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A revision of the purse-web spider genus Calommata Lucas, 1837 (Araneae, Atypidae) in the Afrotropical Region.

Fourie R, Haddad CR, Jocqué R - Zookeys (2011)

Bottom Line: While Calommata simoni is very widespread across tropical Africa, Calommata transvaalica is endemic to northern South Africa.Four new species are described, all known only from males: Calommata megaesp. n. (Zimbabwe), Calommata meridionalissp. n. (South Africa), Calommata namibicasp. n. (Namibia) and Calommata tibialissp. n. (Ivory Coast and Togo).Notes are presented on the biology of each species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology & Entomology, University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
The purse-web spider genus Calommata Lucas, 1837 is revised in the Afrotropical Region. Following examination of the female type material, Calommata transvaalica Hewitt, 1916 is removed from synonymy with Calommata simoni Pocock, 1903 and revalidated. The females of both species are redescribed and their males described for the first time. While Calommata simoni is very widespread across tropical Africa, Calommata transvaalica is endemic to northern South Africa. Four new species are described, all known only from males: Calommata megaesp. n. (Zimbabwe), Calommata meridionalissp. n. (South Africa), Calommata namibicasp. n. (Namibia) and Calommata tibialissp. n. (Ivory Coast and Togo). Notes are presented on the biology of each species.

No MeSH data available.


Scanning electron micrographs of Calommata meridionalis sp. n. 20–25 Calommata simoni Pocock 26–28 and Calommata tibialis sp. n. 29–31 males 20, 29 chelicera in ventral view 21 tip of fang 22 right endite, ventral view 23, 27 tarsus and claw, leg I (note pseudosegmentation of tarsus) 24, 30 tarsus IV, lateral and ventral view (note pseudosegmentation of tarsus) 25, 28, 31 detail of ventral scopulate setae on tarsus IV 26 chelicera in prolateral view.
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Figure 3: Scanning electron micrographs of Calommata meridionalis sp. n. 20–25 Calommata simoni Pocock 26–28 and Calommata tibialis sp. n. 29–31 males 20, 29 chelicera in ventral view 21 tip of fang 22 right endite, ventral view 23, 27 tarsus and claw, leg I (note pseudosegmentation of tarsus) 24, 30 tarsus IV, lateral and ventral view (note pseudosegmentation of tarsus) 25, 28, 31 detail of ventral scopulate setae on tarsus IV 26 chelicera in prolateral view.

Mentions: The Atypidae, with a residual dorsal abdominal scutum in males, can be characterised by (Raven 1985): 1) the extremely elongate, curved inner portion of the maxillary lobes (Figs 10, 11), 2) the broad and obliquely truncated posterior median spinnerets (Figs 32, 35), 3) the rotated orientation of the maxillae (Figs 12–19), and 4) the teeth on the paired and unpaired claws of males and females that are raised on a common process, giving the appearance of a single multipectinate tooth (Raven 1985). However, the latter character is not applicable to the Calommata investigated here, neither in males (Figs 23, 27) nor females. Within the family, the three genera can be separated by palpal, spermathecal and sternal morphology, discussed in the diagnosis below.


A revision of the purse-web spider genus Calommata Lucas, 1837 (Araneae, Atypidae) in the Afrotropical Region.

Fourie R, Haddad CR, Jocqué R - Zookeys (2011)

Scanning electron micrographs of Calommata meridionalis sp. n. 20–25 Calommata simoni Pocock 26–28 and Calommata tibialis sp. n. 29–31 males 20, 29 chelicera in ventral view 21 tip of fang 22 right endite, ventral view 23, 27 tarsus and claw, leg I (note pseudosegmentation of tarsus) 24, 30 tarsus IV, lateral and ventral view (note pseudosegmentation of tarsus) 25, 28, 31 detail of ventral scopulate setae on tarsus IV 26 chelicera in prolateral view.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3095129&req=5

Figure 3: Scanning electron micrographs of Calommata meridionalis sp. n. 20–25 Calommata simoni Pocock 26–28 and Calommata tibialis sp. n. 29–31 males 20, 29 chelicera in ventral view 21 tip of fang 22 right endite, ventral view 23, 27 tarsus and claw, leg I (note pseudosegmentation of tarsus) 24, 30 tarsus IV, lateral and ventral view (note pseudosegmentation of tarsus) 25, 28, 31 detail of ventral scopulate setae on tarsus IV 26 chelicera in prolateral view.
Mentions: The Atypidae, with a residual dorsal abdominal scutum in males, can be characterised by (Raven 1985): 1) the extremely elongate, curved inner portion of the maxillary lobes (Figs 10, 11), 2) the broad and obliquely truncated posterior median spinnerets (Figs 32, 35), 3) the rotated orientation of the maxillae (Figs 12–19), and 4) the teeth on the paired and unpaired claws of males and females that are raised on a common process, giving the appearance of a single multipectinate tooth (Raven 1985). However, the latter character is not applicable to the Calommata investigated here, neither in males (Figs 23, 27) nor females. Within the family, the three genera can be separated by palpal, spermathecal and sternal morphology, discussed in the diagnosis below.

Bottom Line: While Calommata simoni is very widespread across tropical Africa, Calommata transvaalica is endemic to northern South Africa.Four new species are described, all known only from males: Calommata megaesp. n. (Zimbabwe), Calommata meridionalissp. n. (South Africa), Calommata namibicasp. n. (Namibia) and Calommata tibialissp. n. (Ivory Coast and Togo).Notes are presented on the biology of each species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology & Entomology, University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
The purse-web spider genus Calommata Lucas, 1837 is revised in the Afrotropical Region. Following examination of the female type material, Calommata transvaalica Hewitt, 1916 is removed from synonymy with Calommata simoni Pocock, 1903 and revalidated. The females of both species are redescribed and their males described for the first time. While Calommata simoni is very widespread across tropical Africa, Calommata transvaalica is endemic to northern South Africa. Four new species are described, all known only from males: Calommata megaesp. n. (Zimbabwe), Calommata meridionalissp. n. (South Africa), Calommata namibicasp. n. (Namibia) and Calommata tibialissp. n. (Ivory Coast and Togo). Notes are presented on the biology of each species.

No MeSH data available.