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Enhancing Jatropha oil extraction yield from the kernels assisted by a xylan-degrading bacterium to preserve protein structure.

Marasabessy A, Moeis MR, Sanders JP, Weusthuis RA - Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. (2011)

Bottom Line: A bacterial strain-which was marked as MB4 and identified by means of 16S rDNA sequencing and physiological characterization as either Bacillus pumilus or Bacillus altitudinis-enhanced the extraction yield of Jatropha oil.After MB4 assisted oil extraction, SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the majority of Jatropha proteins were preserved in the solid phase of the extraction residues.The advantages offered by this process are: protein in the residue can be further processed for other applications, no purified enzyme preparation is needed, and the resulting oil can be used for biodiesel production.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Valorisation of Plant Production Chains, Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands. ahmad.marasabessy@wur.nl

ABSTRACT
We investigated the use of bacterial cells isolated from paddy crab for the extraction of oil from Jatropha seed kernels in aqueous media while simultaneously preserving the protein structures of this protein-rich endosperm. A bacterial strain-which was marked as MB4 and identified by means of 16S rDNA sequencing and physiological characterization as either Bacillus pumilus or Bacillus altitudinis-enhanced the extraction yield of Jatropha oil. The incubation of an MB4 starter culture with preheated kernel slurry in aqueous media with the initial pH of 5.5 at 37 °C for 6 h liberated 73% w/w of the Jatropha oil. Since MB4 produces xylanases, it is suggested that strain MB4 facilitates oil liberation via degradation of hemicelluloses which form the oil-containing cell wall structure of the kernel. After MB4 assisted oil extraction, SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the majority of Jatropha proteins were preserved in the solid phase of the extraction residues. The advantages offered by this process are: protein in the residue can be further processed for other applications, no purified enzyme preparation is needed, and the resulting oil can be used for biodiesel production.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

SDS-PAGE analysis of Jatropha kernel proteins. Bands of proteins from Jatropha kernel showing molecular weight distribution after protein extraction from Jatropha kernel using (1) water, (2) 1.0 M NaCl, and (3) 0.055 M NaOH with different pretreatment: (a) non-heated, (b) preheated at 105 °C for 30 min, and (c) 121 °C for 30 min
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Fig2: SDS-PAGE analysis of Jatropha kernel proteins. Bands of proteins from Jatropha kernel showing molecular weight distribution after protein extraction from Jatropha kernel using (1) water, (2) 1.0 M NaCl, and (3) 0.055 M NaOH with different pretreatment: (a) non-heated, (b) preheated at 105 °C for 30 min, and (c) 121 °C for 30 min

Mentions: Because we wanted to study the effect of crab’s gut bacteria working at lower temperature on the extraction yield of oil from J. curcas kernels, internal factors within the kernels influencing oil liberation had to be minimized. Since the kernels contain microorganisms as well as seed enzymes which might interfere with the crab bacteria involved in oil liberation, we applied two different heat pretreatments on kernels, at 105 °C or 121 °C for 30 min, to deactivate enzymes and to kill microorganisms before being used for oil extraction. The proteins were extracted from the kernels and the extracts were subjected to SDS-PAGE analysis (Fig. 2). The solubility of proteins in water depends on various factors such as ionic strength and pH; therefore, 1 M NaCl and 0.055 M NaOH were also used as extractants besides water (Lestari et al. 2010). The protein pattern of the heat-treated kernels extracted with NaCl and NaOH was identical with that of the untreated kernels, showing that heat treatment at both 105 and 121 °C for 30 min did not affect the protein composition. Compared to the other samples, the untreated sample extracted with water is missing three small bands at molecular weights of approximately 20, 23, and 25 kDa, indicating that heat treatment increased the water solubility of the proteins.Fig. 2


Enhancing Jatropha oil extraction yield from the kernels assisted by a xylan-degrading bacterium to preserve protein structure.

Marasabessy A, Moeis MR, Sanders JP, Weusthuis RA - Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. (2011)

SDS-PAGE analysis of Jatropha kernel proteins. Bands of proteins from Jatropha kernel showing molecular weight distribution after protein extraction from Jatropha kernel using (1) water, (2) 1.0 M NaCl, and (3) 0.055 M NaOH with different pretreatment: (a) non-heated, (b) preheated at 105 °C for 30 min, and (c) 121 °C for 30 min
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102194&req=5

Fig2: SDS-PAGE analysis of Jatropha kernel proteins. Bands of proteins from Jatropha kernel showing molecular weight distribution after protein extraction from Jatropha kernel using (1) water, (2) 1.0 M NaCl, and (3) 0.055 M NaOH with different pretreatment: (a) non-heated, (b) preheated at 105 °C for 30 min, and (c) 121 °C for 30 min
Mentions: Because we wanted to study the effect of crab’s gut bacteria working at lower temperature on the extraction yield of oil from J. curcas kernels, internal factors within the kernels influencing oil liberation had to be minimized. Since the kernels contain microorganisms as well as seed enzymes which might interfere with the crab bacteria involved in oil liberation, we applied two different heat pretreatments on kernels, at 105 °C or 121 °C for 30 min, to deactivate enzymes and to kill microorganisms before being used for oil extraction. The proteins were extracted from the kernels and the extracts were subjected to SDS-PAGE analysis (Fig. 2). The solubility of proteins in water depends on various factors such as ionic strength and pH; therefore, 1 M NaCl and 0.055 M NaOH were also used as extractants besides water (Lestari et al. 2010). The protein pattern of the heat-treated kernels extracted with NaCl and NaOH was identical with that of the untreated kernels, showing that heat treatment at both 105 and 121 °C for 30 min did not affect the protein composition. Compared to the other samples, the untreated sample extracted with water is missing three small bands at molecular weights of approximately 20, 23, and 25 kDa, indicating that heat treatment increased the water solubility of the proteins.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: A bacterial strain-which was marked as MB4 and identified by means of 16S rDNA sequencing and physiological characterization as either Bacillus pumilus or Bacillus altitudinis-enhanced the extraction yield of Jatropha oil.After MB4 assisted oil extraction, SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the majority of Jatropha proteins were preserved in the solid phase of the extraction residues.The advantages offered by this process are: protein in the residue can be further processed for other applications, no purified enzyme preparation is needed, and the resulting oil can be used for biodiesel production.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Valorisation of Plant Production Chains, Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands. ahmad.marasabessy@wur.nl

ABSTRACT
We investigated the use of bacterial cells isolated from paddy crab for the extraction of oil from Jatropha seed kernels in aqueous media while simultaneously preserving the protein structures of this protein-rich endosperm. A bacterial strain-which was marked as MB4 and identified by means of 16S rDNA sequencing and physiological characterization as either Bacillus pumilus or Bacillus altitudinis-enhanced the extraction yield of Jatropha oil. The incubation of an MB4 starter culture with preheated kernel slurry in aqueous media with the initial pH of 5.5 at 37 °C for 6 h liberated 73% w/w of the Jatropha oil. Since MB4 produces xylanases, it is suggested that strain MB4 facilitates oil liberation via degradation of hemicelluloses which form the oil-containing cell wall structure of the kernel. After MB4 assisted oil extraction, SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the majority of Jatropha proteins were preserved in the solid phase of the extraction residues. The advantages offered by this process are: protein in the residue can be further processed for other applications, no purified enzyme preparation is needed, and the resulting oil can be used for biodiesel production.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus