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The paediatric flat foot and general anthropometry in 140 Australian school children aged 7 - 10 years.

Evans AM - J Foot Ankle Res (2011)

Bottom Line: Many studies have found a positive relationship between increased body weight and flat foot posture in children.In contrast to previous studies, the implication of these results is that heavy children have less flat feet.Further investigation is warranted using a standardized approach to assessment and a larger sample of children to test this apparent contradiction.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Health Science, Division of Health Science, University of South Australia, City East Campus, North Terrace, Adelaide 5000, South Australia. angela.evans@unisa.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: Many studies have found a positive relationship between increased body weight and flat foot posture in children.

Methods: From a study population of 140 children aged seven to 10 years, a sample of 31 children with flat feet was identified by screening with the FPI-6. Basic anthropometric measures were compared between subjects with and without flat feet as designated.

Results: The results of this study, in contrast to many others, question the association of flat feet and heavy children. A significant relationship between foot posture and weight (FPI (L) r = -0.186 (p < 0.05), FPI(R) r = -0.194 (p < 0.05), waist girth (FPI (L) r = -0.213 (p < 0.05), FPI(R) r = -0.228 (p < 0.01) and BMI (FPI (L) r = -0.243 (p < 0.01), FPI(R) r = -0.263 (p < 0.01) was identified, but was both weak and inverse.

Conclusions: This study presents results which conflict with those of many previous investigations addressing the relationship between children's weight and foot posture. In contrast to previous studies, the implication of these results is that heavy children have less flat feet. Further investigation is warranted using a standardized approach to assessment and a larger sample of children to test this apparent contradiction.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The FPI-6 total scores for both left and right feet of the study population (N = 140), children aged seven to 10 years.
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Figure 2: The FPI-6 total scores for both left and right feet of the study population (N = 140), children aged seven to 10 years.

Mentions: The foot posture histograms for the study population (N = 140) (Figure 2) showed normal curve distribution for both left and right FPI-6 total scores. The FPI-6 left foot total score averaged 4.12 (± 2.2) and the FPI-6 right foot total score averaged 3.74 (± 2.3).


The paediatric flat foot and general anthropometry in 140 Australian school children aged 7 - 10 years.

Evans AM - J Foot Ankle Res (2011)

The FPI-6 total scores for both left and right feet of the study population (N = 140), children aged seven to 10 years.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3102032&req=5

Figure 2: The FPI-6 total scores for both left and right feet of the study population (N = 140), children aged seven to 10 years.
Mentions: The foot posture histograms for the study population (N = 140) (Figure 2) showed normal curve distribution for both left and right FPI-6 total scores. The FPI-6 left foot total score averaged 4.12 (± 2.2) and the FPI-6 right foot total score averaged 3.74 (± 2.3).

Bottom Line: Many studies have found a positive relationship between increased body weight and flat foot posture in children.In contrast to previous studies, the implication of these results is that heavy children have less flat feet.Further investigation is warranted using a standardized approach to assessment and a larger sample of children to test this apparent contradiction.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Health Science, Division of Health Science, University of South Australia, City East Campus, North Terrace, Adelaide 5000, South Australia. angela.evans@unisa.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: Many studies have found a positive relationship between increased body weight and flat foot posture in children.

Methods: From a study population of 140 children aged seven to 10 years, a sample of 31 children with flat feet was identified by screening with the FPI-6. Basic anthropometric measures were compared between subjects with and without flat feet as designated.

Results: The results of this study, in contrast to many others, question the association of flat feet and heavy children. A significant relationship between foot posture and weight (FPI (L) r = -0.186 (p < 0.05), FPI(R) r = -0.194 (p < 0.05), waist girth (FPI (L) r = -0.213 (p < 0.05), FPI(R) r = -0.228 (p < 0.01) and BMI (FPI (L) r = -0.243 (p < 0.01), FPI(R) r = -0.263 (p < 0.01) was identified, but was both weak and inverse.

Conclusions: This study presents results which conflict with those of many previous investigations addressing the relationship between children's weight and foot posture. In contrast to previous studies, the implication of these results is that heavy children have less flat feet. Further investigation is warranted using a standardized approach to assessment and a larger sample of children to test this apparent contradiction.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus