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Diarrhea, pneumonia, and infectious disease mortality in children aged 5 to 14 years in India.

Morris SK, Bassani DG, Awasthi S, Kumar R, Shet A, Suraweera W, Jha P, MDS Collaborato - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: About 18% of deaths were due to diarrheal diseases, 10% due to pneumonia, 8% due to central nervous system infections, 4% due to measles, and 12% due to other infectious diseases.Nationally, in 2005 about 59 000 and 34 000 children aged 5 to 14 years died from diarrheal diseases and pneumonia, corresponding to mortality of 24.1 and 13.9 per 100 000 respectively.Mortality was nearly 50% higher in girls than in boys for both diarrheal diseases and pneumonia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Global Health Research, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael's Hospital, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. shaun.morris@utoronto.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: Little is known about the causes of death in children in India after age five years. The objective of this study is to provide the first ever direct national and sub-national estimates of infectious disease mortality in Indian children aged 5 to 14 years.

Methods: A verbal autopsy based assessment of 3 855 deaths is children aged 5 to 14 years from a nationally representative survey of deaths occurring in 2001-03 in 1.1 million homes in India.

Results: Infectious diseases accounted for 58% of all deaths among children aged 5 to 14 years. About 18% of deaths were due to diarrheal diseases, 10% due to pneumonia, 8% due to central nervous system infections, 4% due to measles, and 12% due to other infectious diseases. Nationally, in 2005 about 59 000 and 34 000 children aged 5 to 14 years died from diarrheal diseases and pneumonia, corresponding to mortality of 24.1 and 13.9 per 100 000 respectively. Mortality was nearly 50% higher in girls than in boys for both diarrheal diseases and pneumonia.

Conclusions: Approximately 60% of all deaths in this age group are due to infectious diseases and nearly half of these deaths are due to diarrheal diseases and pneumonia. Mortality in this age group from infectious diseases, and diarrhea in particular, is much higher than previously estimated.

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Seasonality of Diarrhea and Pneumonia Deaths.
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pone-0020119-g003: Seasonality of Diarrhea and Pneumonia Deaths.

Mentions: We estimate there were approximately 59 300 (99% CI; 51 900 to 68 700) deaths due to diarrhea and 34 200 (99% CI; 28 700 to 42 300) deaths due to pneumonia in children aged 5 to 14 years in 2005. These correspond to mortality rates of 24·1 (99% CI; 21·1 to 27·9) and 13·9 (99% CI; 11·7 to 17·2) per 100 000 persons, respectively (Figure 1). Proportional mortality from both diarrhea and pneumonia were highest in the north of the country (Figure 2). Diarrheal deaths peaked in the period between June and August (Figure 3). There were significant differences in diarrhea mortality rates by region and gender. Girls had an approximately 50% higher mortality rate due to diarrhea than boys (43% greater in ages 5 to 9 years and 61% greater in ages 10 to 14 years). These differences result in approximately 35% more annual diarrheal deaths among girls (n = 34 200) compared to boys (n = 25 100). There was important regional variation; the diarrhea mortality rate was higher than 25 deaths per 100 000 children aged 5 to 14 years in the northeast, east, and central regions and lower than 12 in the north, west, and south regions. At ages 5 to 14 years, the mortality rate from pneumonia was approximately 50% higher in girls compared to boys, and in the 5 to 9 year old age group it was more than 60% higher in girls compared to boys. Similar to diarrhea mortality, the highest pneumonia mortality was seen in the east, central, and north east regions and the pneumonia mortality rate in the Central region (22·0 per 100 000 (99% CI; 17·0 to 29·3) was nearly 25 times higher than in the South (0·9 per 100 000 (99% CI; 0·2 to 6·2).


Diarrhea, pneumonia, and infectious disease mortality in children aged 5 to 14 years in India.

Morris SK, Bassani DG, Awasthi S, Kumar R, Shet A, Suraweera W, Jha P, MDS Collaborato - PLoS ONE (2011)

Seasonality of Diarrhea and Pneumonia Deaths.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3101242&req=5

pone-0020119-g003: Seasonality of Diarrhea and Pneumonia Deaths.
Mentions: We estimate there were approximately 59 300 (99% CI; 51 900 to 68 700) deaths due to diarrhea and 34 200 (99% CI; 28 700 to 42 300) deaths due to pneumonia in children aged 5 to 14 years in 2005. These correspond to mortality rates of 24·1 (99% CI; 21·1 to 27·9) and 13·9 (99% CI; 11·7 to 17·2) per 100 000 persons, respectively (Figure 1). Proportional mortality from both diarrhea and pneumonia were highest in the north of the country (Figure 2). Diarrheal deaths peaked in the period between June and August (Figure 3). There were significant differences in diarrhea mortality rates by region and gender. Girls had an approximately 50% higher mortality rate due to diarrhea than boys (43% greater in ages 5 to 9 years and 61% greater in ages 10 to 14 years). These differences result in approximately 35% more annual diarrheal deaths among girls (n = 34 200) compared to boys (n = 25 100). There was important regional variation; the diarrhea mortality rate was higher than 25 deaths per 100 000 children aged 5 to 14 years in the northeast, east, and central regions and lower than 12 in the north, west, and south regions. At ages 5 to 14 years, the mortality rate from pneumonia was approximately 50% higher in girls compared to boys, and in the 5 to 9 year old age group it was more than 60% higher in girls compared to boys. Similar to diarrhea mortality, the highest pneumonia mortality was seen in the east, central, and north east regions and the pneumonia mortality rate in the Central region (22·0 per 100 000 (99% CI; 17·0 to 29·3) was nearly 25 times higher than in the South (0·9 per 100 000 (99% CI; 0·2 to 6·2).

Bottom Line: About 18% of deaths were due to diarrheal diseases, 10% due to pneumonia, 8% due to central nervous system infections, 4% due to measles, and 12% due to other infectious diseases.Nationally, in 2005 about 59 000 and 34 000 children aged 5 to 14 years died from diarrheal diseases and pneumonia, corresponding to mortality of 24.1 and 13.9 per 100 000 respectively.Mortality was nearly 50% higher in girls than in boys for both diarrheal diseases and pneumonia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Global Health Research, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael's Hospital, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. shaun.morris@utoronto.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: Little is known about the causes of death in children in India after age five years. The objective of this study is to provide the first ever direct national and sub-national estimates of infectious disease mortality in Indian children aged 5 to 14 years.

Methods: A verbal autopsy based assessment of 3 855 deaths is children aged 5 to 14 years from a nationally representative survey of deaths occurring in 2001-03 in 1.1 million homes in India.

Results: Infectious diseases accounted for 58% of all deaths among children aged 5 to 14 years. About 18% of deaths were due to diarrheal diseases, 10% due to pneumonia, 8% due to central nervous system infections, 4% due to measles, and 12% due to other infectious diseases. Nationally, in 2005 about 59 000 and 34 000 children aged 5 to 14 years died from diarrheal diseases and pneumonia, corresponding to mortality of 24.1 and 13.9 per 100 000 respectively. Mortality was nearly 50% higher in girls than in boys for both diarrheal diseases and pneumonia.

Conclusions: Approximately 60% of all deaths in this age group are due to infectious diseases and nearly half of these deaths are due to diarrheal diseases and pneumonia. Mortality in this age group from infectious diseases, and diarrhea in particular, is much higher than previously estimated.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus