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Migration and multiple sclerosis in immigrants to Australia from United Kingdom and Ireland: a reassessment. I. Risk of MS by age at immigration.

McLeod JG, Hammond SR, Kurtzke JF - J. Neurol. (2011)

Bottom Line: There was a highly significant trend in the prevalence rates of all Australians from New South Wales (NSW) to South Australia (SA) to Western Australia (WA) to Queensland (QLD).The absolute risk of MS for these migrants to the four states entering at age 0-14 was 22/100,000, significantly less than for all older age groups; age 15-39 immigrants had a risk of 54/100,000.Similar risk ratios for 0-14 versus 15-39 by state were 31 versus 61 (NSW), 29 versus 44 (QLD), 11 versus 50 (SA), 15 versus 51 (WA).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia. james.mcleod@sydney.edu.au

ABSTRACT
A previous study of the prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in 1981 among immigrants from the United Kingdom and Ireland to Australia found that the prevalence for those with age at immigration (AAI) under 15 years of age did not differ from the older immigrants. We have reanalysed the original materials as well as census data for 1901-1981 for UKI and other high MS risk country immigrants. There was a highly significant trend in the prevalence rates of all Australians from New South Wales (NSW) to South Australia (SA) to Western Australia (WA) to Queensland (QLD). Rates by state among the Australian-born were almost identical to these, but there was no prevalence gradient for the UKI-born. The denominator population at risk of MS by AAI was calculated from special census tables of length of residence in Australia by age 0-79 in 1981 for UKI immigrants 1947-1981. The numerator was limited to the subset of 258 MS (Group II) also immigrating in 1947 and later, and age 0-79 in 1981. The absolute risk of MS for these migrants to the four states entering at age 0-14 was 22/100,000, significantly less than for all older age groups; age 15-39 immigrants had a risk of 54/100,000. Similar risk ratios for 0-14 versus 15-39 by state were 31 versus 61 (NSW), 29 versus 44 (QLD), 11 versus 50 (SA), 15 versus 51 (WA).

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Commonwealth of Australia in 1981 by state : Queensland (QLD), New South Wales (NSW), Victoria (VIC), South Australia (SA), Western Australia (WA), Tasmania (Tas) and Northern Territory (NT). Canberra (Federal Capital Territory), is geographically surrounded by NSW. Major cities are shown
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Fig1: Commonwealth of Australia in 1981 by state : Queensland (QLD), New South Wales (NSW), Victoria (VIC), South Australia (SA), Western Australia (WA), Tasmania (Tas) and Northern Territory (NT). Canberra (Federal Capital Territory), is geographically surrounded by NSW. Major cities are shown

Mentions: In Fig. 1 is a map of the Commonwealth of Australia by state and territory, with the major cities identified. Canberra, the national capital, lies in the Federal Capital Territory, and is not part of the surrounding state of New South Wales. Populations of Australia and the four states of the study were available for each census year, 1901, 1911, 1921, 1933, 1947, 1954, 1961, 1971, and 1981. In this interval the Commonwealth had grown from under 4 million residents to almost 15 million. The percentage of native-born Australians had risen from 77% in 1901 to 90% in 1947, suggesting little immigration in that interval. From 1947, increasing numbers of migrants lowered this percentage back to the first figure, with 76% having been born in Australia at the 1981 census.Fig. 1


Migration and multiple sclerosis in immigrants to Australia from United Kingdom and Ireland: a reassessment. I. Risk of MS by age at immigration.

McLeod JG, Hammond SR, Kurtzke JF - J. Neurol. (2011)

Commonwealth of Australia in 1981 by state : Queensland (QLD), New South Wales (NSW), Victoria (VIC), South Australia (SA), Western Australia (WA), Tasmania (Tas) and Northern Territory (NT). Canberra (Federal Capital Territory), is geographically surrounded by NSW. Major cities are shown
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3101360&req=5

Fig1: Commonwealth of Australia in 1981 by state : Queensland (QLD), New South Wales (NSW), Victoria (VIC), South Australia (SA), Western Australia (WA), Tasmania (Tas) and Northern Territory (NT). Canberra (Federal Capital Territory), is geographically surrounded by NSW. Major cities are shown
Mentions: In Fig. 1 is a map of the Commonwealth of Australia by state and territory, with the major cities identified. Canberra, the national capital, lies in the Federal Capital Territory, and is not part of the surrounding state of New South Wales. Populations of Australia and the four states of the study were available for each census year, 1901, 1911, 1921, 1933, 1947, 1954, 1961, 1971, and 1981. In this interval the Commonwealth had grown from under 4 million residents to almost 15 million. The percentage of native-born Australians had risen from 77% in 1901 to 90% in 1947, suggesting little immigration in that interval. From 1947, increasing numbers of migrants lowered this percentage back to the first figure, with 76% having been born in Australia at the 1981 census.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: There was a highly significant trend in the prevalence rates of all Australians from New South Wales (NSW) to South Australia (SA) to Western Australia (WA) to Queensland (QLD).The absolute risk of MS for these migrants to the four states entering at age 0-14 was 22/100,000, significantly less than for all older age groups; age 15-39 immigrants had a risk of 54/100,000.Similar risk ratios for 0-14 versus 15-39 by state were 31 versus 61 (NSW), 29 versus 44 (QLD), 11 versus 50 (SA), 15 versus 51 (WA).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia. james.mcleod@sydney.edu.au

ABSTRACT
A previous study of the prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in 1981 among immigrants from the United Kingdom and Ireland to Australia found that the prevalence for those with age at immigration (AAI) under 15 years of age did not differ from the older immigrants. We have reanalysed the original materials as well as census data for 1901-1981 for UKI and other high MS risk country immigrants. There was a highly significant trend in the prevalence rates of all Australians from New South Wales (NSW) to South Australia (SA) to Western Australia (WA) to Queensland (QLD). Rates by state among the Australian-born were almost identical to these, but there was no prevalence gradient for the UKI-born. The denominator population at risk of MS by AAI was calculated from special census tables of length of residence in Australia by age 0-79 in 1981 for UKI immigrants 1947-1981. The numerator was limited to the subset of 258 MS (Group II) also immigrating in 1947 and later, and age 0-79 in 1981. The absolute risk of MS for these migrants to the four states entering at age 0-14 was 22/100,000, significantly less than for all older age groups; age 15-39 immigrants had a risk of 54/100,000. Similar risk ratios for 0-14 versus 15-39 by state were 31 versus 61 (NSW), 29 versus 44 (QLD), 11 versus 50 (SA), 15 versus 51 (WA).

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus