Limits...
Distribution of chronotypes in a large sample of young adult Saudis.

BaHammam AS, Almistehi W, Almestehi W, Albatli A, AlShaya S - Ann Saudi Med (2011 Mar-Apr)

Bottom Line: Of 540 (71.1%) males and 219 (28.9%) females participated in this study ( age range, 18-32 years), 138 (18.2%) were "morning-types," 417 (54.9%) were "neither-types" and 204 (26.9%) were "evening-types." There was no significant gender difference in MEQr typology.In Saudis, particularly males, the frequency of morning typology was somewhat higher than that reported for individuals in similar age groups in some Western countries.Most Saudi college students had no preference for morningness or eveningness and were classified as "intermediate-types." Morningness appears to be slightly more common in Saudis, especially males, than in individuals of some Western societies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University Sleep Disorders Center, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. ashammam2@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: There are no published data on the chronotypes of young Saudi adults. This study assessed the distribution of chronotypes in college-aged Saudis.

Design and setting: Cross-sectional survey of college students.

Patients and methods: A validated abridged version of the original Horne and Ostberg morningness-eveningness questionnaire (MEQr) was used to assess the chronotype of 759 subjects.

Results: Of 540 (71.1%) males and 219 (28.9%) females participated in this study ( age range, 18-32 years), 138 (18.2%) were "morning-types," 417 (54.9%) were "neither-types" and 204 (26.9%) were "evening-types." There was no significant gender difference in MEQr typology. In Saudis, particularly males, the frequency of morning typology was somewhat higher than that reported for individuals in similar age groups in some Western countries.

Conclusion: Most Saudi college students had no preference for morningness or eveningness and were classified as "intermediate-types." Morningness appears to be slightly more common in Saudis, especially males, than in individuals of some Western societies.

Show MeSH
Frequency distribution of MEQr scores (n=759).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102480&req=5

Figure 1: Frequency distribution of MEQr scores (n=759).

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the distribution of frequency of participants as a function of MEQr typology. MEQr scores ranged from 5 to 23 (mean, 16.3 [4.6]; median, 15.6). The distribution approximates a normal curve, with a skewness of 0.005 and a kurtosis of -0.4. (Table 2) compares the typology distribution of our study participants with that of four participants of other studies that used the MEQ to investigate the status of college students of the same age group in Spain, Italy, Germany and the United States.11–14 Morning typology was more common in Saudis, particularly males, than reported in some Western countries.


Distribution of chronotypes in a large sample of young adult Saudis.

BaHammam AS, Almistehi W, Almestehi W, Albatli A, AlShaya S - Ann Saudi Med (2011 Mar-Apr)

Frequency distribution of MEQr scores (n=759).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102480&req=5

Figure 1: Frequency distribution of MEQr scores (n=759).
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the distribution of frequency of participants as a function of MEQr typology. MEQr scores ranged from 5 to 23 (mean, 16.3 [4.6]; median, 15.6). The distribution approximates a normal curve, with a skewness of 0.005 and a kurtosis of -0.4. (Table 2) compares the typology distribution of our study participants with that of four participants of other studies that used the MEQ to investigate the status of college students of the same age group in Spain, Italy, Germany and the United States.11–14 Morning typology was more common in Saudis, particularly males, than reported in some Western countries.

Bottom Line: Of 540 (71.1%) males and 219 (28.9%) females participated in this study ( age range, 18-32 years), 138 (18.2%) were "morning-types," 417 (54.9%) were "neither-types" and 204 (26.9%) were "evening-types." There was no significant gender difference in MEQr typology.In Saudis, particularly males, the frequency of morning typology was somewhat higher than that reported for individuals in similar age groups in some Western countries.Most Saudi college students had no preference for morningness or eveningness and were classified as "intermediate-types." Morningness appears to be slightly more common in Saudis, especially males, than in individuals of some Western societies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University Sleep Disorders Center, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. ashammam2@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: There are no published data on the chronotypes of young Saudi adults. This study assessed the distribution of chronotypes in college-aged Saudis.

Design and setting: Cross-sectional survey of college students.

Patients and methods: A validated abridged version of the original Horne and Ostberg morningness-eveningness questionnaire (MEQr) was used to assess the chronotype of 759 subjects.

Results: Of 540 (71.1%) males and 219 (28.9%) females participated in this study ( age range, 18-32 years), 138 (18.2%) were "morning-types," 417 (54.9%) were "neither-types" and 204 (26.9%) were "evening-types." There was no significant gender difference in MEQr typology. In Saudis, particularly males, the frequency of morning typology was somewhat higher than that reported for individuals in similar age groups in some Western countries.

Conclusion: Most Saudi college students had no preference for morningness or eveningness and were classified as "intermediate-types." Morningness appears to be slightly more common in Saudis, especially males, than in individuals of some Western societies.

Show MeSH