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Anesthetic and airway management of a child with a large upper-lip hemangioma.

Bajwa SS, Panda A, Bajwa SK, Singh A, Parmar SS, Singh K - Saudi J Anaesth (2011)

Bottom Line: Airway management of the child posed the challenge for us as the size and site of the lesion carried the risk of difficult intubation and possible risk of extensive hemorrhage.All the requisite equipment for difficult airway management was made ready.The surgical and postoperative period was uneventful and the child was discharged the next day to be followed up after 2 weeks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Gian Sagar Medical College & Hospital, Ram Nagar, Banur, Punjab, India.

ABSTRACT
An 11-month-old male child weighing 8 kg was brought to the plastic surgery out-patient department by his parents with chief complaints of sudden increase in size of a swelling over the upper lip and difficulty in feeding for the last 7 days. It was diagnosed as a case of hemangioma of the upper lip. All the routine and special investigations including coagulation profile of the child were normal. The child was planned for ablation of feeding vessels along with intralesional steroid injection. Airway management of the child posed the challenge for us as the size and site of the lesion carried the risk of difficult intubation and possible risk of extensive hemorrhage. All the requisite equipment for difficult airway management was made ready. We were able to intubate the child with miller number-2 blade from the left angle of mouth without putting much pressure on the swelling. The surgical and postoperative period was uneventful and the child was discharged the next day to be followed up after 2 weeks.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Frontal view picture of the child showing the large sized haemangioma of the upper lip
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Figure 0001: Frontal view picture of the child showing the large sized haemangioma of the upper lip

Mentions: An 11-month-old male child was brought to the plastic surgery OPD of our institute by his parents with the chief complaints of increase in size of a swelling over upper lip with difficulty in oral intake for the last 1 week. On eliciting the history, it was revealed that the lesion was present since birth and had been gradually enlarging. The size of the lesion was measured to be 5.5×3.5×1.5 cm and was diagnosed as a case of hemangioma upper lip [Figures 1 and 2]. Previously, the patient did not have much difficulty in feeding but the difficulty rose since 1 week as the lesion had suddenly enlarged. He was being fed by the spoon from the angle of the mouth. Considering the age of the child, size of the lesion and most importantly the site of the hemangioma, it was planned to ablate and strangulate the vessels during the first stage so as to decrease the size of lesion before proceeding for surgical excision. Preanesthetic assessment revealed a very narrow mouth opening with difficulty in assessing the mallampatti grading [Figures 1 and 2]. All the investigations were within normal limits including the coagulogarm and weight of the child was found to be 8 kg.


Anesthetic and airway management of a child with a large upper-lip hemangioma.

Bajwa SS, Panda A, Bajwa SK, Singh A, Parmar SS, Singh K - Saudi J Anaesth (2011)

Frontal view picture of the child showing the large sized haemangioma of the upper lip
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3101761&req=5

Figure 0001: Frontal view picture of the child showing the large sized haemangioma of the upper lip
Mentions: An 11-month-old male child was brought to the plastic surgery OPD of our institute by his parents with the chief complaints of increase in size of a swelling over upper lip with difficulty in oral intake for the last 1 week. On eliciting the history, it was revealed that the lesion was present since birth and had been gradually enlarging. The size of the lesion was measured to be 5.5×3.5×1.5 cm and was diagnosed as a case of hemangioma upper lip [Figures 1 and 2]. Previously, the patient did not have much difficulty in feeding but the difficulty rose since 1 week as the lesion had suddenly enlarged. He was being fed by the spoon from the angle of the mouth. Considering the age of the child, size of the lesion and most importantly the site of the hemangioma, it was planned to ablate and strangulate the vessels during the first stage so as to decrease the size of lesion before proceeding for surgical excision. Preanesthetic assessment revealed a very narrow mouth opening with difficulty in assessing the mallampatti grading [Figures 1 and 2]. All the investigations were within normal limits including the coagulogarm and weight of the child was found to be 8 kg.

Bottom Line: Airway management of the child posed the challenge for us as the size and site of the lesion carried the risk of difficult intubation and possible risk of extensive hemorrhage.All the requisite equipment for difficult airway management was made ready.The surgical and postoperative period was uneventful and the child was discharged the next day to be followed up after 2 weeks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Gian Sagar Medical College & Hospital, Ram Nagar, Banur, Punjab, India.

ABSTRACT
An 11-month-old male child weighing 8 kg was brought to the plastic surgery out-patient department by his parents with chief complaints of sudden increase in size of a swelling over the upper lip and difficulty in feeding for the last 7 days. It was diagnosed as a case of hemangioma of the upper lip. All the routine and special investigations including coagulation profile of the child were normal. The child was planned for ablation of feeding vessels along with intralesional steroid injection. Airway management of the child posed the challenge for us as the size and site of the lesion carried the risk of difficult intubation and possible risk of extensive hemorrhage. All the requisite equipment for difficult airway management was made ready. We were able to intubate the child with miller number-2 blade from the left angle of mouth without putting much pressure on the swelling. The surgical and postoperative period was uneventful and the child was discharged the next day to be followed up after 2 weeks.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus