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Mistakes that affect others: an fMRI study on processing of own errors in a social context.

Radke S, de Lange FP, Ullsperger M, de Bruijn ER - Exp Brain Res (2011)

Bottom Line: Activation in posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC) and bilateral insula was increased for all errors, whereas errors that implied consequences for others specifically activated medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), an important part of the mentalizing system.The results demonstrate that performance monitoring in social contexts involves additional processes and brain structures compared with individual performance monitoring where errors only have consequences for the person committing them.Taking into account how one's behavior may affect others is particularly crucial for adapting behavior in interpersonal interactions and joint action.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands. s.radke@donders.ru.nl

ABSTRACT
In social contexts, errors have a special significance and often bear consequences for others. Thinking about others and drawing social inferences in interpersonal games engages the mentalizing system. We used neuroimaging to investigate the differences in brain activations between errors that affect only agents themselves and errors that additionally influence the payoffs of interaction partners. Activation in posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC) and bilateral insula was increased for all errors, whereas errors that implied consequences for others specifically activated medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), an important part of the mentalizing system. The results demonstrate that performance monitoring in social contexts involves additional processes and brain structures compared with individual performance monitoring where errors only have consequences for the person committing them. Taking into account how one's behavior may affect others is particularly crucial for adapting behavior in interpersonal interactions and joint action.

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Coronal and sagittal view of context-related brain activations. Increased activation in posterior parietal cortices (−34, −68, 52; 42, −66, 48), mPFC (10, 38, 24), and the left temporal pole (−42, 14, −16) was evident for the context which implied consequences for others (duo) compared with the condition that affected only the agents themselves. Thresholded at T = 3.36, corrected for multiple comparisons at the cluster level
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Fig3: Coronal and sagittal view of context-related brain activations. Increased activation in posterior parietal cortices (−34, −68, 52; 42, −66, 48), mPFC (10, 38, 24), and the left temporal pole (−42, 14, −16) was evident for the context which implied consequences for others (duo) compared with the condition that affected only the agents themselves. Thresholded at T = 3.36, corrected for multiple comparisons at the cluster level

Mentions: When comparing overall task-related activity in the context that implied consequences for others to overall task-related activity in the condition that concerned only the agents themselves (duo vs. solo), there was larger activation for the duo context in the posterior parietal cortices (−34, −68, 52; 42, −66, 48), mPFC (10, 38, 24) and the left temporal pole (−42, 14, −16) (see Fig. 3).Fig. 3


Mistakes that affect others: an fMRI study on processing of own errors in a social context.

Radke S, de Lange FP, Ullsperger M, de Bruijn ER - Exp Brain Res (2011)

Coronal and sagittal view of context-related brain activations. Increased activation in posterior parietal cortices (−34, −68, 52; 42, −66, 48), mPFC (10, 38, 24), and the left temporal pole (−42, 14, −16) was evident for the context which implied consequences for others (duo) compared with the condition that affected only the agents themselves. Thresholded at T = 3.36, corrected for multiple comparisons at the cluster level
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102186&req=5

Fig3: Coronal and sagittal view of context-related brain activations. Increased activation in posterior parietal cortices (−34, −68, 52; 42, −66, 48), mPFC (10, 38, 24), and the left temporal pole (−42, 14, −16) was evident for the context which implied consequences for others (duo) compared with the condition that affected only the agents themselves. Thresholded at T = 3.36, corrected for multiple comparisons at the cluster level
Mentions: When comparing overall task-related activity in the context that implied consequences for others to overall task-related activity in the condition that concerned only the agents themselves (duo vs. solo), there was larger activation for the duo context in the posterior parietal cortices (−34, −68, 52; 42, −66, 48), mPFC (10, 38, 24) and the left temporal pole (−42, 14, −16) (see Fig. 3).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Activation in posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC) and bilateral insula was increased for all errors, whereas errors that implied consequences for others specifically activated medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), an important part of the mentalizing system.The results demonstrate that performance monitoring in social contexts involves additional processes and brain structures compared with individual performance monitoring where errors only have consequences for the person committing them.Taking into account how one's behavior may affect others is particularly crucial for adapting behavior in interpersonal interactions and joint action.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands. s.radke@donders.ru.nl

ABSTRACT
In social contexts, errors have a special significance and often bear consequences for others. Thinking about others and drawing social inferences in interpersonal games engages the mentalizing system. We used neuroimaging to investigate the differences in brain activations between errors that affect only agents themselves and errors that additionally influence the payoffs of interaction partners. Activation in posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC) and bilateral insula was increased for all errors, whereas errors that implied consequences for others specifically activated medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), an important part of the mentalizing system. The results demonstrate that performance monitoring in social contexts involves additional processes and brain structures compared with individual performance monitoring where errors only have consequences for the person committing them. Taking into account how one's behavior may affect others is particularly crucial for adapting behavior in interpersonal interactions and joint action.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus