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Measuring generalization of visuomotor perturbations in wrist movements using mobile phones.

Fernandes HL, Albert MV, Kording KP - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: To do so we had 7 subjects performing an experiment holding a mobile phone in their dominant hand.The mobile phone's built in acceleration sensor provided a convenient way to measure wrist movements and to run the behavioral protocol.We find that generalization is local and similar to generalization patterns of visuomotor rotation for reaching.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northwestern University and Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America. hugoguh@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
Recent studies in motor control have shown that visuomotor rotations for reaching have narrow generalization functions: what we learn during movements in one direction only affects subsequent movements into close directions. Here we wanted to measure the generalization functions for wrist movement. To do so we had 7 subjects performing an experiment holding a mobile phone in their dominant hand. The mobile phone's built in acceleration sensor provided a convenient way to measure wrist movements and to run the behavioral protocol. Subjects moved a cursor on the screen by tilting the phone. Movements on the screen toward the training target were rotated and we then measured how learning of the rotation in the training direction affected subsequent movements in other directions. We find that generalization is local and similar to generalization patterns of visuomotor rotation for reaching.

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Experimental setup and validation.A) Subjects hold an android mobile phone with their dominant hand. They control the position of a cursor on the screen of the mobile phone by tilting it. During perturbed trials the cursor position is rotated 30° degrees relative to the true direction of tilt. B) Comparing the measured angle of tilt around the proximal-distal and medial-lateral axis using the optotrack versus using the mobile phone. Red line is the y = x axis.
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pone-0020290-g001: Experimental setup and validation.A) Subjects hold an android mobile phone with their dominant hand. They control the position of a cursor on the screen of the mobile phone by tilting it. During perturbed trials the cursor position is rotated 30° degrees relative to the true direction of tilt. B) Comparing the measured angle of tilt around the proximal-distal and medial-lateral axis using the optotrack versus using the mobile phone. Red line is the y = x axis.

Mentions: To ask how knowledge of visuomotor perturbations generalizes from one direction of movement to other directions we conducted an experiment using an android mobile phone (see methods for detail). A cursor was presented on the screen (Fig. 1A) that indicated the tilt angle of the phone. After a block of trials to accustom subjects to the task and apparatus we introduced a perturbation during movements into the training direction. In movements toward the training direction, subjects obtained feedback at the end of every trial, which allowed them to learn about the perturbation. After learning, we interspersed trials where subjects moved into other directions without feedback to assess the amount of generalization.


Measuring generalization of visuomotor perturbations in wrist movements using mobile phones.

Fernandes HL, Albert MV, Kording KP - PLoS ONE (2011)

Experimental setup and validation.A) Subjects hold an android mobile phone with their dominant hand. They control the position of a cursor on the screen of the mobile phone by tilting it. During perturbed trials the cursor position is rotated 30° degrees relative to the true direction of tilt. B) Comparing the measured angle of tilt around the proximal-distal and medial-lateral axis using the optotrack versus using the mobile phone. Red line is the y = x axis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3101241&req=5

pone-0020290-g001: Experimental setup and validation.A) Subjects hold an android mobile phone with their dominant hand. They control the position of a cursor on the screen of the mobile phone by tilting it. During perturbed trials the cursor position is rotated 30° degrees relative to the true direction of tilt. B) Comparing the measured angle of tilt around the proximal-distal and medial-lateral axis using the optotrack versus using the mobile phone. Red line is the y = x axis.
Mentions: To ask how knowledge of visuomotor perturbations generalizes from one direction of movement to other directions we conducted an experiment using an android mobile phone (see methods for detail). A cursor was presented on the screen (Fig. 1A) that indicated the tilt angle of the phone. After a block of trials to accustom subjects to the task and apparatus we introduced a perturbation during movements into the training direction. In movements toward the training direction, subjects obtained feedback at the end of every trial, which allowed them to learn about the perturbation. After learning, we interspersed trials where subjects moved into other directions without feedback to assess the amount of generalization.

Bottom Line: To do so we had 7 subjects performing an experiment holding a mobile phone in their dominant hand.The mobile phone's built in acceleration sensor provided a convenient way to measure wrist movements and to run the behavioral protocol.We find that generalization is local and similar to generalization patterns of visuomotor rotation for reaching.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northwestern University and Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America. hugoguh@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
Recent studies in motor control have shown that visuomotor rotations for reaching have narrow generalization functions: what we learn during movements in one direction only affects subsequent movements into close directions. Here we wanted to measure the generalization functions for wrist movement. To do so we had 7 subjects performing an experiment holding a mobile phone in their dominant hand. The mobile phone's built in acceleration sensor provided a convenient way to measure wrist movements and to run the behavioral protocol. Subjects moved a cursor on the screen by tilting the phone. Movements on the screen toward the training target were rotated and we then measured how learning of the rotation in the training direction affected subsequent movements in other directions. We find that generalization is local and similar to generalization patterns of visuomotor rotation for reaching.

Show MeSH