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Effect of methamphetamine dependence on inhibitory deficits in a novel human open-field paradigm.

Henry BL, Minassian A, van Rhenen M, Young JW, Geyer MA, Perry W, Translational Methamphetamine AIDS Research Center (TMARC) Gro - Psychopharmacology (Berl.) (2011)

Bottom Line: Methamphetamine (MA) is an addictive psychostimulant associated with neurocognitive impairment, including inhibitory deficits characterized by a reduced ability to control responses to stimuli.Greater object interaction was associated with impaired performance on the WCST, higher PANSS scores, and more frequent MA use in the past year.Utilization of this measure may enable assessment of inhibitory deficits relevant to drug-seeking behavior and facilitate development of intervention methods to reduce high-risk conduct in this population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. blhenry@ucsd.edu

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Methamphetamine (MA) is an addictive psychostimulant associated with neurocognitive impairment, including inhibitory deficits characterized by a reduced ability to control responses to stimuli. While various domains of inhibition such as exaggerated novelty seeking and perseveration have been assessed in rodents by quantifying activity in open-field tests, similar models have not been utilized in human substance abusers. We recently developed a cross-species translational human open-field paradigm, the human behavior pattern monitor (hBPM), consisting of an unfamiliar room containing novel and engaging objects. Previous work demonstrated that manic bipolar subjects exhibit a disinhibited pattern of behavior in the hBPM characterized by increased object interactions.

Objectives: In the current study, we examined the effect of MA dependence on inhibitory deficits using this paradigm. hBPM activity and object interactions were quantified in 16 abstinent MA-dependent individuals and 18 matched drug-free comparison subjects. The Wisconsin card sorting task (WCST) and the positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS) were administered to assess executive function and psychopathology.

Results: MA-dependent participants exhibited a significant increase in total object interactions, time spent with objects, and perseverative object interactions relative to comparison subjects. Greater object interaction was associated with impaired performance on the WCST, higher PANSS scores, and more frequent MA use in the past year.

Conclusions: Abstinent MA-dependent individuals exhibited impaired inhibition in the hBPM, displaying increased interaction with novel stimuli. Utilization of this measure may enable assessment of inhibitory deficits relevant to drug-seeking behavior and facilitate development of intervention methods to reduce high-risk conduct in this population.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The distribution of average sector entries across a grid of 64 sectors mapped over the hBPM (a) is illustrated for drug-free comparison (b) and MA-dependent (c) subjects. High intensity activity is denoted by brighter regions, while darker areas indicate low activity. The objects placed around the room are shown as white circles. While drug-free comparison subjects tended to wait near the door in the upper left portion of the hBPM, MA-dependent participants exhibited significantly more object-proximal sector entries throughout the room
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Fig1: The distribution of average sector entries across a grid of 64 sectors mapped over the hBPM (a) is illustrated for drug-free comparison (b) and MA-dependent (c) subjects. High intensity activity is denoted by brighter regions, while darker areas indicate low activity. The objects placed around the room are shown as white circles. While drug-free comparison subjects tended to wait near the door in the upper left portion of the hBPM, MA-dependent participants exhibited significantly more object-proximal sector entries throughout the room

Mentions: The MANOVA performed for hBPM data indicated a significant main effect of group [F(7,26) = 3.9, p < 0.01]. Subsequent univariate ANOVAs revealed that MA-dependent participants exhibited an increase in total object interactions [F(1,32) = 11.8, p < 0.01], time spent with objects [F(1,32) = 11.0, p < 0.01], percent perseverative interactions [F(1,32) = 15.9, p < 0.001], and showed a trend towards elevated object-proximal sector entries [F(1,32) = 3.8, p = 0.057] compared to the drug-free comparison group as illustrated in Fig. 1. Significant group differences were characterized by moderate to large effect sizes (Table 2). In contrast, total time spent walking and time in object-proximal sectors did not differ between the groups. In addition, none of the participants in either group wore any of the objects (e.g., putting the mask on their face), while an equal number (two subjects in each group) chose to open the cabinet drawers. However, chi-square analysis indicated that a significantly higher percentage of MA-dependent participants engaged in multiple object interactions relative to comparison (X2 = 5.2, p < 0.05).Fig. 1


Effect of methamphetamine dependence on inhibitory deficits in a novel human open-field paradigm.

Henry BL, Minassian A, van Rhenen M, Young JW, Geyer MA, Perry W, Translational Methamphetamine AIDS Research Center (TMARC) Gro - Psychopharmacology (Berl.) (2011)

The distribution of average sector entries across a grid of 64 sectors mapped over the hBPM (a) is illustrated for drug-free comparison (b) and MA-dependent (c) subjects. High intensity activity is denoted by brighter regions, while darker areas indicate low activity. The objects placed around the room are shown as white circles. While drug-free comparison subjects tended to wait near the door in the upper left portion of the hBPM, MA-dependent participants exhibited significantly more object-proximal sector entries throughout the room
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102201&req=5

Fig1: The distribution of average sector entries across a grid of 64 sectors mapped over the hBPM (a) is illustrated for drug-free comparison (b) and MA-dependent (c) subjects. High intensity activity is denoted by brighter regions, while darker areas indicate low activity. The objects placed around the room are shown as white circles. While drug-free comparison subjects tended to wait near the door in the upper left portion of the hBPM, MA-dependent participants exhibited significantly more object-proximal sector entries throughout the room
Mentions: The MANOVA performed for hBPM data indicated a significant main effect of group [F(7,26) = 3.9, p < 0.01]. Subsequent univariate ANOVAs revealed that MA-dependent participants exhibited an increase in total object interactions [F(1,32) = 11.8, p < 0.01], time spent with objects [F(1,32) = 11.0, p < 0.01], percent perseverative interactions [F(1,32) = 15.9, p < 0.001], and showed a trend towards elevated object-proximal sector entries [F(1,32) = 3.8, p = 0.057] compared to the drug-free comparison group as illustrated in Fig. 1. Significant group differences were characterized by moderate to large effect sizes (Table 2). In contrast, total time spent walking and time in object-proximal sectors did not differ between the groups. In addition, none of the participants in either group wore any of the objects (e.g., putting the mask on their face), while an equal number (two subjects in each group) chose to open the cabinet drawers. However, chi-square analysis indicated that a significantly higher percentage of MA-dependent participants engaged in multiple object interactions relative to comparison (X2 = 5.2, p < 0.05).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Methamphetamine (MA) is an addictive psychostimulant associated with neurocognitive impairment, including inhibitory deficits characterized by a reduced ability to control responses to stimuli.Greater object interaction was associated with impaired performance on the WCST, higher PANSS scores, and more frequent MA use in the past year.Utilization of this measure may enable assessment of inhibitory deficits relevant to drug-seeking behavior and facilitate development of intervention methods to reduce high-risk conduct in this population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. blhenry@ucsd.edu

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Methamphetamine (MA) is an addictive psychostimulant associated with neurocognitive impairment, including inhibitory deficits characterized by a reduced ability to control responses to stimuli. While various domains of inhibition such as exaggerated novelty seeking and perseveration have been assessed in rodents by quantifying activity in open-field tests, similar models have not been utilized in human substance abusers. We recently developed a cross-species translational human open-field paradigm, the human behavior pattern monitor (hBPM), consisting of an unfamiliar room containing novel and engaging objects. Previous work demonstrated that manic bipolar subjects exhibit a disinhibited pattern of behavior in the hBPM characterized by increased object interactions.

Objectives: In the current study, we examined the effect of MA dependence on inhibitory deficits using this paradigm. hBPM activity and object interactions were quantified in 16 abstinent MA-dependent individuals and 18 matched drug-free comparison subjects. The Wisconsin card sorting task (WCST) and the positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS) were administered to assess executive function and psychopathology.

Results: MA-dependent participants exhibited a significant increase in total object interactions, time spent with objects, and perseverative object interactions relative to comparison subjects. Greater object interaction was associated with impaired performance on the WCST, higher PANSS scores, and more frequent MA use in the past year.

Conclusions: Abstinent MA-dependent individuals exhibited impaired inhibition in the hBPM, displaying increased interaction with novel stimuli. Utilization of this measure may enable assessment of inhibitory deficits relevant to drug-seeking behavior and facilitate development of intervention methods to reduce high-risk conduct in this population.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus