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Unconscious knowledge: A survey.

Augusto LM - Adv Cogn Psychol (2011)

Bottom Line: The concept of unconscious knowledge is fundamental for an understanding of human thought processes and mentation in general; however, the psychological community at large is not familiar with it.It shows that the field has already a defined history and discusses some of the features that all kinds of unconscious knowledge seem to share at a deeper level.With the aim of promoting further research, we discuss the main challenges which the postulation of unconscious cognition faces within the psychological community.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Philosophy, Faculty of Letters, University of Porto, Portugal.

ABSTRACT
The concept of unconscious knowledge is fundamental for an understanding of human thought processes and mentation in general; however, the psychological community at large is not familiar with it. This paper offers a survey of the main psychological research currently being carried out into cognitive processes, and examines pathways that can be integrated into a discipline of unconscious knowledge. It shows that the field has already a defined history and discusses some of the features that all kinds of unconscious knowledge seem to share at a deeper level. With the aim of promoting further research, we discuss the main challenges which the postulation of unconscious cognition faces within the psychological community.

No MeSH data available.


Examples of Artificial Grammars. Grammar A originates the									following strings: xmxrttvtm, vttvtrm, xmmxrvm, vtvtm, xxrvtm,									etc. Adapted from “Unconscious Knowledge of Artificial Grammars									is Applied Strategically” by Z. Dienes, G. T. M. Altmann, L.									Kwann, and A. Goode, 1995, Journal of Experimental										Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 21, p.									1323; and from ”Transfer of Syntactic Structure in Synthetic									Languages” by A. S. Reber, 1969, Journal of Experimental										Psychology, 81, p. 116 (Grammar A).
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Figure 2: Examples of Artificial Grammars. Grammar A originates the following strings: xmxrttvtm, vttvtrm, xmmxrvm, vtvtm, xxrvtm, etc. Adapted from “Unconscious Knowledge of Artificial Grammars is Applied Strategically” by Z. Dienes, G. T. M. Altmann, L. Kwann, and A. Goode, 1995, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 21, p. 1323; and from ”Transfer of Syntactic Structure in Synthetic Languages” by A. S. Reber, 1969, Journal of Experimental Psychology, 81, p. 116 (Grammar A).

Mentions: Research into implicit learning with artificial grammars was initiated by A. S. Reber in the late 1960s (Reber, 1967, 1969) and sparked an abundant literature on this phenomenon. This abundance reflects the complexity of the overall claim that, exposed to strings of sentences produced by artificial grammars (see Figure 2) without a learning strategy, subjects actually acquire unconscious knowledge of the grammars. To support this claim, there is the finding that subjects in this experimental paradigm can distinguish grammatical from non-grammatical strings well above chance, while showing no confidence regarding this skill and being incapable of verbalizing their knowledge of the grammars:


Unconscious knowledge: A survey.

Augusto LM - Adv Cogn Psychol (2011)

Examples of Artificial Grammars. Grammar A originates the									following strings: xmxrttvtm, vttvtrm, xmmxrvm, vtvtm, xxrvtm,									etc. Adapted from “Unconscious Knowledge of Artificial Grammars									is Applied Strategically” by Z. Dienes, G. T. M. Altmann, L.									Kwann, and A. Goode, 1995, Journal of Experimental										Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 21, p.									1323; and from ”Transfer of Syntactic Structure in Synthetic									Languages” by A. S. Reber, 1969, Journal of Experimental										Psychology, 81, p. 116 (Grammar A).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3101524&req=5

Figure 2: Examples of Artificial Grammars. Grammar A originates the following strings: xmxrttvtm, vttvtrm, xmmxrvm, vtvtm, xxrvtm, etc. Adapted from “Unconscious Knowledge of Artificial Grammars is Applied Strategically” by Z. Dienes, G. T. M. Altmann, L. Kwann, and A. Goode, 1995, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 21, p. 1323; and from ”Transfer of Syntactic Structure in Synthetic Languages” by A. S. Reber, 1969, Journal of Experimental Psychology, 81, p. 116 (Grammar A).
Mentions: Research into implicit learning with artificial grammars was initiated by A. S. Reber in the late 1960s (Reber, 1967, 1969) and sparked an abundant literature on this phenomenon. This abundance reflects the complexity of the overall claim that, exposed to strings of sentences produced by artificial grammars (see Figure 2) without a learning strategy, subjects actually acquire unconscious knowledge of the grammars. To support this claim, there is the finding that subjects in this experimental paradigm can distinguish grammatical from non-grammatical strings well above chance, while showing no confidence regarding this skill and being incapable of verbalizing their knowledge of the grammars:

Bottom Line: The concept of unconscious knowledge is fundamental for an understanding of human thought processes and mentation in general; however, the psychological community at large is not familiar with it.It shows that the field has already a defined history and discusses some of the features that all kinds of unconscious knowledge seem to share at a deeper level.With the aim of promoting further research, we discuss the main challenges which the postulation of unconscious cognition faces within the psychological community.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Philosophy, Faculty of Letters, University of Porto, Portugal.

ABSTRACT
The concept of unconscious knowledge is fundamental for an understanding of human thought processes and mentation in general; however, the psychological community at large is not familiar with it. This paper offers a survey of the main psychological research currently being carried out into cognitive processes, and examines pathways that can be integrated into a discipline of unconscious knowledge. It shows that the field has already a defined history and discusses some of the features that all kinds of unconscious knowledge seem to share at a deeper level. With the aim of promoting further research, we discuss the main challenges which the postulation of unconscious cognition faces within the psychological community.

No MeSH data available.