Limits...
Prevalence of footrot in Swedish slaughter lambs.

König U, Nyman AK, de Verdier K - Acta Vet. Scand. (2011)

Bottom Line: It is an infection of the epidermis of the interdigital skin, and the germinal layers of the horn tissue of the feet.However, to continue this work effectively it is important to have knowledge about the distribution of the disease both nationally and regionally.Some minor differences in geographical distribution of footrot were found in this study.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Swedish Animal Health Service, Kungsängens gård, SE-753 23 Uppsala, Sweden. ulrika.konig@svdhv.org

ABSTRACT

Background: Footrot is a world-wide contagious disease in sheep and goats. It is an infection of the epidermis of the interdigital skin, and the germinal layers of the horn tissue of the feet. The first case of footrot in Swedish sheep was diagnosed in 2004. Due to difficulties in distinguishing benign footrot from early cases of virulent footrot and because there is no possibility for virulence testing of strains of Dichelobacter nodosus in Sweden, the diagnosis is based of the presence or absence of clinical signs of footrot in sheep flocks. Ever since the first diagnosed case the Swedish Animal Health Service has worked intensively to stop the spread of infection and control the disease at flock level. However, to continue this work effectively it is important to have knowledge about the distribution of the disease both nationally and regionally. Therefore, the aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of footrot in Swedish lambs at abattoirs and to assess the geographical distribution of the disease.

Methods: A prevalence study on footrot in Swedish lambs was performed by visual examination of 2000 feet from 500 lambs submitted from six slaughter houses. Each foot was scored according to a 0 to 5 scoring system, where feet with score ≥2 were defined as having footrot. Moreover, samples from feet with footrot were examined for Dichelobacter nodosus by culture and PCR.

Results: The prevalence of footrot at the individual sheep level was 5.8%, and Dichelobacter nodosus was found by culture and PCR in 83% and 97% of the samples from feet with footrot, respectively. Some minor differences in geographical distribution of footrot were found in this study.

Conclusions: In a national context, the findings indicate that footrot is fairly common in Swedish slaughter lambs, and should be regarded seriously.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Lamb feet for visual inspection.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102620&req=5

Figure 1: Lamb feet for visual inspection.

Mentions: At the laboratory, the feet were inspected visually (figure 1) by at least one (and often by four) technicians, specially trained for the purpose. The Australian scoring system [2] was used for the assessment. Score 0 to 1 was regarded as healthy feet. Score 2-5 lesions were defined as footrot. Other foot lesions were additionally registered from the second day of the study (September 2).


Prevalence of footrot in Swedish slaughter lambs.

König U, Nyman AK, de Verdier K - Acta Vet. Scand. (2011)

Lamb feet for visual inspection.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102620&req=5

Figure 1: Lamb feet for visual inspection.
Mentions: At the laboratory, the feet were inspected visually (figure 1) by at least one (and often by four) technicians, specially trained for the purpose. The Australian scoring system [2] was used for the assessment. Score 0 to 1 was regarded as healthy feet. Score 2-5 lesions were defined as footrot. Other foot lesions were additionally registered from the second day of the study (September 2).

Bottom Line: It is an infection of the epidermis of the interdigital skin, and the germinal layers of the horn tissue of the feet.However, to continue this work effectively it is important to have knowledge about the distribution of the disease both nationally and regionally.Some minor differences in geographical distribution of footrot were found in this study.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Swedish Animal Health Service, Kungsängens gård, SE-753 23 Uppsala, Sweden. ulrika.konig@svdhv.org

ABSTRACT

Background: Footrot is a world-wide contagious disease in sheep and goats. It is an infection of the epidermis of the interdigital skin, and the germinal layers of the horn tissue of the feet. The first case of footrot in Swedish sheep was diagnosed in 2004. Due to difficulties in distinguishing benign footrot from early cases of virulent footrot and because there is no possibility for virulence testing of strains of Dichelobacter nodosus in Sweden, the diagnosis is based of the presence or absence of clinical signs of footrot in sheep flocks. Ever since the first diagnosed case the Swedish Animal Health Service has worked intensively to stop the spread of infection and control the disease at flock level. However, to continue this work effectively it is important to have knowledge about the distribution of the disease both nationally and regionally. Therefore, the aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of footrot in Swedish lambs at abattoirs and to assess the geographical distribution of the disease.

Methods: A prevalence study on footrot in Swedish lambs was performed by visual examination of 2000 feet from 500 lambs submitted from six slaughter houses. Each foot was scored according to a 0 to 5 scoring system, where feet with score ≥2 were defined as having footrot. Moreover, samples from feet with footrot were examined for Dichelobacter nodosus by culture and PCR.

Results: The prevalence of footrot at the individual sheep level was 5.8%, and Dichelobacter nodosus was found by culture and PCR in 83% and 97% of the samples from feet with footrot, respectively. Some minor differences in geographical distribution of footrot were found in this study.

Conclusions: In a national context, the findings indicate that footrot is fairly common in Swedish slaughter lambs, and should be regarded seriously.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus