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Circulating tumour cells in the central and the peripheral venous compartment in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

Peeters DJ, Van den Eynden GG, van Dam PJ, Prové A, Benoy IH, van Dam PA, Vermeulen PB, Pauwels P, Peeters M, Van Laere SJ, Dirix LY - Br. J. Cancer (2011)

Bottom Line: The number of CTC was found to be significantly higher in CVB (median: 43.5; range: 0-4036) than in PVB (median: 33; range: 0-4013) (P=0.001).When analysing samples pairwise, CTC counts were found to be significantly higher in CVB than in PVB in 12 out of 26 patients with detectable CTC.In contrast, only 2 out of 26 patients had higher CTC counts in PVB as compared with CVB, whereas in 12 remaining patients no significant difference was seen.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Translational Cancer Research Group, Laboratory of Pathology, Antwerp University/Oncology Centre, GZA Hospitals St-Augustinus, Antwerp 2610, Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Background: The enumeration of circulating tumour cells (CTC) has prognostic significance in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) and monitoring of CTC levels over time has considerable potential to guide treatment decisions. However, little is known on CTC kinetics in the human bloodstream.

Methods: In this study, we compared the number of CTC in both 7.5 ml central venous blood (CVB) and 7.5 ml peripheral venous blood (PVB) from 30 patients with MBC starting with a new line of chemotherapy.

Results: The number of CTC was found to be significantly higher in CVB (median: 43.5; range: 0-4036) than in PVB (median: 33; range: 0-4013) (P=0.001). When analysing samples pairwise, CTC counts were found to be significantly higher in CVB than in PVB in 12 out of 26 patients with detectable CTC. In contrast, only 2 out of 26 patients had higher CTC counts in PVB as compared with CVB, whereas in 12 remaining patients no significant difference was seen. The pattern of CTC distribution was independent of the sites of metastatic involvement.

Conclusion: A substantial difference in the number of CTC was observed between CVB and PVB of patients with MBC. Registration of the site of blood collection is warranted in studies evaluating the role of CTC assessment in these patients.

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Comparison of CTC size in CVB and PVB. (A) Calculation method for the area of an individual CTC as a measure for size. (B) Frequency curves of CTC sizes in CVB and PVB for one illustrative patient. A cutoff for size in CVB was applied at the maximal size measured in PVB. (C) Formula for the calculation of the ‘contribution score' for size to the numerical difference in CTC between CVB and PVB.
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fig2: Comparison of CTC size in CVB and PVB. (A) Calculation method for the area of an individual CTC as a measure for size. (B) Frequency curves of CTC sizes in CVB and PVB for one illustrative patient. A cutoff for size in CVB was applied at the maximal size measured in PVB. (C) Formula for the calculation of the ‘contribution score' for size to the numerical difference in CTC between CVB and PVB.

Mentions: We compared the size of the CTC at different vascular compartments. CTC were measured on screen in two dimensions and size was estimated based on the geometrical area of an ellipse as shown in Figure 2. Mean size of CTC in CVB and PVB of the same patient was compared only in those patients with at least five measurable CTC in both compartments. Overall, mean CTC area measured 77.59±4.68 μm2 in CVB and 62.28±5.02 μm2 in PVB, respectively (P<0.001). When analysing samples pairwise, CTC measured in CVB were significantly larger than CTC measured in PVB in 11 out of 22 patients (50%). In the other 11 patients no statistically significant difference in average CTC size between CVB and PVB was observed. Furthermore, we calculated a score to estimate the contribution of size to the numerical difference in CTC counts between CVB and PVB as demonstrated in Figure 2B and C. When applying a cutoff for CTC size in CVB at the maximal CTC size measured in PVB, on average 19% (range: 0–48%) of the numerical difference in CTC counts between CVB and PVB could be explained on the basis of size (Table 2; Figure 2C).


Circulating tumour cells in the central and the peripheral venous compartment in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

Peeters DJ, Van den Eynden GG, van Dam PJ, Prové A, Benoy IH, van Dam PA, Vermeulen PB, Pauwels P, Peeters M, Van Laere SJ, Dirix LY - Br. J. Cancer (2011)

Comparison of CTC size in CVB and PVB. (A) Calculation method for the area of an individual CTC as a measure for size. (B) Frequency curves of CTC sizes in CVB and PVB for one illustrative patient. A cutoff for size in CVB was applied at the maximal size measured in PVB. (C) Formula for the calculation of the ‘contribution score' for size to the numerical difference in CTC between CVB and PVB.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3101936&req=5

fig2: Comparison of CTC size in CVB and PVB. (A) Calculation method for the area of an individual CTC as a measure for size. (B) Frequency curves of CTC sizes in CVB and PVB for one illustrative patient. A cutoff for size in CVB was applied at the maximal size measured in PVB. (C) Formula for the calculation of the ‘contribution score' for size to the numerical difference in CTC between CVB and PVB.
Mentions: We compared the size of the CTC at different vascular compartments. CTC were measured on screen in two dimensions and size was estimated based on the geometrical area of an ellipse as shown in Figure 2. Mean size of CTC in CVB and PVB of the same patient was compared only in those patients with at least five measurable CTC in both compartments. Overall, mean CTC area measured 77.59±4.68 μm2 in CVB and 62.28±5.02 μm2 in PVB, respectively (P<0.001). When analysing samples pairwise, CTC measured in CVB were significantly larger than CTC measured in PVB in 11 out of 22 patients (50%). In the other 11 patients no statistically significant difference in average CTC size between CVB and PVB was observed. Furthermore, we calculated a score to estimate the contribution of size to the numerical difference in CTC counts between CVB and PVB as demonstrated in Figure 2B and C. When applying a cutoff for CTC size in CVB at the maximal CTC size measured in PVB, on average 19% (range: 0–48%) of the numerical difference in CTC counts between CVB and PVB could be explained on the basis of size (Table 2; Figure 2C).

Bottom Line: The number of CTC was found to be significantly higher in CVB (median: 43.5; range: 0-4036) than in PVB (median: 33; range: 0-4013) (P=0.001).When analysing samples pairwise, CTC counts were found to be significantly higher in CVB than in PVB in 12 out of 26 patients with detectable CTC.In contrast, only 2 out of 26 patients had higher CTC counts in PVB as compared with CVB, whereas in 12 remaining patients no significant difference was seen.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Translational Cancer Research Group, Laboratory of Pathology, Antwerp University/Oncology Centre, GZA Hospitals St-Augustinus, Antwerp 2610, Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Background: The enumeration of circulating tumour cells (CTC) has prognostic significance in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) and monitoring of CTC levels over time has considerable potential to guide treatment decisions. However, little is known on CTC kinetics in the human bloodstream.

Methods: In this study, we compared the number of CTC in both 7.5 ml central venous blood (CVB) and 7.5 ml peripheral venous blood (PVB) from 30 patients with MBC starting with a new line of chemotherapy.

Results: The number of CTC was found to be significantly higher in CVB (median: 43.5; range: 0-4036) than in PVB (median: 33; range: 0-4013) (P=0.001). When analysing samples pairwise, CTC counts were found to be significantly higher in CVB than in PVB in 12 out of 26 patients with detectable CTC. In contrast, only 2 out of 26 patients had higher CTC counts in PVB as compared with CVB, whereas in 12 remaining patients no significant difference was seen. The pattern of CTC distribution was independent of the sites of metastatic involvement.

Conclusion: A substantial difference in the number of CTC was observed between CVB and PVB of patients with MBC. Registration of the site of blood collection is warranted in studies evaluating the role of CTC assessment in these patients.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus