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Screening of molecular virulence markers in Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from clinical infections.

Cotar AI, Chifiriuc MC, Dinu S, Bucur M, Iordache C, Banu O, Dracea O, Larion C, Lazar V - Int J Mol Sci (2010)

Bottom Line: Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and Pseudomonas (Ps.) aeruginosa are two of the most frequently opportunistic pathogens isolated in nosocomial infections, responsible for severe infections in immunocompromised hosts.The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular markers of virulence in S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains isolated from different clinical specimens.Our results demonstrate that all the studied S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains synthesize the majority of the investigated virulence determinants, probably responsible for different types of infections.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute for Research in Microbiology and Immunology, Cantacuzino, Spl. Independentei 103, cod 060631, Bucharest 060101, Romania; E-Mails: aniioana@yahoo.com (A.-I.C.); carmeniordache78@yahoo.com (C.I.); olgutza_dracea@yahoo.co.uk (O.D.); larioncristina@yahoo.com (C.L.).

ABSTRACT
Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and Pseudomonas (Ps.) aeruginosa are two of the most frequently opportunistic pathogens isolated in nosocomial infections, responsible for severe infections in immunocompromised hosts. The frequent emergence of antibiotic-resistant S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains has determined the development of new strategies in order to elucidate the different mechanisms used by these bacteria at different stages of the infectious process, providing the scientists with new procedures for preventing, or at least improving, the control of S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa infections. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular markers of virulence in S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains isolated from different clinical specimens. We used multiplex and uniplex PCR assays to detect the genes encoding different cell-wall associated and extracellular virulence factors, in order to evaluate potential associations between the presence of putative virulence genes and the outcome of infections caused by these bacteria. Our results demonstrate that all the studied S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains synthesize the majority of the investigated virulence determinants, probably responsible for different types of infections.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Multiplex PCR assay for simultaneous detection of luk-PV si hlg genes. Line 1: DNA ladder 100bp; 2: S. aureus 10936; 3: S. aureus 11372; 4: S. aureus 11327; 5: MRSA 11325; 6: MRSA 11573; 7: MRSA 11047; 8: S. aureus 5/06; 9: S. aureus 9/06; 10: S. aureus 11323; and 11: negative control (pure water).
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f6-ijms-11-05273: Multiplex PCR assay for simultaneous detection of luk-PV si hlg genes. Line 1: DNA ladder 100bp; 2: S. aureus 10936; 3: S. aureus 11372; 4: S. aureus 11327; 5: MRSA 11325; 6: MRSA 11573; 7: MRSA 11047; 8: S. aureus 5/06; 9: S. aureus 9/06; 10: S. aureus 11323; and 11: negative control (pure water).

Mentions: Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is a bicomponent leukocidin responsible for leukocyte destruction and tissue necrosis. PVL, together with gamma-hemolysin, belongs to the recently described family of synergohymenotropic toxins. These toxins determine membrane disruptions of host defense cells and erythrocytes by the synergistic activity of two non-associated classes of secretory proteins, designated as S and F [9]. The results of multiplex PCR for detection of genes encoding these toxins showed that hlg gene was present in all analyzed S. aureus strains, whereas the luk-PV gene was absent (Figure 6). These results are in agreement with those published, that is to say virtually all strains of S. aureus synthesize gamma-hemolysin, whereas PVL is synthesized only by less than 5% of strains [10]. However, the PVL gene is frequently seen in S. aureus strains associated with necrotic lesions involving the skin, and in severe necrotic hemorrhagic pneumonia, whereas it is seldom seen in strains responsible for other infections, such as infective endocarditis and hospital-acquired staphylococcal infections.


Screening of molecular virulence markers in Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from clinical infections.

Cotar AI, Chifiriuc MC, Dinu S, Bucur M, Iordache C, Banu O, Dracea O, Larion C, Lazar V - Int J Mol Sci (2010)

Multiplex PCR assay for simultaneous detection of luk-PV si hlg genes. Line 1: DNA ladder 100bp; 2: S. aureus 10936; 3: S. aureus 11372; 4: S. aureus 11327; 5: MRSA 11325; 6: MRSA 11573; 7: MRSA 11047; 8: S. aureus 5/06; 9: S. aureus 9/06; 10: S. aureus 11323; and 11: negative control (pure water).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3100824&req=5

f6-ijms-11-05273: Multiplex PCR assay for simultaneous detection of luk-PV si hlg genes. Line 1: DNA ladder 100bp; 2: S. aureus 10936; 3: S. aureus 11372; 4: S. aureus 11327; 5: MRSA 11325; 6: MRSA 11573; 7: MRSA 11047; 8: S. aureus 5/06; 9: S. aureus 9/06; 10: S. aureus 11323; and 11: negative control (pure water).
Mentions: Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is a bicomponent leukocidin responsible for leukocyte destruction and tissue necrosis. PVL, together with gamma-hemolysin, belongs to the recently described family of synergohymenotropic toxins. These toxins determine membrane disruptions of host defense cells and erythrocytes by the synergistic activity of two non-associated classes of secretory proteins, designated as S and F [9]. The results of multiplex PCR for detection of genes encoding these toxins showed that hlg gene was present in all analyzed S. aureus strains, whereas the luk-PV gene was absent (Figure 6). These results are in agreement with those published, that is to say virtually all strains of S. aureus synthesize gamma-hemolysin, whereas PVL is synthesized only by less than 5% of strains [10]. However, the PVL gene is frequently seen in S. aureus strains associated with necrotic lesions involving the skin, and in severe necrotic hemorrhagic pneumonia, whereas it is seldom seen in strains responsible for other infections, such as infective endocarditis and hospital-acquired staphylococcal infections.

Bottom Line: Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and Pseudomonas (Ps.) aeruginosa are two of the most frequently opportunistic pathogens isolated in nosocomial infections, responsible for severe infections in immunocompromised hosts.The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular markers of virulence in S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains isolated from different clinical specimens.Our results demonstrate that all the studied S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains synthesize the majority of the investigated virulence determinants, probably responsible for different types of infections.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute for Research in Microbiology and Immunology, Cantacuzino, Spl. Independentei 103, cod 060631, Bucharest 060101, Romania; E-Mails: aniioana@yahoo.com (A.-I.C.); carmeniordache78@yahoo.com (C.I.); olgutza_dracea@yahoo.co.uk (O.D.); larioncristina@yahoo.com (C.L.).

ABSTRACT
Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and Pseudomonas (Ps.) aeruginosa are two of the most frequently opportunistic pathogens isolated in nosocomial infections, responsible for severe infections in immunocompromised hosts. The frequent emergence of antibiotic-resistant S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains has determined the development of new strategies in order to elucidate the different mechanisms used by these bacteria at different stages of the infectious process, providing the scientists with new procedures for preventing, or at least improving, the control of S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa infections. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular markers of virulence in S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains isolated from different clinical specimens. We used multiplex and uniplex PCR assays to detect the genes encoding different cell-wall associated and extracellular virulence factors, in order to evaluate potential associations between the presence of putative virulence genes and the outcome of infections caused by these bacteria. Our results demonstrate that all the studied S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains synthesize the majority of the investigated virulence determinants, probably responsible for different types of infections.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus