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Terrestrial invasion of pomatiopsid gastropods in the heavy-snow region of the Japanese Archipelago.

Kameda Y, Kato M - BMC Evol. Biol. (2011)

Bottom Line: Gastropod mollusks are one of the most successful animals that have diversified in the fully terrestrial habitat.Because snow coverage maintains stable temperatures and high humidity on the ground surface, heavy-snow conditions may have paved the way for these organisms from freshwater to land via mountain streamlets by preventing winter desiccation in mountain valleys.The fact that the terrestrialization of Pomatiopsidae occurred only in year-round wet environments, but not in seasonally dried regions, provides new insight into ancient molluscan terrestrialization.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Yoshida-nihonmatsu-cho, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan. yuichi.c.kameda@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Gastropod mollusks are one of the most successful animals that have diversified in the fully terrestrial habitat. They have evolved terrestrial taxa in more than nine lineages, most of which originated during the Paleozoic or Mesozoic. The rissooidean gastropod family Pomatiopsidae is one of the few groups that have evolved fully terrestrial taxa during the late Cenozoic. The pomatiopsine diversity is particularly high in the Japanese Archipelago and the terrestrial taxa occur only in this region. In this study, we conducted thorough samplings of Japanese pomatiopsid species and performed molecular phylogenetic analyses to explore the patterns of diversification and terrestrial invasion.

Results: Molecular phylogenetic analyses revealed that Japanese Pomatiopsinae derived from multiple colonization of the Eurasian Continent and that subsequent habitat shifts from aquatic to terrestrial life occurred at least twice within two Japanese endemic lineages. Each lineage comprises amphibious and terrestrial species, both of which are confined to the mountains in heavy-snow regions facing the Japan Sea. The estimated divergence time suggested that diversification of these terrestrial lineages started in the Late Miocene, when active orogenesis of the Japanese landmass and establishment of snowy conditions began.

Conclusions: The terrestrial invasion of Japanese Pomatiopsinae occurred at least twice beside the mountain streamlets of heavy-snow regions, which is considered the first case of this event in the area. Because snow coverage maintains stable temperatures and high humidity on the ground surface, heavy-snow conditions may have paved the way for these organisms from freshwater to land via mountain streamlets by preventing winter desiccation in mountain valleys. The fact that the terrestrialization of Pomatiopsidae occurred only in year-round wet environments, but not in seasonally dried regions, provides new insight into ancient molluscan terrestrialization.

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A map showing worldwide distribution of Pomatiopsine genera and Triculinae (after Davis [11]). Terrestrial taxa occur only on the Japanese Archipelago located in East Asia (Blanfordia). Tomichia and Coxiella include several halophilic species occuring on saline lakes.
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Figure 1: A map showing worldwide distribution of Pomatiopsine genera and Triculinae (after Davis [11]). Terrestrial taxa occur only on the Japanese Archipelago located in East Asia (Blanfordia). Tomichia and Coxiella include several halophilic species occuring on saline lakes.

Mentions: Pomatiopsidae, which are well known as intermediate hosts of Asian schistosomes [14-18], comprises two subfamilies, Triculinae and Pomatiopsinae. The former radiated as aquatic snails in freshwater habitats in Southeast Asia [11,19], whereas the latter are distributed worldwide (Figure 1) and possesses various lifestyles from aquatic to amphibious, littoral, halophilic, and even terrestrial [11,20]. The generic diversity of Pomatiopsinae is particularly high in the Japanese Archipelago, where four of the eight genera including two endemics, are recorded (Figures 1 &2) [11]. The diversity of Japanese Pomatiopsinae is based on two characteristics, i.e. unique habitats of the endemic genera, and their distribution.


Terrestrial invasion of pomatiopsid gastropods in the heavy-snow region of the Japanese Archipelago.

Kameda Y, Kato M - BMC Evol. Biol. (2011)

A map showing worldwide distribution of Pomatiopsine genera and Triculinae (after Davis [11]). Terrestrial taxa occur only on the Japanese Archipelago located in East Asia (Blanfordia). Tomichia and Coxiella include several halophilic species occuring on saline lakes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102040&req=5

Figure 1: A map showing worldwide distribution of Pomatiopsine genera and Triculinae (after Davis [11]). Terrestrial taxa occur only on the Japanese Archipelago located in East Asia (Blanfordia). Tomichia and Coxiella include several halophilic species occuring on saline lakes.
Mentions: Pomatiopsidae, which are well known as intermediate hosts of Asian schistosomes [14-18], comprises two subfamilies, Triculinae and Pomatiopsinae. The former radiated as aquatic snails in freshwater habitats in Southeast Asia [11,19], whereas the latter are distributed worldwide (Figure 1) and possesses various lifestyles from aquatic to amphibious, littoral, halophilic, and even terrestrial [11,20]. The generic diversity of Pomatiopsinae is particularly high in the Japanese Archipelago, where four of the eight genera including two endemics, are recorded (Figures 1 &2) [11]. The diversity of Japanese Pomatiopsinae is based on two characteristics, i.e. unique habitats of the endemic genera, and their distribution.

Bottom Line: Gastropod mollusks are one of the most successful animals that have diversified in the fully terrestrial habitat.Because snow coverage maintains stable temperatures and high humidity on the ground surface, heavy-snow conditions may have paved the way for these organisms from freshwater to land via mountain streamlets by preventing winter desiccation in mountain valleys.The fact that the terrestrialization of Pomatiopsidae occurred only in year-round wet environments, but not in seasonally dried regions, provides new insight into ancient molluscan terrestrialization.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Yoshida-nihonmatsu-cho, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan. yuichi.c.kameda@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Gastropod mollusks are one of the most successful animals that have diversified in the fully terrestrial habitat. They have evolved terrestrial taxa in more than nine lineages, most of which originated during the Paleozoic or Mesozoic. The rissooidean gastropod family Pomatiopsidae is one of the few groups that have evolved fully terrestrial taxa during the late Cenozoic. The pomatiopsine diversity is particularly high in the Japanese Archipelago and the terrestrial taxa occur only in this region. In this study, we conducted thorough samplings of Japanese pomatiopsid species and performed molecular phylogenetic analyses to explore the patterns of diversification and terrestrial invasion.

Results: Molecular phylogenetic analyses revealed that Japanese Pomatiopsinae derived from multiple colonization of the Eurasian Continent and that subsequent habitat shifts from aquatic to terrestrial life occurred at least twice within two Japanese endemic lineages. Each lineage comprises amphibious and terrestrial species, both of which are confined to the mountains in heavy-snow regions facing the Japan Sea. The estimated divergence time suggested that diversification of these terrestrial lineages started in the Late Miocene, when active orogenesis of the Japanese landmass and establishment of snowy conditions began.

Conclusions: The terrestrial invasion of Japanese Pomatiopsinae occurred at least twice beside the mountain streamlets of heavy-snow regions, which is considered the first case of this event in the area. Because snow coverage maintains stable temperatures and high humidity on the ground surface, heavy-snow conditions may have paved the way for these organisms from freshwater to land via mountain streamlets by preventing winter desiccation in mountain valleys. The fact that the terrestrialization of Pomatiopsidae occurred only in year-round wet environments, but not in seasonally dried regions, provides new insight into ancient molluscan terrestrialization.

Show MeSH