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Infectious Disease and Immunology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

serology can confirm not only individual cases but identify the viral serotypes found in a given area at a point in time... systems: robust formal public health surveillance is expensive, requiring major The hierarchical nature of formal public health surveillance also poses challenges to search engines have proven to be powerful tools for influenza surveillance, ... difficult to know whether or not the terms included in the model would be vulnerable to such effects... The authors note that the expanding range of a clinically similar illness (Chikungunya) may confound the utility as well... public health resources to control dengue, and to perform traditional surveillance, influenza surveillance may include laboratory-based virological surveillance, transparency of such systems may also help demonstrate the value of openness in disease reporting, which may have “spillover effects” on traditional surveilance systems.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus