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Use of Videophone Technology to Address Medication Adherence Issues in Persons with HIV.

Skrajner MJ, Camp CJ, Haberman JL, Heckman TG, Kochman A, Frentiu C - HIV AIDS (Auckl) (2009)

Bottom Line: The videophone version of HC produced significant increases in self-reported rates of medication adherence and was generally well-received by interventionists and participants.Challenges to the use of videophones included the requirement that only analog landlines be used, poor quality of video and audio transmissions, and high cost for equipment.Methods to overcome these challenges are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hearthstone Alzheimer Care.

ABSTRACT
Adherence to HAART medication regimens is vital to maintaining suppression of HIV, but persons with HIV face many challenges to adhering consistently to HIV medication regimens. This is particularly true for persons who live in geographically-isolated areas or who have significant levels of cognitive compromise. A videophone-based version of Reynolds' HAART CARE (HC) telephone intervention for medication adherence was pilot-tested with 23 persons living with HIV residing in both urban and non-urban communities. The purpose of the pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptance of an adherence improvement intervention administered via videophones. Furthermore, the feasibility and acceptability of conducting HIV pill counts through videophones were assessed. The videophone version of HC produced significant increases in self-reported rates of medication adherence and was generally well-received by interventionists and participants. Pill counts conducted via videophone were also well-accepted by participants. Self-reported adherence levels were higher than videophone-based pill count adherence levels. Challenges to the use of videophones included the requirement that only analog landlines be used, poor quality of video and audio transmissions, and high cost for equipment. Methods to overcome these challenges are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Videophone used in the study.
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f1-hiv-1-023: Videophone used in the study.

Mentions: Because the formative phase of Project ASPIRE was to test the acceptability and feasibility of delivering the HC intervention via videophone, all participants received the HC intervention. Upon enrollment in the study, each participant was sent a videophone (see Figure 1) and a “pill counting tray” (see Figure 2). Participants also received easy-to-read, picture-based instructions.


Use of Videophone Technology to Address Medication Adherence Issues in Persons with HIV.

Skrajner MJ, Camp CJ, Haberman JL, Heckman TG, Kochman A, Frentiu C - HIV AIDS (Auckl) (2009)

Videophone used in the study.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102525&req=5

f1-hiv-1-023: Videophone used in the study.
Mentions: Because the formative phase of Project ASPIRE was to test the acceptability and feasibility of delivering the HC intervention via videophone, all participants received the HC intervention. Upon enrollment in the study, each participant was sent a videophone (see Figure 1) and a “pill counting tray” (see Figure 2). Participants also received easy-to-read, picture-based instructions.

Bottom Line: The videophone version of HC produced significant increases in self-reported rates of medication adherence and was generally well-received by interventionists and participants.Challenges to the use of videophones included the requirement that only analog landlines be used, poor quality of video and audio transmissions, and high cost for equipment.Methods to overcome these challenges are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hearthstone Alzheimer Care.

ABSTRACT
Adherence to HAART medication regimens is vital to maintaining suppression of HIV, but persons with HIV face many challenges to adhering consistently to HIV medication regimens. This is particularly true for persons who live in geographically-isolated areas or who have significant levels of cognitive compromise. A videophone-based version of Reynolds' HAART CARE (HC) telephone intervention for medication adherence was pilot-tested with 23 persons living with HIV residing in both urban and non-urban communities. The purpose of the pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptance of an adherence improvement intervention administered via videophones. Furthermore, the feasibility and acceptability of conducting HIV pill counts through videophones were assessed. The videophone version of HC produced significant increases in self-reported rates of medication adherence and was generally well-received by interventionists and participants. Pill counts conducted via videophone were also well-accepted by participants. Self-reported adherence levels were higher than videophone-based pill count adherence levels. Challenges to the use of videophones included the requirement that only analog landlines be used, poor quality of video and audio transmissions, and high cost for equipment. Methods to overcome these challenges are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus