Limits...
Evaluation of madurahydroxylactone as a slow release antibacterial implant coating.

Badar M, Hemmen K, Nimtz M, Stieve M, Stiesch M, Lenarz T, Hauser H, Möllmann U, Vogt S, Schnabelrauch M, Mueller PP - Open Biomed Eng J (2010)

Bottom Line: A combination of MHL with a broad spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic was used to create a coating that was active against all bacterial strains tested.The results indicated a delayed drug release from single layer coatings in the course of seven days.MHL was biocompatible in cell culture assays and could after a delay even serve as a cell adhesion substrate for human or murine cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Inhoffenstrasse 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Madurahydroxylactone (MHL), a secondary metabolite with antibacterial activity was evaluated for its suitability to generate controlled drug release coatings on medical implant materials. A smooth and firmly attached layer could be produced from a precursor solution on various metallic implant materials. In physiological salt solutions these coatings dissolved within a time period up to one week. A combination of MHL with a broad spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic was used to create a coating that was active against all bacterial strains tested. The time period during which the coating remained active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. The results indicated a delayed drug release from single layer coatings in the course of seven days. MHL was biocompatible in cell culture assays and could after a delay even serve as a cell adhesion substrate for human or murine cells. The findings indicate a potential for MHL for the generation of delayed release antimicrobial implant coatings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Prolonged antibacterial activity of MHL coatings with ciprofloxacin. Zirconium dioxide beads coated with a 1:1 (w/w) mixture of MHL with ciprofloxacin were incubated for 7 days in LB medium with daily exchange of the medium. The medium was inoculated with luminescent P. aeruginosa and the luminescence of the cultures after 5 hrs incubation at 37°C is shown. The supernatants were incubated with beads coated with MHL (filled circles), ciprofloxacin (open circles), DMSO (open triangles) or a combination of ciprofloxacin with MHL (filled triangles).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102426&req=5

Figure 7: Prolonged antibacterial activity of MHL coatings with ciprofloxacin. Zirconium dioxide beads coated with a 1:1 (w/w) mixture of MHL with ciprofloxacin were incubated for 7 days in LB medium with daily exchange of the medium. The medium was inoculated with luminescent P. aeruginosa and the luminescence of the cultures after 5 hrs incubation at 37°C is shown. The supernatants were incubated with beads coated with MHL (filled circles), ciprofloxacin (open circles), DMSO (open triangles) or a combination of ciprofloxacin with MHL (filled triangles).

Mentions: To establish a more sensitive antibiotic release scoring method genetically engineered luminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria were used. This allowed the contact-free quantification of the antibacterial effects in small assay volumes. The luminescence was linear proportional to the viable bacterial cell density over a wide range of several orders of magnitude (Fig. 6). Therefore the luminescence could be directly used as a measure of cell growth and viability. Using this assay the supernatant from the beads coated with a 1:1 (w/w) mixture of MHL and ciprofloxacin significantly inhibited bacterial proliferation until day 7 (Fig. 7). The highest efficacy was observed during the first day, with a gradual decrease over the time of the experiment and resulting in a marginal antibacterial effect at day 7. In contrast, the bactericidal effect of a pure ciprofloxacin coating was reduced over 90% after one day incubation. This is in good agreement with the absorption measurements of the supernatant of the incubation buffer, showing that this test was suitable and sufficiently sensitive. The results indicated that the combined coating of ciprofloxacin with MHL was gradually released when exposed to an aqueous environment.


Evaluation of madurahydroxylactone as a slow release antibacterial implant coating.

Badar M, Hemmen K, Nimtz M, Stieve M, Stiesch M, Lenarz T, Hauser H, Möllmann U, Vogt S, Schnabelrauch M, Mueller PP - Open Biomed Eng J (2010)

Prolonged antibacterial activity of MHL coatings with ciprofloxacin. Zirconium dioxide beads coated with a 1:1 (w/w) mixture of MHL with ciprofloxacin were incubated for 7 days in LB medium with daily exchange of the medium. The medium was inoculated with luminescent P. aeruginosa and the luminescence of the cultures after 5 hrs incubation at 37°C is shown. The supernatants were incubated with beads coated with MHL (filled circles), ciprofloxacin (open circles), DMSO (open triangles) or a combination of ciprofloxacin with MHL (filled triangles).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102426&req=5

Figure 7: Prolonged antibacterial activity of MHL coatings with ciprofloxacin. Zirconium dioxide beads coated with a 1:1 (w/w) mixture of MHL with ciprofloxacin were incubated for 7 days in LB medium with daily exchange of the medium. The medium was inoculated with luminescent P. aeruginosa and the luminescence of the cultures after 5 hrs incubation at 37°C is shown. The supernatants were incubated with beads coated with MHL (filled circles), ciprofloxacin (open circles), DMSO (open triangles) or a combination of ciprofloxacin with MHL (filled triangles).
Mentions: To establish a more sensitive antibiotic release scoring method genetically engineered luminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria were used. This allowed the contact-free quantification of the antibacterial effects in small assay volumes. The luminescence was linear proportional to the viable bacterial cell density over a wide range of several orders of magnitude (Fig. 6). Therefore the luminescence could be directly used as a measure of cell growth and viability. Using this assay the supernatant from the beads coated with a 1:1 (w/w) mixture of MHL and ciprofloxacin significantly inhibited bacterial proliferation until day 7 (Fig. 7). The highest efficacy was observed during the first day, with a gradual decrease over the time of the experiment and resulting in a marginal antibacterial effect at day 7. In contrast, the bactericidal effect of a pure ciprofloxacin coating was reduced over 90% after one day incubation. This is in good agreement with the absorption measurements of the supernatant of the incubation buffer, showing that this test was suitable and sufficiently sensitive. The results indicated that the combined coating of ciprofloxacin with MHL was gradually released when exposed to an aqueous environment.

Bottom Line: A combination of MHL with a broad spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic was used to create a coating that was active against all bacterial strains tested.The results indicated a delayed drug release from single layer coatings in the course of seven days.MHL was biocompatible in cell culture assays and could after a delay even serve as a cell adhesion substrate for human or murine cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Inhoffenstrasse 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Madurahydroxylactone (MHL), a secondary metabolite with antibacterial activity was evaluated for its suitability to generate controlled drug release coatings on medical implant materials. A smooth and firmly attached layer could be produced from a precursor solution on various metallic implant materials. In physiological salt solutions these coatings dissolved within a time period up to one week. A combination of MHL with a broad spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic was used to create a coating that was active against all bacterial strains tested. The time period during which the coating remained active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. The results indicated a delayed drug release from single layer coatings in the course of seven days. MHL was biocompatible in cell culture assays and could after a delay even serve as a cell adhesion substrate for human or murine cells. The findings indicate a potential for MHL for the generation of delayed release antimicrobial implant coatings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus