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A reappraisal of saphenous vein grafting.

Yuan SM, Jing H - Ann Saudi Med (2011 Jan-Feb)

Bottom Line: Implications associated with saphenous vein grafting in vascular access surgery for the purpose of dialysis and chemotherapy are considerable.Vascular cuffs and patches have been developed as an important and effective means of enhancing the patency rates of the grafts by linking the synthetic material to the receipt vessel.We review the versatile roles that saphenous vein grafting has played as well as its current status in therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Clinical Medicine, Nanjing University, Jinling Hospital, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China.

ABSTRACT
Autologous saphenous vein grafting has been broadly used as a bypass conduit, interposition graft, and patch graft in a variety of operations in cardiac, thoracic, neurovascular, general vascular, vascular access, and urology surgeries, since they are superior to prosthetic veins. Modified saphenous vein grafts (SVG), including spiral and cylindrical grafts, and vein cuffs or patches, are employed in vascular revascularization to satisfy the large size of the receipt vessels or to obtain a better patency. A loop SVG helps flap survival in a muscle flap transfer in plastic and reconstructive surgery. For dialysis or transfusion purposes, a straight or loop arteriovenous fistula created in the forearm or the thigh with an SVG has acceptable patency. The saphenous vein has even been used as a stent cover to minimize the potential complications of standard angioplasty technique. However, the use of saphenous vein grafting is now largely diminished in treating cerebrovascular disorders, superior vena cava syndrome, and visceral revascularization due to the introduction of angioplasty and stenting techniques. The SVG remains the preferable biomaterial in coronary artery bypass, coronary osteoplasty, free flap transfer, and surgical treatment of Peyronie disease. Implications associated with saphenous vein grafting in vascular access surgery for the purpose of dialysis and chemotherapy are considerable. Vascular cuffs and patches have been developed as an important and effective means of enhancing the patency rates of the grafts by linking the synthetic material to the receipt vessel. In addition, saphenous veins can be a cell source for tissue engineering. We review the versatile roles that saphenous vein grafting has played as well as its current status in therapy.

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Cylindrical vein graft.
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Figure 0005: Cylindrical vein graft.

Mentions: SV grafting has even been useful when remodeled into a cylinder configuration for a size-match purpose for the construction of either jugular or portal veins. Urayama et al4 and Sakamoto et al5 respectively utilized such remodeled SVGs where the saphenous vein was split longitudinally and sutured side-to-side (Figure 5) with good results. SV grafting added its versatility as catheter conduit for arterial infusion chemotherapy to treat hepatocellular carcinomas and metastatic liver cancer after hepatectomy or in unresectable patients with satisfactory perfusion.59


A reappraisal of saphenous vein grafting.

Yuan SM, Jing H - Ann Saudi Med (2011 Jan-Feb)

Cylindrical vein graft.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3101728&req=5

Figure 0005: Cylindrical vein graft.
Mentions: SV grafting has even been useful when remodeled into a cylinder configuration for a size-match purpose for the construction of either jugular or portal veins. Urayama et al4 and Sakamoto et al5 respectively utilized such remodeled SVGs where the saphenous vein was split longitudinally and sutured side-to-side (Figure 5) with good results. SV grafting added its versatility as catheter conduit for arterial infusion chemotherapy to treat hepatocellular carcinomas and metastatic liver cancer after hepatectomy or in unresectable patients with satisfactory perfusion.59

Bottom Line: Implications associated with saphenous vein grafting in vascular access surgery for the purpose of dialysis and chemotherapy are considerable.Vascular cuffs and patches have been developed as an important and effective means of enhancing the patency rates of the grafts by linking the synthetic material to the receipt vessel.We review the versatile roles that saphenous vein grafting has played as well as its current status in therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Clinical Medicine, Nanjing University, Jinling Hospital, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China.

ABSTRACT
Autologous saphenous vein grafting has been broadly used as a bypass conduit, interposition graft, and patch graft in a variety of operations in cardiac, thoracic, neurovascular, general vascular, vascular access, and urology surgeries, since they are superior to prosthetic veins. Modified saphenous vein grafts (SVG), including spiral and cylindrical grafts, and vein cuffs or patches, are employed in vascular revascularization to satisfy the large size of the receipt vessels or to obtain a better patency. A loop SVG helps flap survival in a muscle flap transfer in plastic and reconstructive surgery. For dialysis or transfusion purposes, a straight or loop arteriovenous fistula created in the forearm or the thigh with an SVG has acceptable patency. The saphenous vein has even been used as a stent cover to minimize the potential complications of standard angioplasty technique. However, the use of saphenous vein grafting is now largely diminished in treating cerebrovascular disorders, superior vena cava syndrome, and visceral revascularization due to the introduction of angioplasty and stenting techniques. The SVG remains the preferable biomaterial in coronary artery bypass, coronary osteoplasty, free flap transfer, and surgical treatment of Peyronie disease. Implications associated with saphenous vein grafting in vascular access surgery for the purpose of dialysis and chemotherapy are considerable. Vascular cuffs and patches have been developed as an important and effective means of enhancing the patency rates of the grafts by linking the synthetic material to the receipt vessel. In addition, saphenous veins can be a cell source for tissue engineering. We review the versatile roles that saphenous vein grafting has played as well as its current status in therapy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus