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Clinicians' attitudes towards clinical trials of cancer therapy.

Ford E, Jenkins V, Fallowfield L, Stuart N, Farewell D, Farewell V - Br. J. Cancer (2011)

Bottom Line: Eighty-seven clinicians (78%) returned questionnaires.Research orientation was higher in physicians than surgeons and higher in specialist centres than district hospitals.Results have been used to inform training interventions for clinicians targeting the problem of low and selective accrual.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Research UK Psychosocial Oncology Group, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QG, UK. e.ford@sussex.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: Patient accrual into cancer clinical trials remains at low levels. This survey elicited attitudes and practices of cancer clinicians towards clinical trials.

Method: The 43-item Clinicians Attitudes to Clinical Trials Questionnaire was completed by participants in an intervention study aimed at improving multi-disciplinary involvement in randomised trials. Responses from 13 items were summed to form a research-orientation score.

Results: Eighty-seven clinicians (78%) returned questionnaires. Physicians, more often than surgeons, chose to prioritise prolonging a patient's life, recruited ≥50% of patients into trials and attended more research-focussed conferences. Clinicians at specialist centres were more positive about trials with no-treatment arms than those at district general hospitals, more likely to believe clinician, rather than patient reluctance to participate was the greater obstacle to trial accrual, and preferred national and international to local recognition. Clinicians belonging to breast and colorectal teams were less disappointed about not enrolling patients in trials and more accepting of no-treatment arm trials. Research orientation was higher in physicians than surgeons and higher in specialist centres than district hospitals.

Conclusions: This study provides greater understanding of clinicians' attitudes to trials. Results have been used to inform training interventions for clinicians targeting the problem of low and selective accrual.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Overall ‘Teams Talking About Trials' project. *Data presented in this paper.
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fig1: Overall ‘Teams Talking About Trials' project. *Data presented in this paper.

Mentions: Greater understanding of clinicians' attitudes to clinical trials is needed to target the problem of low and selective accrual (Castel et al, 2006). The present survey elicited clinician attitudes towards clinical trials in their practice using a modified version of the Physician Orientation Profile (Taylor and Kelner, 1987). The aims were to assess clinician responses for differences by specialty, type of hospital, type of team, and geographic region and to estimate a research-orientation score for each clinician, again looking for differences between groups. The data used for this study are a component of a large Cancer Research UK funded prospective study examining multidisciplinary team members' communication skills and involvement in clinical trials; primarily randomised, controlled, phase 3 trials. The main study examined different aspects of trial recruitment, including involvement of individual team members in clinical trials; assessment of the clarity of health professionals' communication by patients recruited into clinical trials, and attitudes towards RCTs (Figure 1). The attitudes of patients to RCTs (Jenkins et al, 2010) and that of clinicians to RCTs were collected for each multi-disciplinary team (MDT) to provide an evidence-based argument for encouraging clinicians to consider approaching more patients about trials. The clinician data are presented here.


Clinicians' attitudes towards clinical trials of cancer therapy.

Ford E, Jenkins V, Fallowfield L, Stuart N, Farewell D, Farewell V - Br. J. Cancer (2011)

Overall ‘Teams Talking About Trials' project. *Data presented in this paper.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3101903&req=5

fig1: Overall ‘Teams Talking About Trials' project. *Data presented in this paper.
Mentions: Greater understanding of clinicians' attitudes to clinical trials is needed to target the problem of low and selective accrual (Castel et al, 2006). The present survey elicited clinician attitudes towards clinical trials in their practice using a modified version of the Physician Orientation Profile (Taylor and Kelner, 1987). The aims were to assess clinician responses for differences by specialty, type of hospital, type of team, and geographic region and to estimate a research-orientation score for each clinician, again looking for differences between groups. The data used for this study are a component of a large Cancer Research UK funded prospective study examining multidisciplinary team members' communication skills and involvement in clinical trials; primarily randomised, controlled, phase 3 trials. The main study examined different aspects of trial recruitment, including involvement of individual team members in clinical trials; assessment of the clarity of health professionals' communication by patients recruited into clinical trials, and attitudes towards RCTs (Figure 1). The attitudes of patients to RCTs (Jenkins et al, 2010) and that of clinicians to RCTs were collected for each multi-disciplinary team (MDT) to provide an evidence-based argument for encouraging clinicians to consider approaching more patients about trials. The clinician data are presented here.

Bottom Line: Eighty-seven clinicians (78%) returned questionnaires.Research orientation was higher in physicians than surgeons and higher in specialist centres than district hospitals.Results have been used to inform training interventions for clinicians targeting the problem of low and selective accrual.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Research UK Psychosocial Oncology Group, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QG, UK. e.ford@sussex.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: Patient accrual into cancer clinical trials remains at low levels. This survey elicited attitudes and practices of cancer clinicians towards clinical trials.

Method: The 43-item Clinicians Attitudes to Clinical Trials Questionnaire was completed by participants in an intervention study aimed at improving multi-disciplinary involvement in randomised trials. Responses from 13 items were summed to form a research-orientation score.

Results: Eighty-seven clinicians (78%) returned questionnaires. Physicians, more often than surgeons, chose to prioritise prolonging a patient's life, recruited ≥50% of patients into trials and attended more research-focussed conferences. Clinicians at specialist centres were more positive about trials with no-treatment arms than those at district general hospitals, more likely to believe clinician, rather than patient reluctance to participate was the greater obstacle to trial accrual, and preferred national and international to local recognition. Clinicians belonging to breast and colorectal teams were less disappointed about not enrolling patients in trials and more accepting of no-treatment arm trials. Research orientation was higher in physicians than surgeons and higher in specialist centres than district hospitals.

Conclusions: This study provides greater understanding of clinicians' attitudes to trials. Results have been used to inform training interventions for clinicians targeting the problem of low and selective accrual.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus