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18F-FDG PET/CT imaging in oncology.

Almuhaideb A, Papathanasiou N, Bomanji J - Ann Saudi Med (2011 Jan-Feb)

Bottom Line: It also allows for monitoring response to therapy and permitting timely modification of therapeutic regimens.In about 27% of the patients, the course of management is changed.This review provides guidance for oncologists/radiotherapists and clinical and surgical specialists on the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in oncology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London Hospitals National Health Service Trust, London, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Accurate diagnosis and staging are essential for the optimal management of cancer patients. Positron emission tomography with 2-deoxy-2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-D-glucose integrated with computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) has emerged as a powerful imaging tool for the detection of various cancers. The combined acquisition of PET and CT has synergistic advantages over PET or CT alone and minimizes their individual limitations. It is a valuable tool for staging and restaging of some tumors and has an important role in the detection of recurrence in asymptomatic patients with rising tumor marker levels and patients with negative or equivocal findings on conventional imaging techniques. It also allows for monitoring response to therapy and permitting timely modification of therapeutic regimens. In about 27% of the patients, the course of management is changed. This review provides guidance for oncologists/radiotherapists and clinical and surgical specialists on the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in oncology.

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A 73-year-old woman who came for initial staging of non-small cell lung cancer. Maximum-intensity-projection (MIP) image (left panel), CT images (middle panels) and fused images (right panels) of 18F-FDG PET/CT show the primary tumor (arrow head) with mediastinal nodal metastases (black arrow). Incidental right iliac fossa small focal uptake (yellow arrow) is noted, which cross-correlated to a small soft tissue lesion in the cecum and turned out to be a synchronous primary adenocarcinoma.
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Figure 0001: A 73-year-old woman who came for initial staging of non-small cell lung cancer. Maximum-intensity-projection (MIP) image (left panel), CT images (middle panels) and fused images (right panels) of 18F-FDG PET/CT show the primary tumor (arrow head) with mediastinal nodal metastases (black arrow). Incidental right iliac fossa small focal uptake (yellow arrow) is noted, which cross-correlated to a small soft tissue lesion in the cecum and turned out to be a synchronous primary adenocarcinoma.

Mentions: Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Accurate diagnosis, staging and restaging are essential for the optimal therapeutic management of cancer patients. Positron emission tomography (PET) with 2-deoxy-2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG), an analogue of glucose, provides valuable functional information based on the increased glucose uptake and glycolysis of cancer cells and depicts metabolic abnormalities before morphological alterations occur. 18F-FDG PET/CT acquires PET and CT data in the same imaging session and allows accurate anatomical localization of the lesions detected on the 18F-FDG PET scan (Figure 1). Following its introduction, integrated PET/CT rapidly gained clinical acceptance, and in the last decade it has become an important imaging tool in routine clinical oncology (Table 1).


18F-FDG PET/CT imaging in oncology.

Almuhaideb A, Papathanasiou N, Bomanji J - Ann Saudi Med (2011 Jan-Feb)

A 73-year-old woman who came for initial staging of non-small cell lung cancer. Maximum-intensity-projection (MIP) image (left panel), CT images (middle panels) and fused images (right panels) of 18F-FDG PET/CT show the primary tumor (arrow head) with mediastinal nodal metastases (black arrow). Incidental right iliac fossa small focal uptake (yellow arrow) is noted, which cross-correlated to a small soft tissue lesion in the cecum and turned out to be a synchronous primary adenocarcinoma.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3101722&req=5

Figure 0001: A 73-year-old woman who came for initial staging of non-small cell lung cancer. Maximum-intensity-projection (MIP) image (left panel), CT images (middle panels) and fused images (right panels) of 18F-FDG PET/CT show the primary tumor (arrow head) with mediastinal nodal metastases (black arrow). Incidental right iliac fossa small focal uptake (yellow arrow) is noted, which cross-correlated to a small soft tissue lesion in the cecum and turned out to be a synchronous primary adenocarcinoma.
Mentions: Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Accurate diagnosis, staging and restaging are essential for the optimal therapeutic management of cancer patients. Positron emission tomography (PET) with 2-deoxy-2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG), an analogue of glucose, provides valuable functional information based on the increased glucose uptake and glycolysis of cancer cells and depicts metabolic abnormalities before morphological alterations occur. 18F-FDG PET/CT acquires PET and CT data in the same imaging session and allows accurate anatomical localization of the lesions detected on the 18F-FDG PET scan (Figure 1). Following its introduction, integrated PET/CT rapidly gained clinical acceptance, and in the last decade it has become an important imaging tool in routine clinical oncology (Table 1).

Bottom Line: It also allows for monitoring response to therapy and permitting timely modification of therapeutic regimens.In about 27% of the patients, the course of management is changed.This review provides guidance for oncologists/radiotherapists and clinical and surgical specialists on the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in oncology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London Hospitals National Health Service Trust, London, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Accurate diagnosis and staging are essential for the optimal management of cancer patients. Positron emission tomography with 2-deoxy-2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-D-glucose integrated with computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) has emerged as a powerful imaging tool for the detection of various cancers. The combined acquisition of PET and CT has synergistic advantages over PET or CT alone and minimizes their individual limitations. It is a valuable tool for staging and restaging of some tumors and has an important role in the detection of recurrence in asymptomatic patients with rising tumor marker levels and patients with negative or equivocal findings on conventional imaging techniques. It also allows for monitoring response to therapy and permitting timely modification of therapeutic regimens. In about 27% of the patients, the course of management is changed. This review provides guidance for oncologists/radiotherapists and clinical and surgical specialists on the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in oncology.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus