Limits...
Joint action modulates motor system involvement during action observation in 3-year-olds.

Meyer M, Hunnius S, van Elk M, van Ede F, Bekkering H - Exp Brain Res (2011)

Bottom Line: We used a simple button-pressing game in which the two players acted in turns.Power in the mu- and beta-frequency bands was compared when children were not actively moving but observing the experimenter's actions when (1) they were engaged in the joint action game and (2) when they were not engaged.This motor system involvement might play an important role for children's joint action performance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, P.O. Box 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands. m.meyer@donders.ru.nl

ABSTRACT
When we are engaged in a joint action, we need to integrate our partner's actions with our own actions. Previous research has shown that in adults the involvement of one's own motor system is enhanced during observation of an action partner as compared to during observation of an individual actor. The aim of this study was to investigate whether similar motor system involvement is present at early stages of joint action development and whether it is related to joint action performance. In an EEG experiment with 3-year-old children, we assessed the children's brain activity and performance during a joint game with an adult experimenter. We used a simple button-pressing game in which the two players acted in turns. Power in the mu- and beta-frequency bands was compared when children were not actively moving but observing the experimenter's actions when (1) they were engaged in the joint action game and (2) when they were not engaged. Enhanced motor involvement during action observation as indicated by attenuated sensorimotor mu- and beta-power was found when the 3-year-olds were engaged in the joint action. This enhanced motor activation during action observation was associated with better joint action performance. The findings suggest that already in early childhood the motor system is differentially activated during action observation depending on the involvement in a joint action. This motor system involvement might play an important role for children's joint action performance.

Show MeSH
Power averaged over the time window of −450 to 0 ms in the a mu(7−11 Hz)- and b beta(17−21 Hz)-frequency range displayed as a function of condition (joint action observation; joint action) on an individual participant level. Vertical black lines represent standard errors of the means
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102188&req=5

Fig3: Power averaged over the time window of −450 to 0 ms in the a mu(7−11 Hz)- and b beta(17−21 Hz)-frequency range displayed as a function of condition (joint action observation; joint action) on an individual participant level. Vertical black lines represent standard errors of the means

Mentions: Subsequently, we investigated these effects on the basis of each individual participant. Figure 3a and b show the resulting average power for each participant separately for the two conditions (joint action observation condition: represented in blue; joint action condition: represented in green). Individual results in the mu-frequency range are represented in Fig. 3a. The same data pattern, namely lower average power for the joint action condition compared with the joint action observation condition, can be seen in six out of seven participants. Using single-subject statistics, this tendency in mu-power differences reaches significance in two participants (Participant 1: t(35.976) = 2.39, P = .000, r = .37; Participant 2: t(55) = 2.07, P = .043, r = .26). Figure 3b illustrates individual data for the beta-frequency range. Generally, all participants show the same data pattern as in the grand average. All seven participants exhibit the tendency of more attenuated power when observing Actor1 in the joint action condition than in the joint action observation condition, and this difference reaches significance in three out of seven participants using single-subject statistics (Participant 2: t(52.525) = 3.29, P = .002, r = .41; Participant 4: t(52.592) = 3.55, P = .001, r = .43; and Participant 6: t(24) = 2.12, P = .044, r = .39).Fig. 3


Joint action modulates motor system involvement during action observation in 3-year-olds.

Meyer M, Hunnius S, van Elk M, van Ede F, Bekkering H - Exp Brain Res (2011)

Power averaged over the time window of −450 to 0 ms in the a mu(7−11 Hz)- and b beta(17−21 Hz)-frequency range displayed as a function of condition (joint action observation; joint action) on an individual participant level. Vertical black lines represent standard errors of the means
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102188&req=5

Fig3: Power averaged over the time window of −450 to 0 ms in the a mu(7−11 Hz)- and b beta(17−21 Hz)-frequency range displayed as a function of condition (joint action observation; joint action) on an individual participant level. Vertical black lines represent standard errors of the means
Mentions: Subsequently, we investigated these effects on the basis of each individual participant. Figure 3a and b show the resulting average power for each participant separately for the two conditions (joint action observation condition: represented in blue; joint action condition: represented in green). Individual results in the mu-frequency range are represented in Fig. 3a. The same data pattern, namely lower average power for the joint action condition compared with the joint action observation condition, can be seen in six out of seven participants. Using single-subject statistics, this tendency in mu-power differences reaches significance in two participants (Participant 1: t(35.976) = 2.39, P = .000, r = .37; Participant 2: t(55) = 2.07, P = .043, r = .26). Figure 3b illustrates individual data for the beta-frequency range. Generally, all participants show the same data pattern as in the grand average. All seven participants exhibit the tendency of more attenuated power when observing Actor1 in the joint action condition than in the joint action observation condition, and this difference reaches significance in three out of seven participants using single-subject statistics (Participant 2: t(52.525) = 3.29, P = .002, r = .41; Participant 4: t(52.592) = 3.55, P = .001, r = .43; and Participant 6: t(24) = 2.12, P = .044, r = .39).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: We used a simple button-pressing game in which the two players acted in turns.Power in the mu- and beta-frequency bands was compared when children were not actively moving but observing the experimenter's actions when (1) they were engaged in the joint action game and (2) when they were not engaged.This motor system involvement might play an important role for children's joint action performance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, P.O. Box 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands. m.meyer@donders.ru.nl

ABSTRACT
When we are engaged in a joint action, we need to integrate our partner's actions with our own actions. Previous research has shown that in adults the involvement of one's own motor system is enhanced during observation of an action partner as compared to during observation of an individual actor. The aim of this study was to investigate whether similar motor system involvement is present at early stages of joint action development and whether it is related to joint action performance. In an EEG experiment with 3-year-old children, we assessed the children's brain activity and performance during a joint game with an adult experimenter. We used a simple button-pressing game in which the two players acted in turns. Power in the mu- and beta-frequency bands was compared when children were not actively moving but observing the experimenter's actions when (1) they were engaged in the joint action game and (2) when they were not engaged. Enhanced motor involvement during action observation as indicated by attenuated sensorimotor mu- and beta-power was found when the 3-year-olds were engaged in the joint action. This enhanced motor activation during action observation was associated with better joint action performance. The findings suggest that already in early childhood the motor system is differentially activated during action observation depending on the involvement in a joint action. This motor system involvement might play an important role for children's joint action performance.

Show MeSH