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Shoulder dislocation in patients older than 60 years of age.

Rapariz JM, Martin-Martin S, Pareja-Bezares A, Ortega-Klein J - Int J Shoulder Surg (2010)

Bottom Line: The degree of rotator cuff involvement on the coronal plane does not significantly affect the shoulder's functional outcome.Recurrence is due to an injury in the anterior support or both (anterior and posterior), even though shoulder function gets impaired when a rotation cuff tear occurs with anterior extension on the sagittal plane.Evidence level: IV Case series.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hospital Son Llàtzer, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation in elderly patients is a little studied condition. The goal of this paper is to clarify the role of associated injuries with respect to loss of function and recurrence of dislocation.

Materials and methods: We have conducted a retrospective, descriptive study on 29 patients older than 60 years at the moment they suffered their first dislocation episode. All patients were assessed clinically (Constant test) and by imaging testing (X-ray, MRI).

Results: Nine (31.03%) out of 29 patients had a recurrent dislocation. Four of them required reconstructive surgery to maintain joint stability. Injury to the anterior support (anterior labrum, anterior glenoid rim) showed a statistically significant relation to the recurrence of dislocations. The occurrence or non-occurrence of a rotator cuff tear does have an impact on the shoulder function. The degree of rotator cuff involvement on the coronal plane does not significantly affect the shoulder's functional outcome. The tear extension on the sagittal plane does cause impairment on the Constant test.

Conclusions: Labrum and/or anterior glenoid involvement should be suspected in elderly patients presenting with recurrent shoulder dislocation. Recurrence is due to an injury in the anterior support or both (anterior and posterior), even though shoulder function gets impaired when a rotation cuff tear occurs with anterior extension on the sagittal plane. Evidence level: IV Case series.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Constant score versus the number of dislocations. Vertical axis: number of dislocations: horizontal axis, Constant score
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Figure 0002: Constant score versus the number of dislocations. Vertical axis: number of dislocations: horizontal axis, Constant score

Mentions: The functional outcome, according to Constant’s scale, was not significantly modified, as there was only one dislocation (Constant’s mean 63.6; DT 17.2) and it was recurrent (Constant’s mean 59.6; DT 23.6). Nonetheless, the function of the shoulder deteriorated when the patient suffered more than two dislocations [Figure 2].


Shoulder dislocation in patients older than 60 years of age.

Rapariz JM, Martin-Martin S, Pareja-Bezares A, Ortega-Klein J - Int J Shoulder Surg (2010)

Constant score versus the number of dislocations. Vertical axis: number of dislocations: horizontal axis, Constant score
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3100813&req=5

Figure 0002: Constant score versus the number of dislocations. Vertical axis: number of dislocations: horizontal axis, Constant score
Mentions: The functional outcome, according to Constant’s scale, was not significantly modified, as there was only one dislocation (Constant’s mean 63.6; DT 17.2) and it was recurrent (Constant’s mean 59.6; DT 23.6). Nonetheless, the function of the shoulder deteriorated when the patient suffered more than two dislocations [Figure 2].

Bottom Line: The degree of rotator cuff involvement on the coronal plane does not significantly affect the shoulder's functional outcome.Recurrence is due to an injury in the anterior support or both (anterior and posterior), even though shoulder function gets impaired when a rotation cuff tear occurs with anterior extension on the sagittal plane.Evidence level: IV Case series.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hospital Son Llàtzer, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation in elderly patients is a little studied condition. The goal of this paper is to clarify the role of associated injuries with respect to loss of function and recurrence of dislocation.

Materials and methods: We have conducted a retrospective, descriptive study on 29 patients older than 60 years at the moment they suffered their first dislocation episode. All patients were assessed clinically (Constant test) and by imaging testing (X-ray, MRI).

Results: Nine (31.03%) out of 29 patients had a recurrent dislocation. Four of them required reconstructive surgery to maintain joint stability. Injury to the anterior support (anterior labrum, anterior glenoid rim) showed a statistically significant relation to the recurrence of dislocations. The occurrence or non-occurrence of a rotator cuff tear does have an impact on the shoulder function. The degree of rotator cuff involvement on the coronal plane does not significantly affect the shoulder's functional outcome. The tear extension on the sagittal plane does cause impairment on the Constant test.

Conclusions: Labrum and/or anterior glenoid involvement should be suspected in elderly patients presenting with recurrent shoulder dislocation. Recurrence is due to an injury in the anterior support or both (anterior and posterior), even though shoulder function gets impaired when a rotation cuff tear occurs with anterior extension on the sagittal plane. Evidence level: IV Case series.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus