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Giving a helping hand: effects of joint attention on mental rotation of body parts.

Böckler A, Knoblich G, Sebanz N - Exp Brain Res (2011)

Bottom Line: Research on joint attention has addressed both the effects of gaze following and the ability to share representations.Results revealed a significant flattening of the performance rotation curve when participants attended jointly (experiment 1).Thus, attending to objects together from opposite perspectives makes people adopt an allocentric rather than the default egocentric reference frame.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, & Behaviour, Centre for Cognition, Radboud University, P.O. Box 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands. A.Bockler@donders.ru.nl

ABSTRACT
Research on joint attention has addressed both the effects of gaze following and the ability to share representations. It is largely unknown, however, whether sharing attention also affects the perceptual processing of jointly attended objects. This study tested whether attending to stimuli with another person from opposite perspectives induces a tendency to adopt an allocentric rather than an egocentric reference frame. Pairs of participants performed a handedness task while individually or jointly attending to rotated hand stimuli from opposite sides. Results revealed a significant flattening of the performance rotation curve when participants attended jointly (experiment 1). The effect of joint attention was robust to manipulations of social interaction (cooperation versus competition, experiment 2), but was modulated by the extent to which an allocentric reference frame was primed (experiment 3). Thus, attending to objects together from opposite perspectives makes people adopt an allocentric rather than the default egocentric reference frame.

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Reaction times for 3rd PP trials in both attention conditions in experiments 1 and 2. Left Experiment 1. Middle Cooperation group. Right Competition group. The single-attention condition is depicted in grey (squares), the joint-attention condition in black (triangles)
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Fig4: Reaction times for 3rd PP trials in both attention conditions in experiments 1 and 2. Left Experiment 1. Middle Cooperation group. Right Competition group. The single-attention condition is depicted in grey (squares), the joint-attention condition in black (triangles)

Mentions: A 2 × 2 ANOVA with the factors perspective of first-hand picture and attention showed a significant main effect of the factor perspective of first-hand picture [RTs: F(1, 21) = 43.0, p < .001; errors: F(1, 21) = 23.3, p < .001] on slopes. This was due to the fact that the rotation curve was nearly flat in trials in which the first-hand picture was shown from a third-person perspective [RTs and errors: ts(21) < 1; see Fig. 4]. However, as can be seen in Fig. 4, RTs on 0° trials were faster than RTs on other trials (0° contrasted with all other degrees: [F(1, 21) = 15.8, p < .01]). When 0° was excluded from the analysis, slopes of the rotation curves were still not different from zero [ts(21) < 1]. Importantly, there was a significant two-way interaction of attention and perspective of first hand in RTs [F(1, 21) = 8.1, p < .01]. This was due to the fact that attention affected only 1st PP trials, but not 3rd PP trials [t(21) < 1]. There was no general difference in RTs between joint and single-attention trials [ts(21) < 1].


Giving a helping hand: effects of joint attention on mental rotation of body parts.

Böckler A, Knoblich G, Sebanz N - Exp Brain Res (2011)

Reaction times for 3rd PP trials in both attention conditions in experiments 1 and 2. Left Experiment 1. Middle Cooperation group. Right Competition group. The single-attention condition is depicted in grey (squares), the joint-attention condition in black (triangles)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102195&req=5

Fig4: Reaction times for 3rd PP trials in both attention conditions in experiments 1 and 2. Left Experiment 1. Middle Cooperation group. Right Competition group. The single-attention condition is depicted in grey (squares), the joint-attention condition in black (triangles)
Mentions: A 2 × 2 ANOVA with the factors perspective of first-hand picture and attention showed a significant main effect of the factor perspective of first-hand picture [RTs: F(1, 21) = 43.0, p < .001; errors: F(1, 21) = 23.3, p < .001] on slopes. This was due to the fact that the rotation curve was nearly flat in trials in which the first-hand picture was shown from a third-person perspective [RTs and errors: ts(21) < 1; see Fig. 4]. However, as can be seen in Fig. 4, RTs on 0° trials were faster than RTs on other trials (0° contrasted with all other degrees: [F(1, 21) = 15.8, p < .01]). When 0° was excluded from the analysis, slopes of the rotation curves were still not different from zero [ts(21) < 1]. Importantly, there was a significant two-way interaction of attention and perspective of first hand in RTs [F(1, 21) = 8.1, p < .01]. This was due to the fact that attention affected only 1st PP trials, but not 3rd PP trials [t(21) < 1]. There was no general difference in RTs between joint and single-attention trials [ts(21) < 1].

Bottom Line: Research on joint attention has addressed both the effects of gaze following and the ability to share representations.Results revealed a significant flattening of the performance rotation curve when participants attended jointly (experiment 1).Thus, attending to objects together from opposite perspectives makes people adopt an allocentric rather than the default egocentric reference frame.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, & Behaviour, Centre for Cognition, Radboud University, P.O. Box 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands. A.Bockler@donders.ru.nl

ABSTRACT
Research on joint attention has addressed both the effects of gaze following and the ability to share representations. It is largely unknown, however, whether sharing attention also affects the perceptual processing of jointly attended objects. This study tested whether attending to stimuli with another person from opposite perspectives induces a tendency to adopt an allocentric rather than an egocentric reference frame. Pairs of participants performed a handedness task while individually or jointly attending to rotated hand stimuli from opposite sides. Results revealed a significant flattening of the performance rotation curve when participants attended jointly (experiment 1). The effect of joint attention was robust to manipulations of social interaction (cooperation versus competition, experiment 2), but was modulated by the extent to which an allocentric reference frame was primed (experiment 3). Thus, attending to objects together from opposite perspectives makes people adopt an allocentric rather than the default egocentric reference frame.

Show MeSH