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Visibility of medical informatics regarding bibliometric indices and databases.

Spreckelsen C, Deserno TM, Spitzer K - BMC Med Inform Decis Mak (2011)

Bottom Line: This study examines the effects of the new indices on the visibility of Medical Informatics.The availability of index data (index coverage) and the aggregate scores of these corpora are compared for journal-related (Journal impact factor, Eigenfactor metrics, SCImago journal rank) and author-related indices (Hirsch-index, Egghes G-index).The visibility of smaller technology-oriented disciplines like Medical Informatics is changed by the new bibliometric indices and databases possibly leading to suitably changed publication strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Medical Informatics, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany. CSpreckelsen@mi.rwth-aachen.de

ABSTRACT

Background: The quantitative study of the publication output (bibliometrics) deeply influences how scientific work is perceived (bibliometric visibility). Recently, new bibliometric indices and databases have been established, which may change the visibility of disciplines, institutions and individuals. This study examines the effects of the new indices on the visibility of Medical Informatics.

Methods: By objective criteria, three sets of journals are chosen, two representing Medical Informatics and a third addressing Internal Medicine as a benchmark. The availability of index data (index coverage) and the aggregate scores of these corpora are compared for journal-related (Journal impact factor, Eigenfactor metrics, SCImago journal rank) and author-related indices (Hirsch-index, Egghes G-index). Correlation analysis compares the dependence of author-related indices.

Results: The bibliometric visibility depended on the research focus and the citation database: Scopus covers more journals relevant for Medical Informatics than ISI/Thomson Reuters. Journals focused on Medical Informatics' methodology were negatively affected by the Eigenfactor metrics, while the visibility profited from an interdisciplinary research focus. The correlation between Hirsch-indices computed on citation databases and the Internet was strong.

Conclusions: The visibility of smaller technology-oriented disciplines like Medical Informatics is changed by the new bibliometric indices and databases possibly leading to suitably changed publication strategies. Freely accessible author-related indices enable an easy and adequate individual assessment.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Index coverage of the bibliometric databases. The diagram shows the percentage of journals included in the ISI Journal Citations Report vs. the SCImago Portal.
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Figure 2: Index coverage of the bibliometric databases. The diagram shows the percentage of journals included in the ISI Journal Citations Report vs. the SCImago Portal.

Mentions: The rate of journals covered by the two most relevant bibliometric databases (ISI/Thompson Reuters vs. Scopus citation data) differed manifestly when comparing different corpora and different bibliometric databases (Figure 2). Google Scholar was not included, because it covers web publications instead of journals.


Visibility of medical informatics regarding bibliometric indices and databases.

Spreckelsen C, Deserno TM, Spitzer K - BMC Med Inform Decis Mak (2011)

Index coverage of the bibliometric databases. The diagram shows the percentage of journals included in the ISI Journal Citations Report vs. the SCImago Portal.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102604&req=5

Figure 2: Index coverage of the bibliometric databases. The diagram shows the percentage of journals included in the ISI Journal Citations Report vs. the SCImago Portal.
Mentions: The rate of journals covered by the two most relevant bibliometric databases (ISI/Thompson Reuters vs. Scopus citation data) differed manifestly when comparing different corpora and different bibliometric databases (Figure 2). Google Scholar was not included, because it covers web publications instead of journals.

Bottom Line: This study examines the effects of the new indices on the visibility of Medical Informatics.The availability of index data (index coverage) and the aggregate scores of these corpora are compared for journal-related (Journal impact factor, Eigenfactor metrics, SCImago journal rank) and author-related indices (Hirsch-index, Egghes G-index).The visibility of smaller technology-oriented disciplines like Medical Informatics is changed by the new bibliometric indices and databases possibly leading to suitably changed publication strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Medical Informatics, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany. CSpreckelsen@mi.rwth-aachen.de

ABSTRACT

Background: The quantitative study of the publication output (bibliometrics) deeply influences how scientific work is perceived (bibliometric visibility). Recently, new bibliometric indices and databases have been established, which may change the visibility of disciplines, institutions and individuals. This study examines the effects of the new indices on the visibility of Medical Informatics.

Methods: By objective criteria, three sets of journals are chosen, two representing Medical Informatics and a third addressing Internal Medicine as a benchmark. The availability of index data (index coverage) and the aggregate scores of these corpora are compared for journal-related (Journal impact factor, Eigenfactor metrics, SCImago journal rank) and author-related indices (Hirsch-index, Egghes G-index). Correlation analysis compares the dependence of author-related indices.

Results: The bibliometric visibility depended on the research focus and the citation database: Scopus covers more journals relevant for Medical Informatics than ISI/Thomson Reuters. Journals focused on Medical Informatics' methodology were negatively affected by the Eigenfactor metrics, while the visibility profited from an interdisciplinary research focus. The correlation between Hirsch-indices computed on citation databases and the Internet was strong.

Conclusions: The visibility of smaller technology-oriented disciplines like Medical Informatics is changed by the new bibliometric indices and databases possibly leading to suitably changed publication strategies. Freely accessible author-related indices enable an easy and adequate individual assessment.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus