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Comparison of periodontal status among patients with cleft lip, cleft palate, and cleft lip along with a cleft in palate and alveolus.

Boloor V, Thomas B - J Indian Soc Periodontol (2010)

Bottom Line: According to literature, a critical periodontal situation was found in patients with CLAP.Statistically significant increase in the periodontal disease in the CLAP group as compared with the other 2 groups, and the oral hygiene was seen to be generally poor with the CLAP group.Individuals with clefts are more prone to periodontal disease due to the presence of cleft, which causes retention of food in the defect sites and inability to maintain good oral hygiene; but the severity of periodontal disease is more if the defect is large and involving the lip, alveolus and palate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Periodontics, Yenepoya Dental College, Deralakatte, Mangalore - 575 018, India.

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: A healthy periodontium is an important prerequisite for unhindered dentition and long-term oral health. In cleft subjects, especially in those with cleft lip, alveolus and palate (CLAP), maintenance of oral hygiene is a difficult task for the patients because of the patent oro-nasal communication. Crowding of teeth in cleft patients is a common finding, especially in those with CLAP and those with cleft palate (CP). In the case of multiple tooth-malpositions, transverse deficiency, arch length deficiency and primary cross-bite; periodontal trauma increases and is detrimental to periodontal health. According to literature, a critical periodontal situation was found in patients with CLAP. Hence a study was conducted to analyze the periodontal status of patients with cleft lip (CL); those with cleft palate; and those with cleft lip, alveolus and palate.

Materials and methods: The present study consisted of 60 cleft subjects divided into 3 groups: those with cleft lip; those with cleft palate; and those with cleft lip, alveolus and palate. Subjects with permanent dentition were selected, and the clinical examination included determination of oral hygiene status using Oral Hygiene Index - Simplified (OHI-S) index and periodontal status using community periodontal index (CPI).

Results: Statistically significant increase in the periodontal disease in the CLAP group as compared with the other 2 groups, and the oral hygiene was seen to be generally poor with the CLAP group.

Interpretation and conclusion: Individuals with clefts are more prone to periodontal disease due to the presence of cleft, which causes retention of food in the defect sites and inability to maintain good oral hygiene; but the severity of periodontal disease is more if the defect is large and involving the lip, alveolus and palate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of the three cleft groups according to the grades of OHI-S
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Figure 0009: Comparison of the three cleft groups according to the grades of OHI-S

Mentions: Scores on OHI-S[16] [Figures 8 and 9] assessed the state of oral hygiene in these three cleft groups. The results demonstrated that oral hygiene was generally seen to be poor in 75% of cleft lip, alveolus and palate subjects when compared to cleft palate (30%) and cleft lip (20%) group subjects, although the brushing habits were of similar duration and frequency. Brägger et al.[1112] also found similar results for oral hygiene, but the sample size was not comparable. These authors reported a value of 65% to 77% for the plaque control record plaque scores,[17] which also corresponds to a poor oral hygiene situation in cleft lip, alveolus and palate subjects when compared to cleft palate group. Scores on CPI index[18] assessed periodontal status of these cleft subjects. Sextant-wise evaluation of the CPI scores was done among the three groups.


Comparison of periodontal status among patients with cleft lip, cleft palate, and cleft lip along with a cleft in palate and alveolus.

Boloor V, Thomas B - J Indian Soc Periodontol (2010)

Comparison of the three cleft groups according to the grades of OHI-S
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3100859&req=5

Figure 0009: Comparison of the three cleft groups according to the grades of OHI-S
Mentions: Scores on OHI-S[16] [Figures 8 and 9] assessed the state of oral hygiene in these three cleft groups. The results demonstrated that oral hygiene was generally seen to be poor in 75% of cleft lip, alveolus and palate subjects when compared to cleft palate (30%) and cleft lip (20%) group subjects, although the brushing habits were of similar duration and frequency. Brägger et al.[1112] also found similar results for oral hygiene, but the sample size was not comparable. These authors reported a value of 65% to 77% for the plaque control record plaque scores,[17] which also corresponds to a poor oral hygiene situation in cleft lip, alveolus and palate subjects when compared to cleft palate group. Scores on CPI index[18] assessed periodontal status of these cleft subjects. Sextant-wise evaluation of the CPI scores was done among the three groups.

Bottom Line: According to literature, a critical periodontal situation was found in patients with CLAP.Statistically significant increase in the periodontal disease in the CLAP group as compared with the other 2 groups, and the oral hygiene was seen to be generally poor with the CLAP group.Individuals with clefts are more prone to periodontal disease due to the presence of cleft, which causes retention of food in the defect sites and inability to maintain good oral hygiene; but the severity of periodontal disease is more if the defect is large and involving the lip, alveolus and palate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Periodontics, Yenepoya Dental College, Deralakatte, Mangalore - 575 018, India.

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: A healthy periodontium is an important prerequisite for unhindered dentition and long-term oral health. In cleft subjects, especially in those with cleft lip, alveolus and palate (CLAP), maintenance of oral hygiene is a difficult task for the patients because of the patent oro-nasal communication. Crowding of teeth in cleft patients is a common finding, especially in those with CLAP and those with cleft palate (CP). In the case of multiple tooth-malpositions, transverse deficiency, arch length deficiency and primary cross-bite; periodontal trauma increases and is detrimental to periodontal health. According to literature, a critical periodontal situation was found in patients with CLAP. Hence a study was conducted to analyze the periodontal status of patients with cleft lip (CL); those with cleft palate; and those with cleft lip, alveolus and palate.

Materials and methods: The present study consisted of 60 cleft subjects divided into 3 groups: those with cleft lip; those with cleft palate; and those with cleft lip, alveolus and palate. Subjects with permanent dentition were selected, and the clinical examination included determination of oral hygiene status using Oral Hygiene Index - Simplified (OHI-S) index and periodontal status using community periodontal index (CPI).

Results: Statistically significant increase in the periodontal disease in the CLAP group as compared with the other 2 groups, and the oral hygiene was seen to be generally poor with the CLAP group.

Interpretation and conclusion: Individuals with clefts are more prone to periodontal disease due to the presence of cleft, which causes retention of food in the defect sites and inability to maintain good oral hygiene; but the severity of periodontal disease is more if the defect is large and involving the lip, alveolus and palate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus