Limits...
Perspective taking eliminates differences in co-representation of out-group members' actions.

Müller BC, Kühn S, van Baaren RB, Dotsch R, Brass M, Dijksterhuis A - Exp Brain Res (2011)

Bottom Line: Results of study I demonstrated that actions performed by in-group members were co-represented while actions of out-group members were not.In study II, it was found that participants co-represented actions of out-group members when they had read about an out-group member and to take his perspective prior to the actual experiment.Possible explanations for these findings are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, PO Box 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands. B.Muller@psych.ru.nl

ABSTRACT
Coordinated action relies on shared representations between interaction partners: people co-represent actions of others in order to respond appropriately. However, little is known about the social factors that influence shared representations. We investigated whether actions performed by in-group and out-group members are represented differently, and if so, what role perspective-taking plays in this process. White participants performed a joint Simon task with an animated image of a hand with either white or black skin tone. Results of study I demonstrated that actions performed by in-group members were co-represented while actions of out-group members were not. In study II, it was found that participants co-represented actions of out-group members when they had read about an out-group member and to take his perspective prior to the actual experiment. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed.

Show MeSH
Sample frames of the whitehand (a) and black hand (b)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102202&req=5

Fig1: Sample frames of the whitehand (a) and black hand (b)

Mentions: The experiment consisted of a 2 (hand colour: white vs. black) × 2 (compatibility: compatible vs. incompatible) repeated-measures design, with hand colour and compatibility as within-subject factors. All participants performed the same joint Simon task, which is essentially a go/no-go task. They put their right hand on the right-handed side of a 17 LCD screen, where a single response key was located. At the centre of the screen, the standard Simon stimulus was presented, a rectangle surrounding three horizontally arranged circles. In each trial, one of the circles was coloured either green or red. In all conditions, an image of either a white or black left hand was displayed along the left-hand side of the screen in each trial. These hands differed only in skin colour and were matched for shape and size (Fig. 1). Participants were instructed to press the response key with their right hand whenever a red dot appeared on the screen, regardless of the position of the dot. The hand displayed along the left side ‘responded’ to green dots, thus pressing a button on participants’ no-go trials. A five-frame image sequence (38 ms per frame) was presented, showing the hand in a series of postures with the index finger approaching the response button. The first image of this sequence was used as a fixation display.Fig. 1


Perspective taking eliminates differences in co-representation of out-group members' actions.

Müller BC, Kühn S, van Baaren RB, Dotsch R, Brass M, Dijksterhuis A - Exp Brain Res (2011)

Sample frames of the whitehand (a) and black hand (b)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102202&req=5

Fig1: Sample frames of the whitehand (a) and black hand (b)
Mentions: The experiment consisted of a 2 (hand colour: white vs. black) × 2 (compatibility: compatible vs. incompatible) repeated-measures design, with hand colour and compatibility as within-subject factors. All participants performed the same joint Simon task, which is essentially a go/no-go task. They put their right hand on the right-handed side of a 17 LCD screen, where a single response key was located. At the centre of the screen, the standard Simon stimulus was presented, a rectangle surrounding three horizontally arranged circles. In each trial, one of the circles was coloured either green or red. In all conditions, an image of either a white or black left hand was displayed along the left-hand side of the screen in each trial. These hands differed only in skin colour and were matched for shape and size (Fig. 1). Participants were instructed to press the response key with their right hand whenever a red dot appeared on the screen, regardless of the position of the dot. The hand displayed along the left side ‘responded’ to green dots, thus pressing a button on participants’ no-go trials. A five-frame image sequence (38 ms per frame) was presented, showing the hand in a series of postures with the index finger approaching the response button. The first image of this sequence was used as a fixation display.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Results of study I demonstrated that actions performed by in-group members were co-represented while actions of out-group members were not.In study II, it was found that participants co-represented actions of out-group members when they had read about an out-group member and to take his perspective prior to the actual experiment.Possible explanations for these findings are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, PO Box 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands. B.Muller@psych.ru.nl

ABSTRACT
Coordinated action relies on shared representations between interaction partners: people co-represent actions of others in order to respond appropriately. However, little is known about the social factors that influence shared representations. We investigated whether actions performed by in-group and out-group members are represented differently, and if so, what role perspective-taking plays in this process. White participants performed a joint Simon task with an animated image of a hand with either white or black skin tone. Results of study I demonstrated that actions performed by in-group members were co-represented while actions of out-group members were not. In study II, it was found that participants co-represented actions of out-group members when they had read about an out-group member and to take his perspective prior to the actual experiment. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed.

Show MeSH