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Ultrasound assessment of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex of the elbow: imaging aspects in cadavers and normal volunteers.

Teixeira PA, Omoumi P, Trudell DJ, Ward SR, Lecocq S, Blum A, Resnick DL - Eur Radiol (2011)

Bottom Line: The findings were compared.The three components of the LCL could be visualised in all specimens and normal subjects with the exception of the proximal portion of one specimen.In 80% of the specimens and 100% of the healthy volunteers the proximal portion of the LCL could be separated from the extensor tendons.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Service d'Imagerie Guilloz, CHU Hôpital Central, 10 Boulevard Recteur Senn, Appt 220, 54000 Nancy, France. ped_gt@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT

Objective: The Lateral Collateral Ligamentous complex (LCL) is an important stabiliser of the elbow. It has a Y-shaped structure with three components. In this study, we sought to describe the ultrasound aspect of the individual components of this ligamentous complex and to evaluate the performance of ultrasound in both cadavers and in normal subjects.

Methods: Ten cadaveric elbow specimens underwent high-frequency ultrasound. Two specimens were sliced and two were dissected for anatomical correlation. Ten elbows of normal subjects were also evaluated by ultrasound. The findings were compared.

Results: The three components of the LCL could be visualised in all specimens and normal subjects with the exception of the proximal portion of one specimen. In 80% of the specimens and 100% of the healthy volunteers the proximal portion of the LCL could be separated from the extensor tendons.

Conclusion: High-resolution ultrasound can assess all components of the LCL of the elbow and can distinguish them from surrounding structures.

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Demonstration of the variations of the osseous surface of the lateral epicondyle in a 58-year-old male specimen. a High-definition radiography demonstrating the anterior tubercle (arrowhead), note the radiolucent line between the tendons and the proximal part of the LCL. b Corresponding long axis anterolateral ultrasound image of the elbow at the level of the lateral epicondyle demonstrating the anterior tubercle (arrowhead). Note that the radiolucent line in (A) appears hyperechogenic on ultrasound
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Fig6: Demonstration of the variations of the osseous surface of the lateral epicondyle in a 58-year-old male specimen. a High-definition radiography demonstrating the anterior tubercle (arrowhead), note the radiolucent line between the tendons and the proximal part of the LCL. b Corresponding long axis anterolateral ultrasound image of the elbow at the level of the lateral epicondyle demonstrating the anterior tubercle (arrowhead). Note that the radiolucent line in (A) appears hyperechogenic on ultrasound

Mentions: We identified a small bony tubercle in the anterior-most part of the lateral humeral epicondyle that was located at the site where the hyperechogenic line described between the LCL and the extensor tendons reaches the epicondyle (Fig. 6). This structure was found in 61.1% of the lateral epicondyles analysed (62% of the cadaveric specimens and in 60% of the volunteers).Fig. 6


Ultrasound assessment of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex of the elbow: imaging aspects in cadavers and normal volunteers.

Teixeira PA, Omoumi P, Trudell DJ, Ward SR, Lecocq S, Blum A, Resnick DL - Eur Radiol (2011)

Demonstration of the variations of the osseous surface of the lateral epicondyle in a 58-year-old male specimen. a High-definition radiography demonstrating the anterior tubercle (arrowhead), note the radiolucent line between the tendons and the proximal part of the LCL. b Corresponding long axis anterolateral ultrasound image of the elbow at the level of the lateral epicondyle demonstrating the anterior tubercle (arrowhead). Note that the radiolucent line in (A) appears hyperechogenic on ultrasound
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3101344&req=5

Fig6: Demonstration of the variations of the osseous surface of the lateral epicondyle in a 58-year-old male specimen. a High-definition radiography demonstrating the anterior tubercle (arrowhead), note the radiolucent line between the tendons and the proximal part of the LCL. b Corresponding long axis anterolateral ultrasound image of the elbow at the level of the lateral epicondyle demonstrating the anterior tubercle (arrowhead). Note that the radiolucent line in (A) appears hyperechogenic on ultrasound
Mentions: We identified a small bony tubercle in the anterior-most part of the lateral humeral epicondyle that was located at the site where the hyperechogenic line described between the LCL and the extensor tendons reaches the epicondyle (Fig. 6). This structure was found in 61.1% of the lateral epicondyles analysed (62% of the cadaveric specimens and in 60% of the volunteers).Fig. 6

Bottom Line: The findings were compared.The three components of the LCL could be visualised in all specimens and normal subjects with the exception of the proximal portion of one specimen.In 80% of the specimens and 100% of the healthy volunteers the proximal portion of the LCL could be separated from the extensor tendons.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Service d'Imagerie Guilloz, CHU Hôpital Central, 10 Boulevard Recteur Senn, Appt 220, 54000 Nancy, France. ped_gt@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT

Objective: The Lateral Collateral Ligamentous complex (LCL) is an important stabiliser of the elbow. It has a Y-shaped structure with three components. In this study, we sought to describe the ultrasound aspect of the individual components of this ligamentous complex and to evaluate the performance of ultrasound in both cadavers and in normal subjects.

Methods: Ten cadaveric elbow specimens underwent high-frequency ultrasound. Two specimens were sliced and two were dissected for anatomical correlation. Ten elbows of normal subjects were also evaluated by ultrasound. The findings were compared.

Results: The three components of the LCL could be visualised in all specimens and normal subjects with the exception of the proximal portion of one specimen. In 80% of the specimens and 100% of the healthy volunteers the proximal portion of the LCL could be separated from the extensor tendons.

Conclusion: High-resolution ultrasound can assess all components of the LCL of the elbow and can distinguish them from surrounding structures.

Show MeSH