Limits...
Differential trends in the rising incidence of endometrial cancer by type: data from a UK population-based registry from 1994 to 2006.

Evans T, Sany O, Pearmain P, Ganesan R, Blann A, Sundar S - Br. J. Cancer (2011)

Bottom Line: This study investigates the observed incidence trends of the two types, the age, stage, and socioeconomic distribution of this increase and survival outcome.While outcome for type 1 cancer has improved, 1-year survival in type 2 cancer is unchanged from 73.1% in 1994 to 74.3%, P=0.089 and 5-year survival decreased from 55.1% to 40.9%, P=0.001.Urgent research is needed to investigate prevention strategies in type 1 and improve therapy in type 2 cancers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: West Midlands Cancer Intelligence Unit, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecological cancer in the western world, the incidence increasing in the United Kingdom by over 40% since 1993. Two types of endometrial cancer exist - oestrogen-dependent type 1 with good prognosis and non-oestrogen-dependent type 2 with poor prognosis. The histopathological distribution of the increase in endometrial cancer is unknown. This study investigates the observed incidence trends of the two types, the age, stage, and socioeconomic distribution of this increase and survival outcome.

Methods: Data were analysed from 6867 women with endometrial cancer registered between 1994 and 2006, at a UK population-based cancer registry.

Results: Increased endometrial cancer incidence is confined to type 1 cancers with a significant increase in age standardised incidence rate (ASR) from 12.0 per 100,000 (confidence interval (CI) 10.7-13.2) in 1994 to 16.3 per 100,000 (CI 14.9-17.7), P<0.001 in 2006, while ASR of type 2 cancer changed from 2.5 per 100,000 (CI 2.0-3.1) in 1994 to 2.2 per 100,000 (CI 1.7-2.7) in 2006, which was not statistically significant P>0.05. Increase in type 1 cancer is most marked in age groups 60-69 years (P<0.001) and 70-79 years (P<0.001) and distributed equally among socioeconomic quintiles. While outcome for type 1 cancer has improved, 1-year survival in type 2 cancer is unchanged from 73.1% in 1994 to 74.3%, P=0.089 and 5-year survival decreased from 55.1% to 40.9%, P=0.001.

Conclusion: Increased incidence in endometrial cancer is confined to type 1 cancers, seen most in the 60-79 age groups and across all socioeconomic quintiles. Survival in type 2 cancer has decreased significantly. Urgent research is needed to investigate prevention strategies in type 1 and improve therapy in type 2 cancers.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Differential trends in endometrial cancer incidence across the two types. Age standardised incidence rates and confidence intervals are shown.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3101940&req=5

fig1: Differential trends in endometrial cancer incidence across the two types. Age standardised incidence rates and confidence intervals are shown.

Mentions: An overall increase in the ASR of endometrial cancer was observed over the time period, from 16.1 per 100 000 population (CI 14.6–17.5) in 1994 to 19.6 per 100 000 population (CI 18.1–21.1) in 2006. Analysis by type of endometrial cancer revealed a marked differential trend in incidence by type. The ASRs of type 1 cancers showed a highly significant linear increase from 12.0 per 100 000 (CI 10.7–13.2) in 1994 to 16.3 (CI 14.9–17.7) in 2006, r=0.94, P<0.001. However, the ASR of type 2 cancers remained static; 2.5 per 100 000 (CI 2.0–3.1) in 1993 compared with 2.2 per 100 000 (CI 1.7–2.7) in 2006, r=−0.15, P-value=0.633. This is represented graphically in Figure 1.


Differential trends in the rising incidence of endometrial cancer by type: data from a UK population-based registry from 1994 to 2006.

Evans T, Sany O, Pearmain P, Ganesan R, Blann A, Sundar S - Br. J. Cancer (2011)

Differential trends in endometrial cancer incidence across the two types. Age standardised incidence rates and confidence intervals are shown.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3101940&req=5

fig1: Differential trends in endometrial cancer incidence across the two types. Age standardised incidence rates and confidence intervals are shown.
Mentions: An overall increase in the ASR of endometrial cancer was observed over the time period, from 16.1 per 100 000 population (CI 14.6–17.5) in 1994 to 19.6 per 100 000 population (CI 18.1–21.1) in 2006. Analysis by type of endometrial cancer revealed a marked differential trend in incidence by type. The ASRs of type 1 cancers showed a highly significant linear increase from 12.0 per 100 000 (CI 10.7–13.2) in 1994 to 16.3 (CI 14.9–17.7) in 2006, r=0.94, P<0.001. However, the ASR of type 2 cancers remained static; 2.5 per 100 000 (CI 2.0–3.1) in 1993 compared with 2.2 per 100 000 (CI 1.7–2.7) in 2006, r=−0.15, P-value=0.633. This is represented graphically in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: This study investigates the observed incidence trends of the two types, the age, stage, and socioeconomic distribution of this increase and survival outcome.While outcome for type 1 cancer has improved, 1-year survival in type 2 cancer is unchanged from 73.1% in 1994 to 74.3%, P=0.089 and 5-year survival decreased from 55.1% to 40.9%, P=0.001.Urgent research is needed to investigate prevention strategies in type 1 and improve therapy in type 2 cancers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: West Midlands Cancer Intelligence Unit, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecological cancer in the western world, the incidence increasing in the United Kingdom by over 40% since 1993. Two types of endometrial cancer exist - oestrogen-dependent type 1 with good prognosis and non-oestrogen-dependent type 2 with poor prognosis. The histopathological distribution of the increase in endometrial cancer is unknown. This study investigates the observed incidence trends of the two types, the age, stage, and socioeconomic distribution of this increase and survival outcome.

Methods: Data were analysed from 6867 women with endometrial cancer registered between 1994 and 2006, at a UK population-based cancer registry.

Results: Increased endometrial cancer incidence is confined to type 1 cancers with a significant increase in age standardised incidence rate (ASR) from 12.0 per 100,000 (confidence interval (CI) 10.7-13.2) in 1994 to 16.3 per 100,000 (CI 14.9-17.7), P<0.001 in 2006, while ASR of type 2 cancer changed from 2.5 per 100,000 (CI 2.0-3.1) in 1994 to 2.2 per 100,000 (CI 1.7-2.7) in 2006, which was not statistically significant P>0.05. Increase in type 1 cancer is most marked in age groups 60-69 years (P<0.001) and 70-79 years (P<0.001) and distributed equally among socioeconomic quintiles. While outcome for type 1 cancer has improved, 1-year survival in type 2 cancer is unchanged from 73.1% in 1994 to 74.3%, P=0.089 and 5-year survival decreased from 55.1% to 40.9%, P=0.001.

Conclusion: Increased incidence in endometrial cancer is confined to type 1 cancers, seen most in the 60-79 age groups and across all socioeconomic quintiles. Survival in type 2 cancer has decreased significantly. Urgent research is needed to investigate prevention strategies in type 1 and improve therapy in type 2 cancers.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus