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Standard perioperative management in gastrointestinal surgery.

Grade M, Quintel M, Ghadimi BM - Langenbecks Arch Surg (2011)

Bottom Line: To improve patient outcome, close cooperation between surgeons and anaesthesiologists (joint risk assessment) is critical.The aim of this review is to provide clinicians with practical recommendations for day-to-day decision-making from a joint surgical and anaesthesiological point of view.The discussion centres on gastrointestinal surgery specifically.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General and Visceral Surgery, University Medical Center Göttingen, Robert-Koch Str. 40, 37075, Göttingen, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The outcome of patients who are scheduled for gastrointestinal surgery is influenced by various factors, the most important being the age and comorbidities of the patient, the complexity of the surgical procedure and the management of postoperative recovery. To improve patient outcome, close cooperation between surgeons and anaesthesiologists (joint risk assessment) is critical. This cooperation has become increasingly important because more and more patients are being referred to surgery at an advanced age and with multiple comorbidities and because surgical procedures and multimodal treatment modalities are becoming more and more complex.

Objective: The aim of this review is to provide clinicians with practical recommendations for day-to-day decision-making from a joint surgical and anaesthesiological point of view. The discussion centres on gastrointestinal surgery specifically.

Show MeSH
Basic principles of modern perioperative management to improve patient outcome after major gastrointestinal surgery
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Fig1: Basic principles of modern perioperative management to improve patient outcome after major gastrointestinal surgery

Mentions: The outcome of patients who undergo gastrointestinal surgery varies greatly. Factors such as the patient’s age and comorbidities, the complexity of the surgical procedure and the management of postoperative recovery influence the outcome [1, 2]. Modern perioperative management has been improved in numerous ways over the last decade and nowadays is regarded as a highly multidisciplinary task (Fig. 1). Because an ageing population is leading to more and more patients with multiple comorbidities being referred to surgery and because surgical procedures and multimodal treatment modalities are becoming increasingly complex, close cooperation between surgeons and anaesthesiologists (i.e. joint risk assessment) is critical for improving outcome after major gastrointestinal surgery. Internists are also frequently involved to optimise the patient’s physical condition or medication.Fig. 1


Standard perioperative management in gastrointestinal surgery.

Grade M, Quintel M, Ghadimi BM - Langenbecks Arch Surg (2011)

Basic principles of modern perioperative management to improve patient outcome after major gastrointestinal surgery
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3101361&req=5

Fig1: Basic principles of modern perioperative management to improve patient outcome after major gastrointestinal surgery
Mentions: The outcome of patients who undergo gastrointestinal surgery varies greatly. Factors such as the patient’s age and comorbidities, the complexity of the surgical procedure and the management of postoperative recovery influence the outcome [1, 2]. Modern perioperative management has been improved in numerous ways over the last decade and nowadays is regarded as a highly multidisciplinary task (Fig. 1). Because an ageing population is leading to more and more patients with multiple comorbidities being referred to surgery and because surgical procedures and multimodal treatment modalities are becoming increasingly complex, close cooperation between surgeons and anaesthesiologists (i.e. joint risk assessment) is critical for improving outcome after major gastrointestinal surgery. Internists are also frequently involved to optimise the patient’s physical condition or medication.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: To improve patient outcome, close cooperation between surgeons and anaesthesiologists (joint risk assessment) is critical.The aim of this review is to provide clinicians with practical recommendations for day-to-day decision-making from a joint surgical and anaesthesiological point of view.The discussion centres on gastrointestinal surgery specifically.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General and Visceral Surgery, University Medical Center Göttingen, Robert-Koch Str. 40, 37075, Göttingen, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The outcome of patients who are scheduled for gastrointestinal surgery is influenced by various factors, the most important being the age and comorbidities of the patient, the complexity of the surgical procedure and the management of postoperative recovery. To improve patient outcome, close cooperation between surgeons and anaesthesiologists (joint risk assessment) is critical. This cooperation has become increasingly important because more and more patients are being referred to surgery at an advanced age and with multiple comorbidities and because surgical procedures and multimodal treatment modalities are becoming more and more complex.

Objective: The aim of this review is to provide clinicians with practical recommendations for day-to-day decision-making from a joint surgical and anaesthesiological point of view. The discussion centres on gastrointestinal surgery specifically.

Show MeSH