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Altered cerebellar-cerebral functional connectivity in geriatric depression.

Alalade E, Denny K, Potter G, Steffens D, Wang L - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: The results revealed that, compared with controls, individuals with depression show reduced functional connectivity between several cerebellum seed regions, specifically those in the executive and affective-limbic networks with the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and increased functional connectivity between the motor-related cerebellum seed regions with the putamen and motor cortex.We further investigated whether the altered functional connectivity in depressed patients was associated with cognitive function and severity of depression.A positive correlation was found between the Crus II-vmPFC connectivity and performance on the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised delayed memory recall.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Although volumetric and activation changes in the cerebellum have frequently been reported in studies on major depression, its role in the neural mechanism of depression remains unclear. To understand how the cerebellum may relate to affective and cognitive dysfunction in depression, we investigated the resting-state functional connectivity between cerebellar regions and the cerebral cortex in samples of patients with geriatric depression (n = 11) and healthy controls (n = 18). Seed-based connectivity analyses were conducted using seeds from cerebellum regions previously identified as being involved in the executive, default-mode, affective-limbic, and motor networks. The results revealed that, compared with controls, individuals with depression show reduced functional connectivity between several cerebellum seed regions, specifically those in the executive and affective-limbic networks with the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and increased functional connectivity between the motor-related cerebellum seed regions with the putamen and motor cortex. We further investigated whether the altered functional connectivity in depressed patients was associated with cognitive function and severity of depression. A positive correlation was found between the Crus II-vmPFC connectivity and performance on the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised delayed memory recall. Additionally, the vermis-posterior cinglate cortex (PCC) connectivity was positively correlated with depression severity. Our results suggest that cerebellum-vmPFC coupling may be related to cognitive function whereas cerebellum-PCC coupling may be related to emotion processing in geriatric depression.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Significant correlation of decreased right Crus II Exec2-vmPFC connectivity with poorer performance on the HVLT-R delay across both depressed (purple squares) and control subjects (blue dots).Data from all participants were included in this regression analysis.
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pone-0020035-g005: Significant correlation of decreased right Crus II Exec2-vmPFC connectivity with poorer performance on the HVLT-R delay across both depressed (purple squares) and control subjects (blue dots).Data from all participants were included in this regression analysis.

Mentions: We further investigated whether any of the significant differences in the resting state functional connectivity between depressed patients and controls were correlated with scores on memory and executive function tasks or with severity of depression. Using scores for each participant on the HVLT-R delay test and the Stroop Color and Word test as regressors in separate third-level group analysis models, we found a positive correlation between the right Crus IIExec2–vmPFC connectivity and performance on the HVLT-R delay (r27 = 0.59, p = 0.001) across all subjects (Figure 5). Given that the majority of control subjects had a MADRS score of 0, the correlation between the functional connectivity with severity of depression was conducted only in the depressed group. Within the depressed group, the VermisLimbic–PCC coupling was positively correlated with severity of depression measured by the MADRS (r10 = 0.87, p = 0.004) (Figure 6).


Altered cerebellar-cerebral functional connectivity in geriatric depression.

Alalade E, Denny K, Potter G, Steffens D, Wang L - PLoS ONE (2011)

Significant correlation of decreased right Crus II Exec2-vmPFC connectivity with poorer performance on the HVLT-R delay across both depressed (purple squares) and control subjects (blue dots).Data from all participants were included in this regression analysis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102667&req=5

pone-0020035-g005: Significant correlation of decreased right Crus II Exec2-vmPFC connectivity with poorer performance on the HVLT-R delay across both depressed (purple squares) and control subjects (blue dots).Data from all participants were included in this regression analysis.
Mentions: We further investigated whether any of the significant differences in the resting state functional connectivity between depressed patients and controls were correlated with scores on memory and executive function tasks or with severity of depression. Using scores for each participant on the HVLT-R delay test and the Stroop Color and Word test as regressors in separate third-level group analysis models, we found a positive correlation between the right Crus IIExec2–vmPFC connectivity and performance on the HVLT-R delay (r27 = 0.59, p = 0.001) across all subjects (Figure 5). Given that the majority of control subjects had a MADRS score of 0, the correlation between the functional connectivity with severity of depression was conducted only in the depressed group. Within the depressed group, the VermisLimbic–PCC coupling was positively correlated with severity of depression measured by the MADRS (r10 = 0.87, p = 0.004) (Figure 6).

Bottom Line: The results revealed that, compared with controls, individuals with depression show reduced functional connectivity between several cerebellum seed regions, specifically those in the executive and affective-limbic networks with the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and increased functional connectivity between the motor-related cerebellum seed regions with the putamen and motor cortex.We further investigated whether the altered functional connectivity in depressed patients was associated with cognitive function and severity of depression.A positive correlation was found between the Crus II-vmPFC connectivity and performance on the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised delayed memory recall.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Although volumetric and activation changes in the cerebellum have frequently been reported in studies on major depression, its role in the neural mechanism of depression remains unclear. To understand how the cerebellum may relate to affective and cognitive dysfunction in depression, we investigated the resting-state functional connectivity between cerebellar regions and the cerebral cortex in samples of patients with geriatric depression (n = 11) and healthy controls (n = 18). Seed-based connectivity analyses were conducted using seeds from cerebellum regions previously identified as being involved in the executive, default-mode, affective-limbic, and motor networks. The results revealed that, compared with controls, individuals with depression show reduced functional connectivity between several cerebellum seed regions, specifically those in the executive and affective-limbic networks with the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and increased functional connectivity between the motor-related cerebellum seed regions with the putamen and motor cortex. We further investigated whether the altered functional connectivity in depressed patients was associated with cognitive function and severity of depression. A positive correlation was found between the Crus II-vmPFC connectivity and performance on the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised delayed memory recall. Additionally, the vermis-posterior cinglate cortex (PCC) connectivity was positively correlated with depression severity. Our results suggest that cerebellum-vmPFC coupling may be related to cognitive function whereas cerebellum-PCC coupling may be related to emotion processing in geriatric depression.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus