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Faecal bifidobacteria in Indian neonates & the effect of asymptomatic rotavirus infection during the first month of life.

Balamurugan R, Magne F, Balakrishnan D, Suau A, Ramani S, Kang G, Ramakrishna BS - Indian J. Med. Res. (2010)

Bottom Line: Neonates without and with rotavirus infection in the first week of life did not show significant differences in the median count of bifidobacteria (log 10 count 7.48 vs. 7.41) or enterobacteria (log 10 count 8.79 vs. 7.92).B. longum subsp. infantis was the sole bifidobacterial species colonizing the gut of Indian neonates.Asymptomatic rotavirus infection in the first month of life was not associated with alteration in faecal bifidobacteria or enterobacteria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastrointestinal Sciences, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India.

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: Bifidobacteria colonize the gut after the first week of life and remain an important component of the gut microbiota in infancy. This study was carried out to characterize the diversity and number of bifidobacteria colonizing the gut in Indian neonates and to investigate whether asymptomatic infection with rotavirus in the first month of life affected gut colonization by bifidobacteria.

Methods: DNA was isolated from faeces of 14 term-born neonates who were under surveillance for rotavirus infection. Bacterial and bifidobacterial diversity was evaluated by temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis (TTGE) of 16S rDNA amplified using total bacteria and bifidobacteria-specific primers. Real time PCR, targeting 16S rDNA, was used to quantitate faecal bifidobacteria and enterobacteria.

Results: TTGE of conserved bacterial 16S rDNA showed 3 dominant bands of which Escherichia coli (family Enterobacteriaceae) and Bifidobacterium (family Bifidobacteriaceae) were constant. TTGE of Bifidobacterium genus-specific DNA showed a single band in all neonates identified by sequencing as Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis. Faecal bifidobacterial counts (log 10 cfu/g faeces) ranged from 6.1 to 9.3 and enterobacterial counts from 6.3 to 9.5. Neonates without and with rotavirus infection in the first week of life did not show significant differences in the median count of bifidobacteria (log 10 count 7.48 vs. 7.41) or enterobacteria (log 10 count 8.79 vs. 7.92).

Interpretation and conclusions: B. longum subsp. infantis was the sole bifidobacterial species colonizing the gut of Indian neonates. Asymptomatic rotavirus infection in the first month of life was not associated with alteration in faecal bifidobacteria or enterobacteria.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

TTGE gel showing bands obtained by electrophoresis of PCR products from neonate faeces using primers targeted at conserved bacterial 16S rDNA sequences representative of domain bacteria. Lanes at right and left extreme are with marker DNA. Bands 63 (Escherichia) and 97 (Bifidobacterium) are marked. Lanes 1 & 23 are marker DNA; lanes 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 15, 18, 21, 22 are samples from rotavirus - negative stool, while other lanes are from rotavirus-positive stool.
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Figure 0001: TTGE gel showing bands obtained by electrophoresis of PCR products from neonate faeces using primers targeted at conserved bacterial 16S rDNA sequences representative of domain bacteria. Lanes at right and left extreme are with marker DNA. Bands 63 (Escherichia) and 97 (Bifidobacterium) are marked. Lanes 1 & 23 are marker DNA; lanes 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 15, 18, 21, 22 are samples from rotavirus - negative stool, while other lanes are from rotavirus-positive stool.

Mentions: The gels resulting from PCR amplification of conserved bacteria domain sequences followed by TTGE (evaluation of total bacterial diversity) were examined for bands at 100 possible positions. Two bands, corresponding to E. coli (band 63) and Bifidobacterium genus (band 97), were almost constant being found in 14 and 12 neonates respectively. Other bands were less dominant (band 90 in 9 neonates, band 27 in 5 neonates, band 44 in 2 neonates, and bands 32, 33, 35, 37, 46, 73 in one neonate each) (Fig. 1). The median number of bacterial bands in individual neonates in the control group was 3 (IQR 3-4) which was not statistically significantly different from the median of 3 (IQR 2-4) in the Rota+ group. Among the Rota group, the number of bands after clearance of rotavirus infection (Rota-, median 4, IQR 3-8) was not different from the number during rotavirus infection (Rota+).


Faecal bifidobacteria in Indian neonates & the effect of asymptomatic rotavirus infection during the first month of life.

Balamurugan R, Magne F, Balakrishnan D, Suau A, Ramani S, Kang G, Ramakrishna BS - Indian J. Med. Res. (2010)

TTGE gel showing bands obtained by electrophoresis of PCR products from neonate faeces using primers targeted at conserved bacterial 16S rDNA sequences representative of domain bacteria. Lanes at right and left extreme are with marker DNA. Bands 63 (Escherichia) and 97 (Bifidobacterium) are marked. Lanes 1 & 23 are marker DNA; lanes 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 15, 18, 21, 22 are samples from rotavirus - negative stool, while other lanes are from rotavirus-positive stool.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102461&req=5

Figure 0001: TTGE gel showing bands obtained by electrophoresis of PCR products from neonate faeces using primers targeted at conserved bacterial 16S rDNA sequences representative of domain bacteria. Lanes at right and left extreme are with marker DNA. Bands 63 (Escherichia) and 97 (Bifidobacterium) are marked. Lanes 1 & 23 are marker DNA; lanes 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 15, 18, 21, 22 are samples from rotavirus - negative stool, while other lanes are from rotavirus-positive stool.
Mentions: The gels resulting from PCR amplification of conserved bacteria domain sequences followed by TTGE (evaluation of total bacterial diversity) were examined for bands at 100 possible positions. Two bands, corresponding to E. coli (band 63) and Bifidobacterium genus (band 97), were almost constant being found in 14 and 12 neonates respectively. Other bands were less dominant (band 90 in 9 neonates, band 27 in 5 neonates, band 44 in 2 neonates, and bands 32, 33, 35, 37, 46, 73 in one neonate each) (Fig. 1). The median number of bacterial bands in individual neonates in the control group was 3 (IQR 3-4) which was not statistically significantly different from the median of 3 (IQR 2-4) in the Rota+ group. Among the Rota group, the number of bands after clearance of rotavirus infection (Rota-, median 4, IQR 3-8) was not different from the number during rotavirus infection (Rota+).

Bottom Line: Neonates without and with rotavirus infection in the first week of life did not show significant differences in the median count of bifidobacteria (log 10 count 7.48 vs. 7.41) or enterobacteria (log 10 count 8.79 vs. 7.92).B. longum subsp. infantis was the sole bifidobacterial species colonizing the gut of Indian neonates.Asymptomatic rotavirus infection in the first month of life was not associated with alteration in faecal bifidobacteria or enterobacteria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastrointestinal Sciences, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India.

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: Bifidobacteria colonize the gut after the first week of life and remain an important component of the gut microbiota in infancy. This study was carried out to characterize the diversity and number of bifidobacteria colonizing the gut in Indian neonates and to investigate whether asymptomatic infection with rotavirus in the first month of life affected gut colonization by bifidobacteria.

Methods: DNA was isolated from faeces of 14 term-born neonates who were under surveillance for rotavirus infection. Bacterial and bifidobacterial diversity was evaluated by temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis (TTGE) of 16S rDNA amplified using total bacteria and bifidobacteria-specific primers. Real time PCR, targeting 16S rDNA, was used to quantitate faecal bifidobacteria and enterobacteria.

Results: TTGE of conserved bacterial 16S rDNA showed 3 dominant bands of which Escherichia coli (family Enterobacteriaceae) and Bifidobacterium (family Bifidobacteriaceae) were constant. TTGE of Bifidobacterium genus-specific DNA showed a single band in all neonates identified by sequencing as Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis. Faecal bifidobacterial counts (log 10 cfu/g faeces) ranged from 6.1 to 9.3 and enterobacterial counts from 6.3 to 9.5. Neonates without and with rotavirus infection in the first week of life did not show significant differences in the median count of bifidobacteria (log 10 count 7.48 vs. 7.41) or enterobacteria (log 10 count 8.79 vs. 7.92).

Interpretation and conclusions: B. longum subsp. infantis was the sole bifidobacterial species colonizing the gut of Indian neonates. Asymptomatic rotavirus infection in the first month of life was not associated with alteration in faecal bifidobacteria or enterobacteria.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus