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Diversity of prophage DNA regions of Streptococcus agalactiae clonal lineages from adults and neonates with invasive infectious disease.

Salloum M, van der Mee-Marquet N, Valentin-Domelier AS, Quentin R - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: Group C prophage DNA fragments were found in 52% of adult invasive isolates, whereas 74% of neonatal invasive isolates had prophage DNA fragments of groups A and B.Differences in prophage DNA content were also found between serotypes, STs and CCs (P < 0.00001).These data indicate that the transduction mechanisms, i.e., gene transfer from one bacterium to another by a bacteriophage, underlying genetic recombination in S. agalactiae species, are specific to each intraspecies lineage and population of strains responsible for invasive diseases in adults and neonates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: EA 3854 Bactéries et Risque Materno-foetal, Institut Fédératif de Recherche 136 Agents Transmissibles et Infectiologie, Université François-Rabelais de Tours, UFR de Médecine, Tours, France.

ABSTRACT
The phylogenetic position and prophage DNA content of the genomes of 142 S. agalactiae (group-B streptococcus, GBS) isolates responsible for bacteremia and meningitis in adults and neonates were studied and compared. The distribution of the invasive isolates between the various serotypes, sequence types (STs) and clonal complexes (CCs) differed significantly between adult and neonatal isolates. Use of the neighbor-net algorithm with the PHI test revealed evidence for recombination in the population studied (PHI, P = 2.01 × 10(-6)), and the recombination-mutation ratio (R/M) was 6:7. Nevertheless, the estimated R/M ratio differed between CCs. Analysis of the prophage DNA regions of the genomes of the isolates assigned 90% of the isolates to five major prophage DNA groups: A to E. The mean number of prophage DNA fragments amplified per isolate varied from 2.6 for the isolates of prophage DNA group E to 4.0 for the isolates of prophage DNA group C. The isolates from adults and neonates with invasive diseases were distributed differently between the various prophage DNA groups (P < 0.00001). Group C prophage DNA fragments were found in 52% of adult invasive isolates, whereas 74% of neonatal invasive isolates had prophage DNA fragments of groups A and B. Differences in prophage DNA content were also found between serotypes, STs and CCs (P < 0.00001). All the ST-1 and CC1 isolates, mostly of serotype V, belonged to the prophage DNA group C, whereas 84% of the ST-17 and CC17 isolates, all of serotype III, belonged to prophage DNA groups A and B. These data indicate that the transduction mechanisms, i.e., gene transfer from one bacterium to another by a bacteriophage, underlying genetic recombination in S. agalactiae species, are specific to each intraspecies lineage and population of strains responsible for invasive diseases in adults and neonates.

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Distribution of 141 S. agalactiae isolates from adult (ACSF and AB) and neonatal (NCFS and NB) patients with invasive disease between prophage DNA groups, on the basis of PCR evaluations of the prophage content of isolates.Jaccard analysis generated a dendrogram of similarity values for the 10 prophage sequences described in table 1 (SYSTAT 12 software). Five major prophage DNA groups were defined (groups A to E). The mean number of prophage DNA fragments amplified from strains by PCR and the mean number of absolute deviations (Avedev) were calculated for each prophage DNA group. a anatomic origin of isolates; b serotype of isolates; ST, sequence-type; CC, clonal complex; NT, nontypeable.
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pone-0020256-g002: Distribution of 141 S. agalactiae isolates from adult (ACSF and AB) and neonatal (NCFS and NB) patients with invasive disease between prophage DNA groups, on the basis of PCR evaluations of the prophage content of isolates.Jaccard analysis generated a dendrogram of similarity values for the 10 prophage sequences described in table 1 (SYSTAT 12 software). Five major prophage DNA groups were defined (groups A to E). The mean number of prophage DNA fragments amplified from strains by PCR and the mean number of absolute deviations (Avedev) were calculated for each prophage DNA group. a anatomic origin of isolates; b serotype of isolates; ST, sequence-type; CC, clonal complex; NT, nontypeable.

Mentions: None of the prophage DNA fragments studied was detected by PCR in one isolate from a CSF sample from an adult. For each of the remaining 141 isolates, PCR amplified one to six of the 10 prophage DNA fragments studied. The genetic relationships between the prophage DNA regions of isolate genomes were plotted as a dendrogram (Fig. 2). This analysis assigned 90% of the isolates (127/141) to five major prophage DNA groups: A to E. The remaining 14 isolates had distantly related prophage DNA regions.


Diversity of prophage DNA regions of Streptococcus agalactiae clonal lineages from adults and neonates with invasive infectious disease.

Salloum M, van der Mee-Marquet N, Valentin-Domelier AS, Quentin R - PLoS ONE (2011)

Distribution of 141 S. agalactiae isolates from adult (ACSF and AB) and neonatal (NCFS and NB) patients with invasive disease between prophage DNA groups, on the basis of PCR evaluations of the prophage content of isolates.Jaccard analysis generated a dendrogram of similarity values for the 10 prophage sequences described in table 1 (SYSTAT 12 software). Five major prophage DNA groups were defined (groups A to E). The mean number of prophage DNA fragments amplified from strains by PCR and the mean number of absolute deviations (Avedev) were calculated for each prophage DNA group. a anatomic origin of isolates; b serotype of isolates; ST, sequence-type; CC, clonal complex; NT, nontypeable.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102099&req=5

pone-0020256-g002: Distribution of 141 S. agalactiae isolates from adult (ACSF and AB) and neonatal (NCFS and NB) patients with invasive disease between prophage DNA groups, on the basis of PCR evaluations of the prophage content of isolates.Jaccard analysis generated a dendrogram of similarity values for the 10 prophage sequences described in table 1 (SYSTAT 12 software). Five major prophage DNA groups were defined (groups A to E). The mean number of prophage DNA fragments amplified from strains by PCR and the mean number of absolute deviations (Avedev) were calculated for each prophage DNA group. a anatomic origin of isolates; b serotype of isolates; ST, sequence-type; CC, clonal complex; NT, nontypeable.
Mentions: None of the prophage DNA fragments studied was detected by PCR in one isolate from a CSF sample from an adult. For each of the remaining 141 isolates, PCR amplified one to six of the 10 prophage DNA fragments studied. The genetic relationships between the prophage DNA regions of isolate genomes were plotted as a dendrogram (Fig. 2). This analysis assigned 90% of the isolates (127/141) to five major prophage DNA groups: A to E. The remaining 14 isolates had distantly related prophage DNA regions.

Bottom Line: Group C prophage DNA fragments were found in 52% of adult invasive isolates, whereas 74% of neonatal invasive isolates had prophage DNA fragments of groups A and B.Differences in prophage DNA content were also found between serotypes, STs and CCs (P < 0.00001).These data indicate that the transduction mechanisms, i.e., gene transfer from one bacterium to another by a bacteriophage, underlying genetic recombination in S. agalactiae species, are specific to each intraspecies lineage and population of strains responsible for invasive diseases in adults and neonates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: EA 3854 Bactéries et Risque Materno-foetal, Institut Fédératif de Recherche 136 Agents Transmissibles et Infectiologie, Université François-Rabelais de Tours, UFR de Médecine, Tours, France.

ABSTRACT
The phylogenetic position and prophage DNA content of the genomes of 142 S. agalactiae (group-B streptococcus, GBS) isolates responsible for bacteremia and meningitis in adults and neonates were studied and compared. The distribution of the invasive isolates between the various serotypes, sequence types (STs) and clonal complexes (CCs) differed significantly between adult and neonatal isolates. Use of the neighbor-net algorithm with the PHI test revealed evidence for recombination in the population studied (PHI, P = 2.01 × 10(-6)), and the recombination-mutation ratio (R/M) was 6:7. Nevertheless, the estimated R/M ratio differed between CCs. Analysis of the prophage DNA regions of the genomes of the isolates assigned 90% of the isolates to five major prophage DNA groups: A to E. The mean number of prophage DNA fragments amplified per isolate varied from 2.6 for the isolates of prophage DNA group E to 4.0 for the isolates of prophage DNA group C. The isolates from adults and neonates with invasive diseases were distributed differently between the various prophage DNA groups (P < 0.00001). Group C prophage DNA fragments were found in 52% of adult invasive isolates, whereas 74% of neonatal invasive isolates had prophage DNA fragments of groups A and B. Differences in prophage DNA content were also found between serotypes, STs and CCs (P < 0.00001). All the ST-1 and CC1 isolates, mostly of serotype V, belonged to the prophage DNA group C, whereas 84% of the ST-17 and CC17 isolates, all of serotype III, belonged to prophage DNA groups A and B. These data indicate that the transduction mechanisms, i.e., gene transfer from one bacterium to another by a bacteriophage, underlying genetic recombination in S. agalactiae species, are specific to each intraspecies lineage and population of strains responsible for invasive diseases in adults and neonates.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus