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Parent-completed developmental screening in premature children: a valid tool for follow-up programs.

Flamant C, Branger B, Nguyen The Tich S, de la Rochebrochard E, Savagner C, Berlie I, Rozé JC - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: The median value for ASQ was not significantly associated with socio-economic level or maternal education.ASQ is an easy and reliable tool regardless of the socio-economic status of the family to predict normal neurologic outcome in ex-premature infants at 2 years of age.ASQ may be beneficial with a low-cost impact to some follow-up programs, and helps to establish a genuine sense of parental involvement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neonatal Medicine, University Hospital, Nantes, France. cyril.flamant@chu-nantes.fr

ABSTRACT
Our goals were to (1) validate the parental Ages and Stages Questionnaires (ASQ) as a screening tool for psychomotor development among a cohort of ex-premature infants reaching 2 years, and (2) analyse the influence of parental socio-economic status and maternal education on the efficacy of the questionnaire. A regional population of 703 very preterm infants (<35 weeks gestational age) born between 2003 and 2006 were evaluated at 2 years by their parents who completed the ASQ, by a pediatric clinical examination, and by the revised Brunet Lezine psychometric test with establishment of a DQ score. Detailed information regarding parental socio-economic status was available for 419 infants. At 2 years corrected age, 630 infants (89.6%) had an optimal neuromotor examination. Overall ASQ scores for predicting a DQ score ≤85 produced an area under the receiver operator curve value of 0.85 (95% Confidence Interval:0.82-0.87). An ASQ cut-off score of ≤220 had optimal discriminatory power for identifying a DQ score ≤85 with a sensitivity of 0.85 (95%CI:0.75-0.91), a specificity of 0.72 (95%CI:0.69-0.75), a positive likelihood ratio of 3, and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.21. The median value for ASQ was not significantly associated with socio-economic level or maternal education. ASQ is an easy and reliable tool regardless of the socio-economic status of the family to predict normal neurologic outcome in ex-premature infants at 2 years of age. ASQ may be beneficial with a low-cost impact to some follow-up programs, and helps to establish a genuine sense of parental involvement.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Cohort profile.
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pone-0020004-g001: Cohort profile.

Mentions: Eight-hundred and twenty-four infants of the 930 infants enrolled in the regional network attended a medical examination at 2 years of age (89%). As described in the cohort profile (Fig. 1), ASQ was assessed for 721 infants. Eighteen of these infants did not receive the Brunet Lezine test. At the end, 703 infants were included in the analysis. There were no significant differences between these 703 infants and the others (n = 227) with respect to gestational age (respectively 31.6 weeks GA ±2.3 vs. 31.8 weeks GA±2.3, p = 0.47) and birth weight (respectively 1662 gr ±530 vs. 1591 gr ±437, p = 0.33).


Parent-completed developmental screening in premature children: a valid tool for follow-up programs.

Flamant C, Branger B, Nguyen The Tich S, de la Rochebrochard E, Savagner C, Berlie I, Rozé JC - PLoS ONE (2011)

Cohort profile.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102669&req=5

pone-0020004-g001: Cohort profile.
Mentions: Eight-hundred and twenty-four infants of the 930 infants enrolled in the regional network attended a medical examination at 2 years of age (89%). As described in the cohort profile (Fig. 1), ASQ was assessed for 721 infants. Eighteen of these infants did not receive the Brunet Lezine test. At the end, 703 infants were included in the analysis. There were no significant differences between these 703 infants and the others (n = 227) with respect to gestational age (respectively 31.6 weeks GA ±2.3 vs. 31.8 weeks GA±2.3, p = 0.47) and birth weight (respectively 1662 gr ±530 vs. 1591 gr ±437, p = 0.33).

Bottom Line: The median value for ASQ was not significantly associated with socio-economic level or maternal education.ASQ is an easy and reliable tool regardless of the socio-economic status of the family to predict normal neurologic outcome in ex-premature infants at 2 years of age.ASQ may be beneficial with a low-cost impact to some follow-up programs, and helps to establish a genuine sense of parental involvement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neonatal Medicine, University Hospital, Nantes, France. cyril.flamant@chu-nantes.fr

ABSTRACT
Our goals were to (1) validate the parental Ages and Stages Questionnaires (ASQ) as a screening tool for psychomotor development among a cohort of ex-premature infants reaching 2 years, and (2) analyse the influence of parental socio-economic status and maternal education on the efficacy of the questionnaire. A regional population of 703 very preterm infants (<35 weeks gestational age) born between 2003 and 2006 were evaluated at 2 years by their parents who completed the ASQ, by a pediatric clinical examination, and by the revised Brunet Lezine psychometric test with establishment of a DQ score. Detailed information regarding parental socio-economic status was available for 419 infants. At 2 years corrected age, 630 infants (89.6%) had an optimal neuromotor examination. Overall ASQ scores for predicting a DQ score ≤85 produced an area under the receiver operator curve value of 0.85 (95% Confidence Interval:0.82-0.87). An ASQ cut-off score of ≤220 had optimal discriminatory power for identifying a DQ score ≤85 with a sensitivity of 0.85 (95%CI:0.75-0.91), a specificity of 0.72 (95%CI:0.69-0.75), a positive likelihood ratio of 3, and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.21. The median value for ASQ was not significantly associated with socio-economic level or maternal education. ASQ is an easy and reliable tool regardless of the socio-economic status of the family to predict normal neurologic outcome in ex-premature infants at 2 years of age. ASQ may be beneficial with a low-cost impact to some follow-up programs, and helps to establish a genuine sense of parental involvement.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus